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Honors Courses | Fall 2020

Registration Guidelines

Main campus Honors College fall courses will open to non-Honors College students on Friday, May 1. Non-Honors College student wishing to register for these courses need to have at least a 3.25 cumulative UW GPA and will need to request an override from the Honors College. Students should email Cass Tolman at ctolman2@uwyo.edu to make this request. Online Honors classes are open to all students.

Meeting times, locations, CRNs, specific section numbers, are all listed in WyoRecords under the “Look Up Classes” search function. 

Pre-Requisites: All Honors Upper-Division Classes (3000 and 4000 level) require students to have completed their COM 1 and COM 2 requirements.

Advising Note: Honors Advisors are available to meet with you via distance communication this semester! Emailing honorsadvising@uwyo.edu is the best way to get in touch with us. We will then work with you to answer your questions via email or to set up a phone, Zoom or other platform communication.

*The group Honors Advising sessions previously scheduled for March 25th and March 26th were cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Advising Guidance Powerpoint

 

Course Descriptions


HP 1020:  Honors Colloquium I
REQUIRED FOR ALL FIRST-YEAR HONORS STUDENTS*
*A first-year student is any student who begins at UW with fewer than 30 post high school college credit hours.  Students who earned an associate’s degree while completing their high school degree are still considered first-year students.
Instructor: Various 
Honors College Attributes: Colloquium 1
USP attributes: (COM1) Communication 1
A&S attributes: none
HP 1020 is the first course in the Colloquium sequence.
The first-year Colloquium is a required two-semester sequence of courses that takes the complex topic of Dreams and Reality and explores it with readings based in the humanities, arts, sciences, and social sciences. The courses builds community in the Honors College while promoting high levels of academic achievement. In the Colloquium, students push themselves to become stronger critical thinkers. They weigh and consider multiple points of view; they develop thoughtful, well-supported perspectives on important issues of our times; and they defend their ideas in public presentations.
 
Colloquium is enriched with visits to UW’s Theatre and Dance department, Art Museum, Archives, and Library, and with service projects carried out around Laramie. Expert faculty from various departments give specialized lectures on relevant topics. Distinguished visiting scholars and writers meet with students to discuss their work. In all these ways, Colloquium teaches students to take advantage of the rich resources we are privileged to have at UW.

 

HP 1101: FYS: Travel Writing
Instructor: Paul Bergstraesser
Honors College Attributes: none
USP attributes: (FYS) First-Year Seminar
A&S attributes: none
“True travels and the inquiry of the essayist,” states travel writer Paul Theroux, “require the simpler stratagems of being humble, patient, solitary, anonymous, and alert.”  In this course, you will be asked to explore your “traveling self” as well as refine your skills as a writer.  We will study the essays of such writer/travelers as Pico Iyer, Gary Shteyngart, Andrea Lee, and Colson Whitehead, whose work stretches from Las Vegas to Bombay.  We will also look closely at the act of writing nonfiction, focusing on its analytical and creative techniques.  Through a series of trips based on and off campus (to the Art Museum, to Laramie, to Southeast Wyoming) and a slate of activities (essays, interviews, a travel video) you will learn to define yourself as a traveler and enrich your life experience through travel.    
 

HP 1101: FYS: Calling BullS#!% In a Science-Driven World 

Instructor: Patrick Kelley
Honors College Attributes: none
USP attributes: (FYS) First-Year Seminar
A&S attributes: none
Science depends on thoughtful collection, analysis, and interpretation of quality data. If not handled responsibly and transparently, data can yield bull$#!% science. Our primary goal will be to learn to identify bull$#!% in our scientific environment, namely in the publication, reporting, interpretation, and application. During this course, we will seek out, define, and quantify the amount of scientific bull$#!% (relative to non-bull$#!%) in an attempt to understand if the rate of accumulating bull$#!% is causing irreversible damage to science. We will work to investigate the nature of mistakes, obfuscations, and other types of bull$#!% in science and its reporting. We will explore topics such as publication bias, meta-analyses and multiple working hypotheses, statistical traps, data blinding, as well as the increased focus on Big Data and data visualizations that impact how people view the scientific process. We will engage with scientific articles, topic reviews, and popular press articles and spend much time thinking about the data that surround us (e.g. social interactions, movement patterns of students and other animals, instructor behavior, eating habits) to understand what data are. Students will design and execute original research on data bull$#!% and present this work as a conference-style poster. Students will be exposed to data processing (to gain an understanding of basic data informatics, i.e. what it means to collect and organize data. Students will gain an appreciation for formal scientific research as well as an understanding of how scientific research careers develop.

 

HP 3151: Indian Short Story
Instructor: Nina McConigley
Honors College Attributes: Honors Non-Western. Note: Students who have already completed their Honors Non-Western requirement may use this course as an Honors upper-division elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: none
The short story in India has old and epic roots. From Indian folktales to Rabindranath Tagore, and now to the modern Indian story of the Diaspora – the short story has been used to tell the story of India for centuries.  

In this class, we will focus on the form of the short story by writers of South Asian (Indian) decent. Using the lens of the short story, we will examine how these writers explore gender, class, religious, and other differences in India and beyond. Beginning with folktales and looking at writers from India (including works translated into English), we will examine a rich array of the Indian experience. Moving out from India, we will look at the experiences of the migrant, the Indian writer grappling with immigration and diaspora in countries like England, the United States, Sri Lanka, South Africa, Trinidad and Tanzania.  

We will also examine the historical contexts and cultural forces that shape Indian identity as it is represented in the form of the short story.

 

HP 3151: Chinese Medicine and Models of Healthcare
Instructor: Chris Dewey
Honors College attributes: Honors Non-Western. Note: Students who have already completed their Honors Non-Western requirement may use this course as an Honors upper-division elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
Pre-Requisite: Students must have introductory coursework in Anatomy or Physiology in order to take this class. For questions, please contact the instructor at chris.p.dewey@gmail.com.
On offer here is a class that examines Traditional Chinese Medicine as an integral component of contemporary models of health care. Students will learn from a practicing Chinese Medicine clinician about evidence-based practice, the theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine, its modalities including acupuncture, how it is used to treat disease, and the diagnostic tools we use in a clinical setting. Students will also participate in a typical client intake and observe a full acupuncture treatment. Together we will examine what it means to use Chinese Medicine in service of the consumer’s journey to wellness. The nuanced and abstruse lexicon used by practitioners in any branch of health care, combined with the ways in which Eastern and Western care paradigms differ from each other, can be confusing and alienating to both practitioners and consumers alike. The course will help to dispel the confusion and division that can exist between seemingly different models of health care and demonstrate the value of integrated medicine to health, healing and wellness.

 

HP 3151: Classical Islam, ONLINE
Instructor: Erin Abraham
Honors College Attributes: Honors Non-Western. Note: Students who have already completed their Honors Non-Western requirement may use this course as an Honors upper-division elective
USP attributes:
(H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: (G) Global
This course provides a survey of Classical Islam, from the rise of the Abbasid caliphate in 750 to the Mongol conquest of Baghdad in 1285.  Often described as the Golden Age of Islam, this was a period of remarkable achievements in science, mathematics, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as law and religion. Using primary and secondary sources, we will explore the rich history of this cosmopolitan age through several themes, including religious and legal developments within Islam; inter-faith relations and diplomacy; social structures, with emphasis on status and gender; and the cultural and intellectual spheres of literature, science, philosophy, medicine, and art.   We will also examine the ways these achievements influenced the wider medieval world and the role that they continue to play in modern society. 

HP 3151: Modern Japanese Society and Culture, ONLINE 
Instructor: Noah Miles
Honors College Attributes: Honors Non-Western. Note: Students who have already completed their Honors Non-Western requirement may use this course as an Honors upper-division elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: (G) Global
This course is designed to introduce Japanese society and culture.  The class will take a thematic approach to the study of Japan.  We will integrate history and literature from the Jomon to the Edo periods, covering a diverse range of topics including: language development, the introduction of Buddhism, poetry, classical and modern literature, traditional arts and holidays concluding with the development of popular culture.

HP 3152: Race and Racism
Instructor: Steven Bialostok
Honors College Attributes: Upper-division elective
USP attributes:
(H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: (D) Diversity
This course is framed by a simple contradiction. Race is a myth, yet it is quite real. Racial categories are rooted in history and culturally constructed through laws, the media, and various institutions. Yet, what makes race real? What animates it with so much power, and fosters its tenacious hold on much of the Western world’s collective psyche?

In this course, we explore race and racism in both its historical construction and its contemporary manifestation as a crucial aspect of American culture and an integral component of people’s identity. Class time will consist of lectures (including guest lecturers), small and large group discussions, watching documentaries and clips from television, movies, and YouTube.

Everyday thinking about race (and racism) in America is almost entirely emotionally laden, even when we are certain that our assertions are logical and rational. Work in cognitive anthropology, psychology, and political science reveal that our “feelings” about emotionally laden topics invariably contradict “facts.” For example, one common assertion is that students of color get more scholarships that white students. Research indicates that is not the case (https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=134623124). Where does this perception then come from?  How is it propagated?  What are the ramifications?

Difficult issues like this will be a common thread in the daily discourse of this class. Students will be expected to listen respectfully, honor diverse beliefs/opinions by allowing them full voice in the classroom discussions, and support their own assertions with facts that emerge from research. While discussions may become impassioned and earnest, disrespectful behavior and language, interruptions, and rudeness will not be permitted or condoned. Civil discourse is the rule of the day.

 

HP 3152: Outbreaks and Pandemics, ONLINE
Instructor: Joslyn Cassady
Honors College Attributes: Honors Non-Western, Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes:
PN (Physical and Natural World)
A&S attributes: none
Join me in the timely interdisciplinary study of infectious disease outbreaks and pandemics. This course provides students with an introduction to domestic and international disease outbreaks, methodologies for public health investigation and response, and programs for pandemic preparedness. We will study the disease ecology and societal response to outbreaks such as Covid-19, Ebola, “Mad Cow” disease, and HIV/AIDS. The instructor was an Epidemic Intelligence Officer (a.k.a. “disease detective”) with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and will prioritize learning from case studies of real-world outbreak investigations.  In the end, students will gain an understanding of the staggering health challenges posed by human-animal interactions, social inequality, and environmental contamination, as well as the intervention strategies that have been developed to confront them.

 

HP 3152: History of U.S. Military Theory and Operations
Instructor: Geordie Beal
Honors College Attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
This course will explore the history of military thought and how it was applied to strategic and operational practice in the United States from the colonial period to the present.  While many general history courses cover specific wars from the political level, this course will focus at the military strategic and operational levels of war.  Basically put, the course will consider how the military executed the government's strategic guidance.  It will provide us a means to appreciate, consider, and debate how well the military served the nation.  This course will introduce students to a variety of the most important doctrines and theories in U.S. military history; from combined arms operations, through the American interpretation of Napoleonic practices, Sherman’s “hard hand of war,” to development of operational design and multi-domain operations.  At the conclusion of the course, students will understand how the American way of war has evolved and be able to articulate in a scholarly manner how the military applied doctrine in the support of the nation’s goals.  Grades will be based on submitted research papers (using primary and secondary sources), individual and group presentations (battle studies), class participation and short online quizzes.  Initial coordination has been done to conduct one of the battle studies at Ft. Laramie (or another site) – tentatively scheduled for Oct. 15th.  If the battlefield visit is not possible, the class will conduct a virtual battlefield visit.


HP 3152: Hunting 
Instructor: Ann Stebner Steele 
Honors College Attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none

Hunting plays a prominent role in the culture and traditions of many people in the American West and across the globe. However, nationally the number of hunters has declined in recent years, and many people believe hunting is unethical. How can we explain these two realities? What makes hunting such a powerful and defining tradition for some while others find it alien or even appalling? Is hunting a viable means for procuring food? Does it offer value, economically or culturally, to our communities? How does the practice of hunting play into questions of sustainability, conservation, and land use?  Together in this class, we will create an open, supportive community that allows us to explore these questions through lenses of personal experiences and various academic disciplines (e.g., philosophy, economics, ecology, rangeland management, anthropology, and narrative writing and storytelling). For a bit more exploration on what this course will tackle check out Professor Stebner-Steele's blogpost titled "Why I hunt."

 

HP 3153: Picturing Mental Illness in Art, Film and Literature
Instructor: Breezy Taggart
Honors College Attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes:
none
A&S attributes: none

This course will provide a multidisciplinary introduction to the impact of mental health and illness on the human experience and its representation in art, film, and literature. Drawing on social theory, humanities perspectives, and visual formal analysis we will explore various themes, including: representations of healthy/unhealthy bodies and minds, depictions of mental health and its treatment, and constructions of healing and care or lack thereof.  Through the lens of art, literature, and film we will examine the evolving roles of those who have treated and cared for the mentally ill and examine how humans have explored mental health. A general goal of the class is to understand and reconstruct societal views on mental illness/health.  Classes involve a mix of discussions based on course materials, films, literature, and cultural artifacts, in-class activities and presentations, and writing assignments and is organized into thematic units. 

 

HP 3153 - Art and Culture of Hip-Hop, ONLINE
Instructor: Adrian Molina, JD
Honors College Attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes:
(H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: (D) Diversity
This course is an inter- and multi-disciplinary course inspired by human culture.  This course explores a culture and form of music that hundreds of millions of people throughout the world identify with.  Hip-Hop was born in the South Bronx, NY in the early 1970s, where African-American, Latino, and immigrant populations were essentially cast off as a result of the construction of the Cross Bronx Expressway, white flight into the suburbs, and the politics of abandonment.  Hip-Hop music and culture has now spread throughout the world, and regardless of whether the discussion is about mainstream gangster rap or socially and political conscious Hip-Hop, this emerging field of study has broad, cultural, social, political, and economic implications.  Students will research, explore, discuss and write about American historical music influences, the history and development of hip-hop, the various artistic elements of hip-hop, hip-hop as a culture,  hip-hop journalism, and hip-hop’s influence on American society.  Using hip-hop as an academic tool, students will also explore the following issues: race relations, racism, sexism and misogyny, class struggle, urbanization, pan-ethnicity and ethnic/cultural diasporas, civil rights era activism, post-civil rights Black and Latina/o community leadership, activism through art, globalization, the commodification of art and culture in corporate America, the perpetuation of racism and sexism through mass media, alternative forms of cultural media, the poetics of hip-hop, and communication through musical form.  

 

HP 4151: Futurism 001, ONLINE
Instructor: Adrian Molina, JD
Honors College attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: none
This course is about the present human condition, human diversity, and the future of humanity.  

Is there any question that we are living in the future?  Is there any doubt we are in times of accelerated change and shifting landscapes?  Whose future is it?  Whose imagination are we living in?  It is a time of mass movements for racial and economic justice, new gender orientations, populism and fascism, anti-fascism and mass protests.  Mixed reality.  Wearable technology.  Virtual headsets.  Artificial intelligence.  Robots.  Cyborgs.  Self driving vehicles and flying cars.  Singularity.  Questions of human survival.  Time travel.  Quantum leaps…  

Futurism 101 places students in the context of present and future times.  Most college classes and the bulk of academia revolves around the distant past or recent history, with select courses focusing on current events.  While it is critical to study history from a multitude of perspectives, young people know intuitively that we are in different times. The social rules, norms, modes, moods, pace, and dialogue have shifted dramatically over the past decade.  Popular media, social media, and social and political movements indicate that further shifts will come in rapid succession.  Students now need to study the future as much as they study the past.  Given the multitude of present and future problems facing the human species, we have never been more in need of imagination, expansions of consciousness, and forward thinking.  

Futurism 001 exposes students to various futurist movements of the past 100 years, with a focus on contemporary perspectives of Women of Color, and the futurist movements of people of color.  Course topics include: futuristic depictions in popular media and alternative media; philosophies of time and space; future cultural, social and political identities; human agency to determine future life on planet earth; and emerging strategies for social change.  

 

HP 4152: Ideation, Innovation, and Invention
Instructor: Chris Rothfuss
Honors College attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
From Fortune 50 corporations to garage start-ups, open innovation has become a standard practice for overcoming challenges, developing solutions and bringing new products to market.  In this course we will learn and apply various innovation techniques to develop and refine REAL potential solutions to REAL targeted challenges. With sufficient skill, determination and some luck, these solutions may result in products, start-ups, or intellectual property.  This course will be primarily experiential and student interest driven as we work to implement concepts and best practices for innovation. We will research, we will brainstorm, we will prototype, we will refine, and we will repeat. We will benefit from a broad range of backgrounds and interests - all majors are welcome!

 

HP 4152: Religion, Unbelief and the Human Condition 
Instructor: Tyler Fall
Honors College Attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes:
None
A&S attributes: None
This course ranges across academic disciplines and examines and questions some of the dominant ideas western civilization has produced about religion, skepticism, unbelief, morality, society, and the ideal human life. We will read authors from antiquity to the present. They have divergent perspectives: some are militant atheists; others are deeply religious. Some are optimistic about human potential and progress; others are starkly pessimistic. The course readings are drawn from a variety of literary genres -- philosophical treatises, poetry, memoirs, drama, and fiction -- but they all circle back to one fundamental question: what should we humans do?"

 

HP 4152: Business Application of Blockchain and Fintech 
Instructor: Steven Lupien 
Honors College Attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
Blockchain is regarded as a technology as revolutionary as the Internet. This honors-level course provides an understanding of the coming implications and opportunities associated with this technology and its many use cases. Through industry experts, discussion and group projects, this course will analyze how blockchain technology and digital assets are disrupting and changing global finance, banking, and international trade, including ways we think about money and traditional financial institutions.

The course also aims to uncover opportunities for blockchain to bring value to society, shrink the settlement time of financial contracts and transform the landscape of legal contracts. Students will leave the course prepared to understand coming changes to the global economy, including the disintermediation of markets, adoption of digital assets and democratization of capital.

HP 4976: Independent Study
DOES NOT COUNT TOWARDS HONORS-COLLEGE UPPER-DIVISION ELECTIVES
Instructor: Student must identify faculty mentor and receive approval from faculty mentor and the Honors College
Honors College Attributes: none
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
Why might you take an Honors independent study?  Register for one if you need the structure to help you complete your senior capstone project, if you need additional upper division elective hours to graduate, if you need additional hours to be a fulltime student in any given semester, or if you have been working with an instructor on a particularly interesting area for which there is no designated course. You can take up to 3 credit hours of an Honors independent study per semester for up to a total of 6 hours overall. 
You don’t need to sign up for an independent study to complete the senior capstone project.  Please note that these hours do not meet any specific requirements towards your degree or your Honors minorThey do not count towards the required Honors upper division electives.


 Looking for 2020 Summer offerings? Summer 2020 Honors Courses

Contact Us

The Honors College

Guthrie House

1200 Ivinson St.

Laramie, WY 82070

Phone: 307-766-4110

Fax: 307-766-4298

Email: honors@uwyo.edu

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