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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

Anthony S. Denzer, Interim Department Head
3074 Engineering Building
Phone: (307) 766-5255 FAX: (307) 766-2221
Website: http://www.uwyo.edu/civil/

Professors

MICHAEL G. BARKER, B.S. Purdue University 1993; M.S. 1987; Ph.D. University of Minnesota 1990; Professor of Civil Engineering 2003.
PATRICIA J.S. COLBERG, B.S. North Dakota State University 1975; M.S. University of Idaho 1977; Ph.D. Stanford University 1983; Associate Professor of Zoology and Physiology 1998; Professor of Civil Engineering 2013, 2009.
ROBERT ETTEMA,
B.E. University of Aukland 1975; M.E. University of Aukland 1977; Ph.D. University of Aukland 1980; Professor of Civil Engineering 2007.
KHALED KSAIBATI, B.S. Wayne State University 1984; M.S. Purdue University 1986; Ph.D. Purdue University 1990; Professor of Civil Engineering 2001, 1990.
FRED L. OGDEN, B.S. Colorado State University 1987; M.S. 1989; Ph.D. 1992; Professor, Cline Distinguished Chair in Engineering, Environment, and Natural Resources 2006.
JAY A. PUCKETT, B.S. University of Missouri 1978; M.S. Colorado State University 1980; Ph.D. 1983; Professor of Civil Engineering 2011, 1983.
MICHAEL A. URYNOWICZ, B.S. Michigan State University 1990; M.S. University of Wisconsin 1995; M.S. Colorado School of Mines 1998; Ph.D. 2000; Professor of Civil Engineering 2014, 2002.

Associate Professors

JONATHAN A. BRANT, B.S. Virginia Military Institute 1998; M.S. University of Nevada 2000; Ph.D. 2003; Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 2014, 2008.
ANTHONY S. DENZER,
B.A. University of California, Berkeley 1991; M.Arch. University of Kansas 1998; Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles 2005; Associate Professor of Architectural Engineering 2011, 2005.
DAVID J. MUKAI, B.S. University of Hawaii 1983; M.S. 1985; Ph.D. University of Washington 1991; Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 2005, 2001.
JENNIFER E. TANNER, B.A. Eastern College 1994; B.S. Oklahoma State University 1995; M.S. University of Costa Rica 1998; Ph.D. University of Texas 2003; Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 2009, 2003.
JIANTING “JULIAN” ZHU, B.S. Zhejiang University 1983; M.S. Peking University 1985; Ph.D. Dalhousie University 1996; Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 2012.

Assistant Professors

MOHAMED AHMED, B.S. Al-Azhar University 2001; M.S. University of Central Florida 2009; Ph.D. 2012; Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 2013.
KAM NG, B.S. Iowa State University 1996; M.S. 1997; Ph.D. 2011; Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 2012.
NORIAKI OHARA, B.A. Chuo University 1997; M.A. 1999; Ph.D. University of California-Davis 2003; Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 2012.
GANG TAN, B.S. Tsinghua University 1998; M.S. 2001; Ph.D. M.I.T. 2005; Assistant Professor of Architectural Engineering 2009.
LIPING WANG, B.S. Xi/an University of Architecture and Technology 2001; M.S. 2003; Ph.D. National University of Singapore 2007; Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 2013.

Professor of Practice

WILLIAM D. BELLAMY, B.S. University of Wyoming 1972; M.S. 1974; Ph.D. Colorado State University 1984; Professor of Practice of Civil Engineering 2013.

Academic Professionals

ROBERT ERIKSON, B.S. North Dakota State University 1988; M.S. University of Idaho 1997; Ph.D. University of Wyoming 2003; Academic Professional 2012, 2003.
JON A. GARDZELEWSKI, B.S. University of Wyoming 2002; M.Arch. University of Oregon 2005; Academic Professional in Architectural Engineering 2012, 2010.
RYAN KOBBE, B.S. University of Wyoming 2003; M.S. Washington State University 2005; Academic Professional in Architectural Engineering 2011.
MARK D. REHWALDT, B.S. University of North Dakota 1977; M.E. 1980; Academic Professional in Civil Engineering 2009.

Adjunct Faculty

Song Jin, James Kladianos, Patrick McManus, Marcie Miller

Professors Emeriti

Leonard B. Baldwin, Jr., Arthur P. Boresi, Robert L. Champlin, Charles W. Dolan, Thomas V. Edgar, K. James Fornstrom, David H. Foster, Victor R. Hasfurther, Michael Humenick, Don Lamb, Anton Munari, Larry O. Pochop, Paul Rechard, Richard J. Schmidt, James L. Smith, John P. Turner, Eugene M. Wilson

Civil and Architectural Engineering

The mission of the Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering at the University of Wyoming is to:

  1. Educate civil and architectural engineers to design, build, operate and manage sustainable human habitat and infrastructure systems for Wyoming and the world.
  2. Develop the technical solutions to support sustainable human habitat and infrastructure systems through research, innovation, application, design, and technology transfer.

Civil Engineering

The civil engineering curriculum begins with a basic education in the physical, engineering, mathematical and computer sciences. This foundation supports further development of engineering topics that prepare the engineer to address critical societal needs. To meet these needs, the civil engineer designs and builds bridges, buildings, dams and hydraulic structures, pipelines and canals, power plants, transportation facilities, sanitary and environmental engineering facilities, surveying and mapping systems, space and ocean platforms, as well as numerous other engineering systems. The civil engineer must also be aware of the social, humanistic, and political aspects of their projects. Therefore, course work in the humanities and social sciences is required to better understand the social aspects of public works. During the last two years of their program, students may pursue several areas of civil engineering or, depending upon their interests, more specialized courses in one or more of the specific technical areas listed below. All students must have a comprehensive design experience.

Civil engineering degree candidates must meet the academic requirements of the college and in addition must have an average GPA of 2.0 (C) in civil and architectural engineering courses attempted at this university.

Structural engineering: Analysis and design of structural systems including buildings, bridges, towers and other structures. Structural engineering also includes the study of solid mechanics and advanced structural materials.

Environmental engineering: Analysis, design and development of engineering systems to provide potable water supplies, treat municipal, industrial and hazardous wastes and protect human health and the environment.

Water resource engineering: Planning, analysis and design of hydraulic and hydrologic systems with respect to watersheds, municipalities, irrigation and drainage, and flood control. Conservation and management of groundwater and surface water are emphasized.

Transportation engineering: Planning, analysis and design of highways, traffic engineering and control, traffic safety, and pavement maintenance, design and rehabilitation.

Geotechnical engineering: Design and analysis of foundations, dams, embankments, slope stability and construction practices in soil and rock.

The civil engineering curriculum prepares the graduate to engage in professional practice, and upon completion of post-graduate requirements, to obtain registration as a Professional Engineer. It also provides the graduate with an excellent preparation for graduate studies in engineering, business or law.

International Engineering Option

Engineering is a global profession and today's engineers must be able to work and interact in a variety of diverse cultural and technical environments. The international engineering option gives civil engineering students an opportunity to study culture and foreign language at the same time as they pursue their engineering degrees.

The option includes at least one semester of study abroad with courses taken in a foreign language. In addition, students may participate in a four-to-five month international internship. Foreign language skills can be earned through a variety of means, including formal university coursework, intensive summer language programs, and previous education.

Foreign language education and the study-abroad experience satisfy the cultural context requirements of the University Studies Program.

Civil Engineering Objectives

  • CE Objectives Three to six years after graduation, graduates of the University of Wyoming Civil Engineering Program will:
  • CE-OB1 Be able to successfully practice the profession of Civil Engineering.
  • CE-OB2 Be prepared and motivated to accept challenging assignments and responsibilities.
  • CE-OB3 Demonstrate successful career growth. 

CE Outcomes

University of Wyoming Civil Engineering graduates shall:

  • CE-OT01 Solve problems in mathematics (through differential equations), in calculus-based physics, chemistry, and one additional area of science, and in engineering science.
  • CE-OT02 Design or select a civil engineering laboratory test to meet a need; conduct the test, and analyze and interpret the results.
  • CE-OT03 Design a complex system or process to meet desired needs within constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, constructability, and sustainability.
  • CE-OT04 Function effectively as a member of a multi-disciplinary team.
  • CE-OT05 Solve well-defined engineering problems in four technical areas in Civil Engineering.
  • CE-OT06 Analyze a complex situation involving conflicting professional and ethical interests, to determine an appropriate course of action.
  • CE-OT07 Develop and deliver effective verbal, written, and graphical communications.
  • CE-OT08 Based on a broad education, determine the global, economic, environmental and societal impacts of a specific, relatively constrained engineering solution.
  • CE-OT09 Demonstrate the ability to learn independently, without the aid of formal instruction.
  • CE-OT10 Incorporate contemporary issues into the identification, formulation, and solution of engineering problems.
  • CE-OT11 Apply relevant techniques, skills, and engineering tools to solve problems.
  • CE-OT12 Explain key concepts and problem-solving processes used in management.
  • CE-OT13 Explain key concepts and problem-solving processes used in business, public policy, and public administration.
  • CE-OT14 Explain the role of the leader, leadership principles, and attitudes conducive to effective professional practice of civil engineers.

Civil Engineering Curriculum**

Suggested Course Sequence

Freshman Year: Fall

Hours

MATH 2200 [Q]

4

CHEM 1020 [PN]

4

First-Year Seminar [FYS]

3

ENGL 1010 [COM1]

3

CE 1000***

3

Total Hours

15

Freshman Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2205

4

COJO 2010 [COM2]

3

US and WY Constitutions [V]

3

CE 1010***

3

ES 2110

3

Total Hours

16

Sophomore Year: Fall

Hours

MATH 2210

4

ES 2120

3

ES 2410

3

CE 2070

3

CE 2000***

3

Total Hours

16

Sophomore Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2310

3

PHYS 1220 [PN]

4

ES 2310

3

ES 2330

3

STAT 2050

4

Total Hours 17
Junior Year: Fall

Hours

Science Elective*

3

CE 3200

3

CE 3210

3

CE 3300

3

CE 3000***

3

USP 2015 [H]

3

Total Hours

18

Junior Year: Spring

Hours

CE 3400

3

CE 3500

3

CE 3600

3

CE 3010***

3

USP 2015 [H]

3

Total Hours

15

Senior Year: Fall

Hours

CE 4250 or CE 4260

3

Math/Science elective*

3

Professional development electives*

6

CE 4020***, 4030***, 4040***, 4050***, 4060***, or 4070*** [COM3]

4

Total Hours

16

Senior Year: Spring

Hours

Math/Science/Technical electives*

9

Professional development electives*

6

Total Hours

15

*To be selected from appropriate department-approved lists.
**All civil and architectural engineering classes require a grade of C or better (GPA 2.00) in prerequisite courses.
***Course under development. See department website at www.uwyo.edu/civil/ for more information.

International Engineering Option Curriculum

Freshman Year: Fall

Hours

MATH 2200 [Q]

4

CHEM 1020 [PN]

4

First-Year Seminar [FYS]

3

ENGL 1010 [COM1]

3

CE 1000***

2

Total Hours

16

Freshman Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2250

4

COJO 2010 [COM2]

3

US and WY Constitutions [V]

3

CE 1010***

3

ES 2110

3

Total Hours

16

Summer After Freshman Year

Hours

First-year foreign language I

4

First year-foreign language II

4

Total Hours

8

Sophomore Year: Fall

Hours

MATH 2210

4

ES 2120

3

Ce 2070

3

CE 2000***

3

Second-year foreign language I

4

Total Hours

17

Sophomore Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2310

3

ES 2310

3

CE 2010***

3

ES 2410

3

PHYS 1220 [PN]

4

Second-year foreign language II

3

Total Hours

19

Summer after Sophomore Year

Hours

Science Elective*

3

ES 2330

3

Total Hours

6

Junior Year: Study Abroad

Hours

CE 3000***

3

CE 3200

3

CE 3210

3

CE 3300

3

Total Hours

12

Junior Year: Internship

Hours

International Internship

3

Math/Science elective*

3

Total Hours

6

Senior Year: Fall

Hours

STAT 2050

3

CE 3010***

3

CE 3400

3

CE 3500

3

CE 3600

3

CE 4250 or CE 4260

3

Total Hours

18

Senior Year: Spring Hours
Math/Science/Technical Electives*

3

Prof. Development Electives*

12

CE 4020***, 4030***, 4040***, 4050***, 4060***, or 4070*** [COM3]

4

Total Hours

19

*To be selected from appropriate department-approved lists.
**All civil and architectural engineering classes require a grade of C or better (GPA 2.00) in prerequisite courses.
***Course under development. See department website at www.uwyo.edu/civil/ for more information.

Advanced Civil and Architectural Engineering Standing

All undergraduate students in Civil and Architectural Engineering must fulfill the Gateway Requirement prior to enrolling in any upper-division (3000-5000 level) courses taught in the College of Engineering and Applied Science.

To meet the Civil and Architectural Engineering Gateway Requirement, the student must earn a minimum of 57 Quality Points from any combination of the following seven classes or their equivalent. It is not necessary to complete all seven courses to fulfill the Gateway Requirement.

Gateway Courses

  • CHEM 1020 - General Chemistry I
  • PHYS 1210 or 1220 - Engineering Physics I or Engineering Physics II
  • MATH 2200 - Calculus I
  • MATH 2205 - Calculus II
  • ES 2110 - Statics
  • ES 2120 - Dynamics
  • ES 2410 - Mechanics of Materials

See the advising pages on the Civil and Architectural Engineering website for more information.

Graduate Study

Graduate Programs

An advanced degree in civil engineering is professionally and economically attractive. Advanced degrees are important for professional civil engineers in many specialized areas of civil engineering. Many consulting firms and industrial design groups require advanced knowledge gained from graduate studies. Engineers in such firms often work at the forefront of their profession. UW Alumni are involved in design and construction of major projects worldwide.

An advanced degree is also required for careers in university teaching and research. A university career is highly recommended for those motivated students who are interested in becoming leaders in education and in the development of new concepts, processes and inventions.

The Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering offers programs leading to the degrees of master of science and doctor of philosophy.  Areas of study in the M.S. and Ph.D. programs include:  building mechanical systems engineering, environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, transportation engineering, and water resources engineering.  The department also offers a master of science in environmental engineering in cooperation with the Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering.  Additional information is available from the department or from the Web page.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Admission is open to all students holding a bachelor's degree with at least a B average from an accredited engineering curriculum. A minimum GRE score of at least 150 on the verbal reasoning section and a score of at least 141 on the quantitative reasoning section is required, (for doctoral programs a score of at least 153 on the verbal reasoning section and a score of at least 144 on the quantitative reasoning section is required).

Ph.D. applicants are reviewed with regard to stated interests, objectives, and the ability of the department to provide a quality experience for the applicant.

International students must achieve a TOEFL score of 550 on the paper-based, a minimum of 76 on the internet-based, or a minimum of 60 on the IELTS.

MSCE Quick Start Program

The MSCE Quick Start program in Civil and Architectural Engineering (CAE) is designed to present highly qualified UW students with the opportunity to begin graduate study while they complete their bachelor of science (B.S.) degree in civil engineering or architectural engineering.  These students may apply for admission to the Quick Start program during the second semester of their junior year or during their senior year.

This program allows for early planning of the graduate portion of a student's education and provides more flexibility in the number of required courses and the order in which they are taken. The more efficient and better-planned use of time should result in reduction of the time required for obtaining the master of science in civil engineering (MSCE) degree.  Students who enter the Quick Start program must accept the primary responsibility for actively planning their programs of study to assure timely completion of their coursework and research programs.

The Quick Start program contains two essential elements:

Qualified students may receive provisional admission to the civil engineering graduate program prior to completing the normal application process.  This provisional admission will permit students to make their long-term educational plans earlier in their studies, thus providing enhanced opportunities for course selection and involvement in research.

Students in the program may apply up to 6 credit hours of 5000-level courses toward both the B.S. and M.S. degree programs. By completing successfully up to 6 credit hours of graduate classes during their senior year, these students will have demonstrated their ability to do graduate-level coursework as undergraduates, easing their transition to the civil engineering graduate program.

For additional information and an application form, please contact the CAE graduate program coordinator at (307) 766-2390 or stop by 3074 Engineering Building.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Master's Program

Areas of study in the master of science program include:  building mechanical systems engineering, environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, transportation engineering, and water resources engineering. The master of science degree in each of these areas requires completion of 12 to 18 hours of engineering courses related to the particular program area.

Plan A (thesis)

The degree of master of science, Plan A, requires a minimum of 26 hours of coursework and a minimum of 4 hours thesis research in addition to the minimum requirements set forth in this bulletin.

Early in the program, the student must submit a program of study listing coursework for approval by the departmental graduate studies committee (CEGS), and the department head.  The Office of the Registrar will load the approved program into CAPP.

Plan A is required of all state or contract supported graduate assistants.

Plan B (non-thesis)

Requires a minimum of 30 hours of coursework and a Plan B paper, in addition to the minimum requirements set forth in this bulletin.

Early in the program, the student must submit a program of study listing coursework and the course number that the Plan B paper covers for approval by the CEGS, the department head, and subsequently, the Office of the Registrar.

Doctoral Program

Areas of study in the doctor of philosophy program include: building mechanical systems engineering, environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, transportation engineering, and water resources engineering.

Minimum of 56 hours of coursework beyond the baccalaureate, 44 hours of which must be 5000-level (graduate-level) courses or the equivalent, and concentrated independent research leading to an acceptable dissertation.

In addition to expertise in the specific dissertation topic, the candidate must demonstrate competence in two or more research areas that will help to insure a high-quality dissertation acceptable to the student's graduate committee.

Subject to department and university requirements, the student's coursework is arranged by consultation between the student, his/her adviser, and his/her committee, and must also be approved by the CEGS and by the department head.

Coursework is defined in a program of study that should be filed by the end of the second semester of the Ph.D. program.

At a time near the completion of formal coursework, the student is required to take and pass a preliminary examination on the Ph.D. coursework and, as a part of the examination, is required to present a written and oral dissertation proposal to his/her committee for approval.

Finally, the student must demonstrate research competence in an oral defense of the dissertation and must submit an acceptable written version of the dissertation to his/her graduate committee in a timely manner to meet deadlines.  In addition, the student is to meet the minimum requirements set forth in this catalog.

Civil Engineering (CE) Courses

Architectural Engineering

Architectural Engineering is a rapidly expanding profession that deals with the myriad aspects of buildings and their design, construction and operation. Architectural engineers are typically specialists, responsible for the design and integration of such building elements as the structural, plumbing, fire protection, heating and air conditioning, or lighting and electrical systems. The curriculum in architectural engineering is designed to acquaint students with the various aspects of building design and construction and exposes them to a variety of courses dealing with different building materials and systems. The curriculum also includes course work in the humanities and social sciences, both to enrich the student's academic experience and assist in dealing with and contributing to society. The program leads to a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering, preparing graduates to engage in practice as Professional Engineers upon completion of post-graduate registration requirements. Graduate work with emphasis in Architectural Engineering leading to a Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered through the Civil and Mechanical Engineering Programs. Additionally, advanced study can also be pursued in allied areas such as architecture, business or other engineering fields.

Students choose an area of emphasis in either structural or mechanical systems and select courses from approved electives, usually beginning their elective sequence in the second semester of their junior year. Consult with the Civil and Architectural Engineering Department for current elective lists.

Civil engineering degree candidates must meet the academic requirements of the college and in addition must have an average GPA of 2.0 (C) in civil and architectural engineering courses attempted at this university.

Architectural Engineering Objectives

Three to six years after graduation, graduates of the University of Wyoming Civil Engineering Program will:

  • ARE-OB1 Be able to successfully practice the profession of Architectural Engineering.
  • ARE-OB2 Be prepared and motivated to accept challenging assignments and responsibilities.
  • ARE-OB3 Demonstrate successful career growth.

ARE Outcomes

University of Wyoming Architectural Engineering graduates shall:

  • ARE-OT01 Solve problems in mathematics (through differential equations), in probability and statistics, in calculus-based physics and general chemistry, and in engineering science.
  • ARE-OT02 Design or select an engineering laboratory test to meet a need; conduct the test, and analyze and interpret the results.
  • ARE-OT03 Design a complex system or process to meet desired needs within constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, constructability, and sustainability.
  • ARE-OT04 Function effectively as a member of a multi-disciplinary team.
  • ARE-OT05 Solve well-defined engineering problems in two technical areas in Architectural Engineering.
  • ARE-OT06 Analyze a complex situation involving conflicting professional and ethical interests, to determine an appropriate course of action.
  • ARE-OT07 Develop and deliver effective verbal, written, and graphical communications.
  • ARE-OT08 Based on a broad education, determine the global, economic, environmental and societal impacts of a specific, relatively constrained engineering solution.
  • ARE-OT09 Demonstrate the ability to learn independently, without the aid of formal instruction.
  • ARE-OT10 Incorporate contemporary issues into the identification, formulation, and solution of engineering problems.
  • ARE-OT11 Apply relevant techniques, skills, and engineering tools to solve problems.
  • ARE-OT12 Apply fundamental principles of architectural design to open-ended problems.
  • ARE-OT13 Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts in architectural history.
  • ARE-OT14 Be able to communicate and interact with design professionals in the building industry.

Architectural Engineering Curriculum*

Suggested Course Sequence.

Freshman and Sophomore years are the same for both options.

Freshman Year: Fall

Hours

MATH 2200 [Q]

4

CHEM 1020 [PN]

4

First-Year Seminar [FYS]

3

ENGL 1010 [COM1]

3

ARE 1000**

2

Total Hours

16

Freshman Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2205 [Q]

4

PHYS 1210 [PN]

4

ES 2110

3

COJO 2010 [COM2]

3

ARE 1600**

3

Total Hours

17

Sophomore Year: Fall

Hours

MATH 2210 [Q]

4

ES 2120

3

ES 2410

3

ARE 2000**

3

ARE 2600**

3

Total Hours

16

Sophomore Year: Spring

Hours

STAT 2050

4

ES 2310

3

ES 2330

3

ARE 2410

3

GEL 1100, 1500 or 1600

4

Total Hours

17

Structural Option

Junior Year: Fall

Hours

ARE 3000**

3

ART 3030 [H]

3

ARE 3600

3

ARE 3200

3

ES 2210

3

CE 3600

3

Total Hours

18

Junior Year: Spring

Hours

ARE 3210

3

ARE 4600

3

ARE 3300 or 3400

3

ARE 4260

3

MATH 2310

3

Total Hours

15

Senior Year: Fall

Hours

ARE 4200

3

ARE 4250

3

ARE Structural Option Elective***

3

US and WY Constitutions [V]

3

Math or Science Elective***

3

Total Hours

15

Senior Year: Spring

Hours

ARE 4720

4

ARE Structural Option Elective***

3

ARE Major Elective***

3

ARE General Elective***

3

UPS 2015 [H]

3

Total Hours

16

Mechanical Option

Junior Year: Fall

Hours

ART 3030 [H]

3

ARE 3600

3

ARE 3000**

3

ARE 3400

3

ES 2210

3

ARE 3200

3

Total Hours

18

Junior Year: Spring

Hours

ARE 3210

3

ARE 4600

3

ARE 4430 or 4490

3

ARE 3300

3

MATH 2310

3

Total Hours

15

Senior Year: Fall

Hours

ARE Major Elective***

3

ARE 3360

3

ARE Mechanical Option Elective***

3

US and WY Constitutions [V]

3

Math or Science Elective

3

Total Hours

15

Senior Year: Spring

Hours

ARE 4740

4

ARE 4430 or 4490

3

ARE Major Elective***

3

USP 2015 [H]

3

ARE General Elective***

3

Total Hours

16

*All civil and architectural engineering classes require a grade of C (GPA 2.00) or better in prerequisite courses.

**Course under development. See department website at www.uwyo.edu/civil/ for more information.

***To be selected from Department approved lists for elective courses. See department website at www.uwyo.edu/civil/ for more information.

Advanced Civil and Architectural Engineering Standing

All undergraduate students in Civil and Architectural Engineering must fulfill the Gateway Requirement prior to enrolling in any upper-division (3000-5000 level) courses taught in the College of Engineering and Applied Science.

To meet the Civil and Architecturl Engineering Gateway Requirement, the student must earn a minimum of 57 Quality Points from any combination of the following seven classes or their equivalent. It is not necessary to complete all seven courses to fulfill the Gateway Requirement.

Gateway Courses

  • CHEM 1020 - General Chemistry I
  • PHYS 1210 or 1220 - Engineering Physics I or Engineering Physics II
  • MATH 2200 - Calculus I
  • MATH 2205 - Calculus II
  • ES 2110 - Statics
  • ES 2120 - Dynamics
  • ES 2410 - Mechanics of Materials

See the advising pages on the Civil and Architectural Engineering website for more information.

Architectural Engineering (ARE) Courses

Land Surveying

A minor in Land Surveying requires 31 hours of specific course work. This minor meets the Wyoming Board of Registration for Professional Engineers and Professional Land Surveyor’s surveying education requirements for eligibility as a Land Surveyor in Training. The Land Surveying minor may be paired with any major. With the exception of CE 2070, all classes are offered distance learning through Outreach Credit Programs.

Land Surveying Minor Curriculum Requirements:

Course Hours
LS 2110 3
CE 2070 or LS 2010 and LS 2015 3
LS 3130 3
LS 3100 2
LS 2400 2
LS 2020 4
ENTK 2500* 3
LS 3200 3
LS 3210 4
LS 3120 2
LS 3110 2
Total Hours 31

*Computer Aided Drafting I offered through Sheridan College Outreach Program.

Land Surveying (LS) Courses

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