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Art and Art History Program

Department of Visual & Literary Arts

Visual Arts Building, Room 110

Hours: 8 am - 5 pm (Academic Year)

7:30 am - 4:30 pm (Summer)

1000 E. University Ave.

Dept. 3138

Laramie, WY 82070

Phone: (307) 766-3269

Email: faoffice@uwyo.edu

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Art and Art History Program

Carly Slade

Visiting Assistant Professor: Ceramics

Email: cslade@uwyo.edu 

Website: www.CarlySlade.com

Instagram: @CarlySlade

Office: VA 118

B.F.A., Alberta University of the Arts, 2010
M.F.A., San Jose State University, 2016

 

About

Carly Slade grew up in "Big sky" Alberta, Canada. Her work is influenced by her blue-collar roots and plagued by a concern for the precarious nature of the working class. Using a mix of materials (most often including clay, embroidery, and commercial building supplies), Slade creates dioramas of real places in an unreal perspective. Slade has exhibited widely throughout the USA and Canada, including solo shows at Greenwich House Pottery in NYC, Baltimore Clayworks and The Clay Studio in Philadelphia. She has work in the collections of the Nerman Museum and Archie Bray Foundation. She currently holds the position of Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Wyoming where she is coordinator of the Ceramics program.

 

 

Artist Statement

I have observed that there is impermanence in our lives spent in the buildings we inhabit and work in, and I am frightened by the precarious nature of the working class. I think a lot about people, and a lot about the spaces they inhabit. People in each other’s space, spaces after people have left, about who makes the space, people who lost their space; about what they left behind there, or maybe took with them. I am interested in space as both an archive and a façade.

Buildings and the spaces they occupy are vessels, they hold within them residue of the lives that have passed through them, while their outsides are reflections of their time and place. Each brick was placed by someone’s hands, the foundation poured by a crew, porch lights glow from the effort of an electrician. Once a structure is built it becomes like a book with blank pages, ready to be marked and altered to hold its history. The front banister was bent when the second owner backed his car into it. The ornate moulding around the front door is original to the home, covered with eight layers of paints and now out of place now in its rundown neighbourhood. But it hints back to a time when the houses were new, the jobs were union, the hope was palpable.

I understand the buildings in the city I grew up in, and I could probably interpret the ones in my province. But when I left Canada, I became an observer. The USA has a history that I know the basics of, but there is so much more regional history I am missing. As I move across the States, I use the buildings like markers which I try to interpret. I’m always an outsider looking in, trying to understand the social and economic constructs that I have landed in. Yellow lawns in California signalled drought, seemingly countless Mexican restaurants spoke of colonization and immigration, and astronomical rent spoke of the tech boom whose fingers of gentrification had begun to spread cubist concrete boxes. Montana was all sky, dotted with the occasional wood panelled corner bar. Kansas was divided down political lines, Dems in the city, Republicans in the country. Philadelphia was covered in garbage, and the roads muddled with potholes. Signs of a large city in poverty with failing public service. A choice made by a few to focus on the wants of small faction over the greater good. It is visually the most aggressive city I have lived in. But if you look up the cornices crowning the rowhouses you will see that the city was once booming. It was once a manufacturing hub. As you walk past marble stoops you can imagine what life was like before the corner store was shuttered, back when there wasn’t boarded up homes and empty lots. In Philly’s architecture I can also read hope and resilience. In its people I felt pride, kinship and an attitude of DIY urbanism. From where I sat each night on my old worn marble stoop I saw the signs of change. Those empty lots are beginning to fill with new homes for new families to make their own impression, but at what cost?

 

Samples of Work:

      

 

Contact Us

Art and Art History Program

Department of Visual & Literary Arts

Visual Arts Building, Room 110

Hours: 8 am - 5 pm (Academic Year)

7:30 am - 4:30 pm (Summer)

1000 E. University Ave.

Dept. 3138

Laramie, WY 82070

Phone: (307) 766-3269

Email: faoffice@uwyo.edu

Find us on Facebook (Link opens a new window)

1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071
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