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Global & Area Studies|College of Arts and Sciences

Past Events

Spring 2014

World to Wyoming Series with Mark Jenkins - First of the Last Skiers

Deep in the Altai Mountains of Central Asia there is a ski culture that has survived unchanged for at least five thousand years. Wide, long, curve-tipped skis are hewn by axe from red spruce and the bases nailed with silky horsehair. The Kazakh and Tuvan tribesmen of the region use the skis to hunt elk. Guns are illegal, so they lasso the beasts from their skis---a primordial tableau that is depicted in local petroglyphs dating from 8000 BC.  National Geographic writer and UW writer-in-residence Mark Jenkins lived and hunted with these extraordinary skiers in winter 2013. 

 

Reflections on a Diplomatic Career - Students & Public Roundtables with Ambassador Marc Wall

Ambassador Marc Wall is the 2013-14 Senior Visiting Scholar in Global Studies at the University of Wyoming.  Most recently the Foreign Policy Advisor to the United States Pacific Command in Hawaii until summer 2013, he has served as U.S. Ambassador to Chad, coordinated reconstruction programs in Iraq, managed trade initiatives with Japan, China, and Taiwan, and served in economic and commercial positions in Zimbabwe and Côte d'Ivoire.  In Washington, D.C., he has been a member of the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff and held various positions shaping U.S. policy towards Asia, Africa, and international economic organizations including as Director of the Economic Policy Staff in the Africa Bureau and as Senior Advisor to the China Economic and Security Commission.  An accomplished diplomat and policy professional, he has also taught at Georgetown University, the National Defense University, the City College of New York, and George Washington University’s Program for International Studies in Asia.  He has a B.A. in European History from Princeton and a Masters in International Affairs from Columbia University.

 

Iran, Syria and the Challenges of Middle East Strategy with Richard Fontaine

The United States has turned from force to diplomacy in its dealings with Iran and Syria.  In so doing, it has refashioned its strategy in the Middle East and attempted to balance its interests in a region that is undergoing rapid transformation.  Richard Fontaine, President of the Center for a New American Security and former Associate Director for Near Eastern Affairs on the National Security Council staff, will address the changes taking place across the Middle East and the challenges these pose for U.S. strategy. He served as a Senior Advisor and Senior Fellow at CNAS from 2009-2012 and previously as foreign policy advisor to Senator John McCain for more than five years.  He has also worked at the State Department, the National Security Council and on the staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

To watch this event online please click HERE

 

Wyoming Goes Global: Building UW's Strategy for the Next Century of International Research, Partnerships and Education - Conference Launching the Center for Global Studies

The purpose of the Center for Global Studies (CGS) is to advance the University of Wyoming to the next level of excellence in internationally-focused scholarship, research, and enhanced student education.  It will be UW’s home for interdisciplinary research with a mission to foster global and comparative scholarship and learning for the benefit of students, faculty and the broader Wyoming and national/international community.  The Center seeks to enhance international competencies at home which are necessary to engage students and faculty in a changing, challenging, and interdependent global society.  The Center will formally launch on March 31, 2014 with a day-long conference on Wyoming and the World: Bridging Divides in International Scholarship featuring interdisciplinary panels highlighting faculty and graduate student international research from across campus, a roundtable discussion on global career options featuring alum and international studies professionals, and a public keynote and keynote dinner.  The purpose of this conference is to illustrate how the Center will serve as a collaboration fulcrum for faculty/students from various colleges and departments to foster cross-disciplinary research in international political, socio-economic, historical, cultural, scientific, environmental, and energy issues. The Center’s activities are meant to compliment and work in conjunction with other international offices on campus to build leadership, excellence, and depth in international research and creative activities. The Center will be a home for internationally-focused, multidisciplinary collaborative research groups that involve faculty and students. 

Fall 2013

Popular Culture in East Asia: The Production and Consumption of Inter-Asian Love Dramas

This talk uses inter-Asian television love dramas to illustrate "East Asian pop culture" as a sphere of production, circulation, and consumption. It unpacks the tensions between the local and the regional, with women caught in this process as consumers, workers, and citizens. If production for regional audiences aims to transcend the local, what are the strategies the TV industries use to reach regional audiences? What are the textual politics that are negotiated in order to reach regional female audiences? What are the tensions between the regional and the local?  Practices of consumption are always embedded in local dynamics, what are the local politics that enable women to interpret these inter-Asian TV love dramas? What functions do these interpretations perform in the larger social and political domains?

 

Understanding the China-U.S. Challenge:  Globalization, Economic Development, and a Future of Shared Dependence

Many call the 21st Century, China’s century and its political, economic, and social trends have ripple effects around the globe.  This discussion brings together an international interdisciplinary panel of experts from Shanghai University and the University of Wyoming to address topics such as China’s weathering of the global economic crisis, Chinese modernity and cultural change, Chinese civil society and its development, and China’s world view and relationship with its neighbors, among other topics.  This discussion will help us to understand the opportunities and challenges that China presents for the United States and the globe now and into the future. 

Dr. Yarong Ashley, Global and Area Studies (UW)

Dr. Mingming Cheng, School of Sociology, Shanghai University

Dr. Zhengwei Xia, Department of History, Shanghai University

Prof. Junfeng Pan, Department of English, No 3 Military Medical University

  

Global Studies Excellence Initiative Event
Reflections on a Diplomatic Career – Student Roundtable with former Ambassador Marc Wall

- Understanding the Diplomatic Approach to Foreign Affairs

- Reflections on a Diplomatic Career – Asia to Africa

- Global Challenges and the Future of Diplomacy

Most recently the foreign policy advisor to the United States Pacific Command in Hawaii until summer 2013, he has served as U.S. Ambassador to Chad, coordinated reconstruction programs in Iraq, managed trade initiatives with Japan, China, and Taiwan, and served in economic and commercial positions in Zimbabwe and the Ivory Coast.  In Washington, D.C., he has been a member of the Secretary of State’s Policy Planning Staff and held various positions shaping U.S. policy towards Asia, Africa, and international economic organizations including as Director of the Economic Policy Staff in the Africa Bureau and as Senior Advisor to the China Economic and Security Commission.  An accomplished diplomat and policy professional, he has also taught at Georgetown University, the National Defense University, the City College of New York, and George Washington University’s Program for International Studies in Asia.

 

Climbing Everest:  The Myths, Magic, and the Macabre with Mark Jenkins

Mark Jenkins, an international alpinist, is a critically acclaimed author, a field staff writer for National Geographic and a writer-in-residence at the University of Wyoming.  Jenkins climbed Everest in the spring of 2012 and explains Everest’s past and present and how the meaning fo climbing the mountain has evolved.

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