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Civil and Architectural Engineering|College of Engineering and Applied Science

FAQ's about Advising

FAQ Topics:


General
Q: Where can I find the information I need for advising?
A: Several places.
First: the CAE (Civil and Architectural Engineering) Curriculum web page, http://www.uwyo.edu/civil/curriculum/advising/.
Second: your advisor.
Third: the Department Head,
Fourth: your friends. Be careful with the last, they aren't signing your degree check.
Be sure to read the General Notes on Advising.

Q: Who is my advisor?
A: It is located on WYOWEB http://wyoweb.uwyo.edu

Q: Where do I find my advisor?
A: Check his/her office, class rooms, leave a message in the CAE office, send an email. Email is a pretty good way to contact a professor, they may be out of town, in meetings, teaching, doing research, advising, etc. and they will still get an email.

Q: What do I need for Advising?
A: Several things. Have an idea how you are doing in your classes this semester and tell your advisor. If you even think you may be flunking a course or getting a D in a prerequisite course, let your advisor know that. Be realistic. It may mean getting into the courses you need when you need them.
Second, come in with a schedule that you think will work for you. Your advisor is just that, your advisor. He/she is not responsible for telling you what classes to take. It is up to you to know what courses you will need in the future. You will find that in the curriculum sheets for each program in the department, located in:
http://www.uwyo.edu/civil/curriculum/advising/
In fact, it's a good idea to line up the courses you need to take for a couple of semesters. You will need to do just that when you fill out your degree check several semesters before your final semester. Remember, you are responsible for your own education, not your advisor. It is up to you to know what courses you need so you can ask your advisor appropriate questions.
Don't walk into your advising session and say "I don't know what courses I need. What should I take?" Your advisor will probably recommend you re-sign up for a later date after you have taken the time to see what you need.
After advising, you will get a two part form called a "Course Request Form." It needs to be filled out and signed by your advisor. It then goes into your academic file.

Q: What's a Degree Check?
A: When you have 50 hours or less to complete your degree requirements, talk to your advisor about filling out a Degree Check. (Don't wait for your advisor to talk to you.) This lists the courses you have taken, the courses you are currently taking and the courses you will take to graduate. When everything checks out, you will sign it, your advisor will sign it, it will go to the department head and he/she will sign it, and finally it will be reviewed by the Dean's office. When everyone signs off, it becomes the contract for you to graduate.

Q: Can I change my Degree Check?
A: If your course requirements change, you will need to change your degree check and only your advisor can do that. He/she will have to send a email to the Dean's office explaining the reason for the change and what consequences it will have on your graduation.

Q:  Why am I here?
A:  Your choice, Everything in life (but life) is optional.

Q: I got a "D" in ....., Do I have to take the course over?
A: Maybe. Any course that is a prerequisite course, or a course shown as a co-requisite course and taken prior to the subsequent course, must be retaken. Therefore, if the course is the last in a sequence, it does not have to be retaken. For example, if you get a "D" in ES2410, you must retake it before you take CE3200. If you get a "D" in CE4260, you don't have to retake it to take CE4200. You would have to retake it to take CE5260.

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Freshman Year

Q:  Can a student substitute Physics I (Physics 1210) for Physics II (Physics 1220)?
A:  No.  Physics II was specifically selected because it provides the Thermo and Circuits that our students often need help on or do not take.  It now provides the sole exposure our CE students have to circuits.  Therefore, they are not interchangeable.

Q:  Can a student take Physics II (Physics 1220) without taking Physics I (Physics 1210) first?
A:   It been long established that a student can move into Physics II without taking Physics I. The Physics department has approved this.

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Sophomore Year

Q:  Can students take other survey courses via Outreach and have them count toward the CE degree?
A:  Yes, see the Technical Elective and Professional Development Elective lists.

Q:  Can a student substitute ARE 2100 for CE2100?
A: Yes.

Q:  Can a student substitute CE 2100 for ARE 2100?
A:  No.

Q: Can I substitute some CAD courses for CE2100?
A: No, CAD is only a portion of the course, which covers the field of Civil Engineering. If you have substantial experience in CE design work using CAD, file a petition with the Curriculum Committee.

Q: I've had several semesters of CAD at my community college. Can I use those courses anywhere?
A: If you have had two or more college level CAD classes, you may use the second class as a Math, Science, Tech, PDE Elective. Maximum of 3 hours.

Q:  Are CE 2070 and ES 2410 a strict prerequisite for CE 2100?
A:  No, they are both co-requisites, meaning you can take them at the same time as CE2100.

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Junior Year

Q:  What do I need to do to plan my CDE?
A:  Start earlier, sometime near the first semester of your junior year.  As you take the junior level (3XXX) courses, think about what area in which you would like to do more work.

Q:  Can I take the 3000-level courses in any order?
A:  Yes, start with courses from area that you think might be most interested in at the 4000-level.  Also, consider that several 4000-level courses are not offered every semester, so plan your prerequisite experience.  Finally, consider the CDE semester and work backward.  You may not have the experience to make a lot of these choices; this is an excellent topic to discuss with your advisor.

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Senior Year

Q:  What do I need to do to plan my CDE?
A:  Start earlier, sometime near the first semester of your junior year.  As you take the junior level (3XXX) courses, think about what area in which you would like to do more work.

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University Studies Program (USP)

Q:  How is USP oral requirement satisfied in CE?
There are two ways to satisfy the USP 2003 requirement in CE. One is to take COJO 1010. The second is to take ES1000, CE2100 and the Comprehensive Design Experience (CDE). All three are required courses (except if you have taken another, similar 1000 course or have transferred into the University.)

Q:  How is the USP oral requirement satisfied in ARE?
There are two ways to satisfy the USP 2003 requirement in ARE. One is to take COJO 1010. The second is to take ES1000, ARE3600 and the Comprehensive Design Experience (CDE). All three are required courses (except if you have taken another, similar 1000 course or have transferred into the University.)

Q: What are the G and D requirements and do I really have to take them?
A: They are the Global and Diversity requirements for the University Studies Program. Certain courses on the USP list have one or the other coupled with a CA, CS, CH or C course. They are listed in the bulletin and the schedule. Have to take them? Only if you want to graduate. Careful selection of your USP courses will keep you from having to take extra courses, usually in your senior year.

Q:  What is the best way to obtain the USP WB requirement?
A:  Take CE 3210.

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Math, Science, Tech Electives

Q: Can ES 2210 (circuits) be used as a technical elective in CE?
A: Yes

Q:  Do PDE's count as technical electives?
A:  Yes, indeed.

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Professional Development Electives (PDE's)

Q:  Why do we need ARE/CE 4200 for structural design courses?
A:  Structural analysis is an important component of design.  One course in analysis is not sufficient upon which to found a design career.

Q:  Do PDE's count as technical electives?
A:  Yes, indeed.

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Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Exam / (Engineer in Training [EIT] Exam)

Q:  When do I take the FE?
A: During the last two semesters before you graduate.

Q: What is the FE Exam?
A: The Fundamentals of Engineering Exam is a national examination published by the NCEES (National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying) to verify you have attended the minimum requirements for your degree. It has two parts: the general exam in the morning covers primarily the Engineering Science courses while the major specific exam in the afternoon covers primarily the junior level courses.

Q:  Do you have review sessions?  For what topics?
A:  Tau Beta PI (The Engineering Honorary Society) hosts the review sessions for the morning exam. The CAE department covers review sessions for the CE specific portion of the exam.

Q:  Do you suggest that ARE student take the FE in civil or general?
A:  Either but most UW structural ARE students take the civil portion, while the mechanical ARE students may take the Civil, the Mechanical or the General exam. (The general exam covers more of the ES course material in greater depth. It has a lower pass rate than the CE exam.)

Q:  How do I prepare for the civil exam?
A:  Attend the review sessions, study the Reference Guide you are given when you register for the FE, and maybe read the FE reference manuals. These are solution books which have old problems worked out. Several may be available at the bookstore, or check the web.

Q:  What references do you recommend?
A:  Your text books.

Q:  Why do I need to take the FE?
A:  It is a requirement for graduation. It is the first step in your gaining Professional registration, i.e., your PE license.

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If you have suggestions for additional FAQ's, please email Rhonda Young.

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