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Latest work

Wyoming Pathways from Prison officially kicked off in 2016, and it has been a busy start!  During our first 18 months, we successfully:

  • Built a strong foundational partnership with the Wyoming Department of Corrections

  • Fostered relationships with various educational institutions, academic departments and faculty, as well as other supporting and funding organizations (see our Partners and Support page for more)

  • Applied for and received grant-based funding

  • Acquired instructional technology upgrades for the Wyoming Women’s Center classrooms

  • Received the Correctional Education Association's 2017 Austin MacCormick Award for best practices in correctional education that can be implemented nationwide

  • Published of a collection of incarcerated women’s writing in a special edition of Wagadu: Journal of Transnational Gender & Women’s Studies (2017) based on work completed with 10 UW students, Susan Dewey, and Bonnie Zare at the women’s prison in summer 2016 (available online)

  • Provided a wide range of amazing on-site and distance learning opportunities to Wyoming inmates (showcased below)


Summer 2017: Tutorial Instruction (EDUC 2105)

The fall 2016 version of the tutorial education course Wyoming Pathways from Prison coordinator Katy Brock offered at the Wyoming Women’s Center (WWC) was so well-received that Brock decided, in cooperation with the Department of Corrections to add a research component to a summer 2017 version of the class. As part of the class, Brock collected student work and comments – after obtaining participants’ consent and removing all names and identifying information – to help design a manual to assist incarcerated people with becoming peer tutors. Wyoming Pathways from Prison coordinator Dr. Susan Dewey and UW students Kyria Brown and Devon Thompson, along with coordinator Alec Muthig providing remote instruction, assisted Brock with the summer 2017 course at the WWC.

inmate students studying class material

“I’ve taken time doing this, to read carefully and highlight. My tutor would stop me and say “whoa, what did you just read?” And I go back and read it. I just got a brand-new book and it was cool to be able to read and really be able to explain it to my roommate.”

“I actually like the fact that I’m doing my GED in here because in regular high school you don’t get help one-on-one like you do here.”

“I’ve learned quite a bit with my tutor, who helps me break down the information. I learned that I have to reread sometimes.”

"It’s not laziness that keeps us from graduating high school, it is not getting the help we need.”


Summer 2017: Stoic Camp

In summer 2017, Dr. Robert Colter (UW Department of Philosophy), Alec Muthig (WPfP coordinator), and UW philosophy graduate students Cody Mehrer and Jordan Seaver offered this intensive weeklong introduction to Stoic philosophy and its practical application to men incarcerated at the Wyoming Honor Conservation Camp and Wyoming Boot Camp. Incarcerated students read, critically analyzed, and discussed core Stoic texts, including Epictetus’ Enchridion and Marcus Aurelius’ Meditations, and then applied Stoic principles through daily practical exercises.

This Stoic Camp, based on a program held every summer by the UW Department of Philosophy, provided an avenue for critical reflection, discussion, and practice of philosophical principles and acted as a pilot for future similar programming.

Stoic texts

“This camp made some very basic, very useful concepts accessible to a degree I haven’t been able to manage on my own. It gave me a firm anchor point to work from.”

“What I found most valuable was the opportunity … to broaden our horizons and our perspectives on life and the natural world. I thank you from the bottom of my heart for your time and energies and the fact that you remembered those of us who thought we were forgotten.”

“This program has sparked a huge interest in me to read more and learn more.”

“I will endeavor to utilize some of the information I have received in my everyday life.”


Spring 2017: Introduction to Social Work and Women’s Empowerment: Navigating Social Structures for Success (ENGL 1490)

In the spring 2017 semester, Dr. Susan Dewey supervised UW undergraduate students Khamis Peoples, Kathie Beasley, and Helen Heywood in the development and delivery of this remote instruction course. This seven week class provided an introduction to social work practices as well as to social structures in society, how they are best understood and, when managed, how they can advance women’s social standing. Students learned to critically engage with current social work practices, social structures, and social systems as they pertain to women’s lives while engaging in practical skill-building in the areas of continuing education, self-care, and financial management.


Spring 2017: Women in Society (topics 1490)

For 5 weeks in spring 2017, Wyoming Pathways from Prison coordinator Katy Brock and two UW undergraduate students led a distance learning course for women incarcerated at the Wyoming Women’s Center (WWC). This course focused on exploring the social and emotional journeys that women and their children experience through engagement with non-fiction and fiction texts as a means to facilitate critical and analytical skill development.


Fall 2016: Tutorial Instruction (EDUC 2105)

During the fall of 2016 Katy Brock, Wyoming Pathways from Prison co-coordinator, developed and taught a tutorial education course for the women incarcerated at Wyoming Women’s Center (WWC). The purpose of the work was to train incarcerated women the fundamentals of educational tutoring, so they can tutor other incarcerated women who are working toward their high school equivalency, involved in vocational training, or interested in family literacy practices. The women were taught comprehension strategies, vocabulary development, and writing instruction.

“At first I thought (the class) was simply going to help me become a teacher. After taking this class, I have learned way more than that. I have gained a lot of communication skills, conflict resolution skills, comprehension skills… the list could go on & on!”

“Thank you for giving us the opportunity to learn new skills to help one another. We’ve enjoyed your instruction and your personal input as well as everything you’ve brought to this class.”


Summer 2016: Telling My Story: Voices from The Wyoming Women’s Center (WMST 4540 Women, Crime, and The Law)

For three weeks over the summer of 2016, Dr. Susan Dewey (Wyoming Pathways from Prison co-coordinator) and Dr. Bonnie Zare provided an intensive learning experience to both University of Wyoming students and incarcerated women at the Wyoming Women's Center.

This course involved collaborative work between University of Wyoming (UW) students/faculty and Wyoming Women’s Center (WWC) students to draft, revise, and prepare original work for publication in a special edition of Wagadu: Journal of Transnational Gender & Women’s Studies.  In memoir, a unique storytelling form, a writer’s experiences take center stage as she recounts a series of events that played a formative role in her life. Following Wyoming Department of Corrections oversight and protocols, this class brought together UW students and faculty to help WWC students write a memoir for publication. Each class included substantial discussion of assigned excerpts from women’s published memoirs as well as time to develop and receive supportive feedback on works-in-progress.

Image of correctional facility sign
Image of class group

"This experience has given me back my life and joy. I’m so blessed to receive an education."

"Thank you for taking the time to teach us and help us be better writers and people. You have helped me a lot. I’m very grateful. It has pushed me to go to school when I get out soon and not give up. Thanks again."

"Thank you so much for all your kindness and willingness to help us all. I know that you have given me the courage to speak about my story. This class gave us the skills to move forward. I know that I’m blessed to be part of this group of strong and talented women. There are no words that can describe how much I appreciate the time, energy, and pure joy you all put into us."


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Wyoming Pathways from Prison

1000 E. University Ave.

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: 307-766-3427

Email: sdewey3@uwyo.edu

1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071
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