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Mary Jo Cooley Hidecker

Ph.D., M.S., M.A., CCC-A/SLP

Department of Communication Disorders

University of Wyoming

Department 3311

1000 E. University Ave.

Laramie, WY 82071

Dr. Mary Jo Cooley Hidecker

Current Research

Welcome to my All About Communication (AAC) Lab!

Our All About Communication (AAC) Lab works on a variety of communication projects each year.

The following projects are currently being conducted in the research lab by Dr. Hidecker and her team of student research assistants. If you have any questions or comments about a particular project, please feel free to contact us!

Creating instruments to use in epidemiology and clinical studies

Development and dissemination of the Communication Function Classification System (CFCS). The CFCS can be used with children and adults who have cerebral palsy. CFCS translations continue to be initiated by professionals and researchers who want to use the CFCS in their native language. CFCS translations can be downloaded from my CFCS website www.cfcs.us.

Autism Classification of Social Function: Social Communication (ACSF:SC) We have developed a classification system ACSF:SC that provides researchers and clinicians across disciplines with descriptions of social functioning for preschoolers with autism. Now working on expanding the ACSF:SC to toddlers and school-aged children with autism, Dr. Hidecker is a co-investigator with Canadian researchers at McMaster University and University of Alberta.

Using instruments to increase understanding of functional communication

This project is expanding the use of the CFCS to adults and adolescents with cerebral palsy. The expansion is working to incorporate the CFCS with the GMFCS (2), MACS (3), and Rotterdam Transition Profile (4).

(1)— Communication Function Classification System (CFCS): The purpose of the CFCS is to classify the everyday communication performance of an individual into one of the five levels. Distinctions between levels are based on the performance of sender and receiver roles, the pace of communication, and the type of conversational partner. The CFCS focuses on activity and participation levels as described in the World Health Organization’s (WHO) International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) www.cfcs.us

(2)—Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS): This system is used to assess self-initiated movement, specifically things like mobility, sitting, transfers, etc. The individual gross motor functions must be assessed considering the movement and its significance to the individual’s everyday life. https://www.canchild.ca/en/resources/42-gross-motor-function-classification-system-expanded-revised-gmfcs-e-r

(3)—Manual Ability Classification System (MACS): The purpose of this tool is to measure how children with cerebral palsy can use their hands when using objects necessary for daily activity. The assessment is made to define the child’s typical manual performance, and not their maximum performance. http://www.macs.nu/

(4)—Rotterdam Transitional Profile: This profile is created by determining an individual’s transition from one phase of life to another. This assessment can include a change in environment, a move towards independence in work, developing intimate relationships, living on their own, making their own choices, etc. http://www.erasmusmc.nl/Reva/Research/transition/RotterdamTransitionProfilev0.2

Our research team is collaborating with McMaster University, the University of Michigan, and the University of New Mexico for this project.

Another project is expanding the use of the CFCS to other populations. We are currently analyzing data from ELGAN, comparing the communication measures used with ten-year-olds who were born very premature.

Using telehealth to address rural health disparities

Rural Coordinated Care for Parkinson’s disease This feasibility study of telehealth is providing exercise, speech therapy, and medication management to people with Parkinson's disease in rural areas, specifically in Wyoming and Nevada. Please contact us to determine if you are eligible to participate. Dr. Hidecker is part of a multidisciplinary, community-based research team including researchers at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas.

 

© Copyright 2018. Hidecker Research. All rights reserved.

Contact Us

Mary Jo Cooley Hidecker

Ph.D., M.S., M.A., CCC-A/SLP

Department of Communication Disorders

University of Wyoming

Department 3311

1000 E. University Ave.

Laramie, WY 82071

1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071
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