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Division of Kinesiology & Health|College of Health Sciences

Program Learning Outcomes

GOALS AND OUTCOMES FOR UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

GOALS AND OUTCOMES FOR GRADUATE EDUCATION



GOALS AND OUTCOMES FOR UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

      The Division of Kinesiology and Health offers two undergraduate programs leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology and Health: Kinesiology and Health Promotion (K&HP); and Physical Education Teacher Education (PHET).  Both are four-year 120 credit hour degree programs.  Approximately 450 majors are enrolled across the two undergraduate programs.

 

A.  COMMON CORE IN KINESIOLOGY AND HEALTH

      Kinesiology and Health majors in the two undergraduate programs complete a common core of five lower division courses from the Division of Kinesiology and Health (HLED, KIN, and PEAC courses).  The Common Core is designed to provide majors a basic understanding of kinesiology and health.

GOALS

1.   Critical Thinking

      Students will develop critical-thinking skills necessary to understand, analyze, and produce knowledge specific to kinesiology and health.

      Outcomes - The student will:

      •     Critically evaluate forms of information related to kinesiology, health, and/or physical education.

      •     Develop research questions related to issues in kinesiology, health, and/or physical education.

2.   Information Literacy

      Students will develop information literacy skills and abilities essential for adult learning.

      Outcomes - The Student will:

      •     Access information using a variety of information literacy skills.

      •     Complete the library information tutorial exam (TIP) with a minimum score of 70.

3.   Disciplinary Knowledge

      Students will develop knowledge of the organic, skeletal, and neuromuscular structures of the human body, and psychological factors associated with diverse physical activities.

      Outcomes - The Student will:

      •     Understand how the organic, skeletal, and neuromuscular structures of the human body adapt and contribute to motor performance, fitness, and wellness.

      •     Define and contrast physical fitness, physical activity, exercise, and health.

 

B.  KINESIOLOGY AND HEALTH PROMOTION PROGRAM (K&HP)

      The Kinesiology and Health Promotion (K&HP) program is designed to prepare students to assume leadership roles in health, fitness, and wellness related industries, as well as to continue their studies in the health-related fields and graduate level in kinesiology and health.  The K&HP program goals and outcomes are framed around the competencies and skills espoused by the American College of Sports Medicine Health and Fitness Instructor certification and the National Health Standards.  Approximately 350 students are enrolled in the K&HP program.  Students must make application to enter the last two years of the K&HP program (referred to as the professional program).  The admission process is competitive and limited to 65 students per year, 45 in the fall and 20 in the spring.  Following are the courses students complete during the professional program:

GOALS

1.   Knowledge for Application

      A kinesiology and health promotion major will develop knowledge necessary to understand and apply principles, skills, and methods related to biomechanics, exercise physiology, health promotion, and exercise and sport psychology.

      Outcomes - The kinesiology and health promotion major will:

      •     Identify biomechanical, health, physiological, and psychological limitations to and interventions for improving physical performance.

      •     Identify and explain the mechanisms underlying biomechanical, physiological, and psychological changes that occur during after acute and chronic exercise.

      •     Develop physical conditioning programs based on scientific principles designed to develop physical fitness and improve athletic performance.

      •     Understand how mechanical principles can be applied to the analysis of human movement to assess and improve performance and reduce risk of injury.

2.   Clinical and Epidemiological Evidence

      A kinesiology and health promotion major will develop knowledge necessary to understand the clinical and epidemiological evidence linking physical activity and exercise to mental and physical health and approaches to the delivery physical activity and health programs in clinical and community settings.

      Outcomes - The kinesiology and health promotion major will:

      •     Identify and describe psychological, biological, biomechanical, and behavioral factors that can influence health-related adaptations to exercise.

      •     Ability to identify and explain the disease-specific benefits and risks of physical fitness and physical activity for coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis, obesity, cancer, and immune system, anxiety and depression.

      •     Ability to develop an individualized exercise prescription based on scientific principles and appropriate evaluation techniques designed to reduce the risk of chronic disease and avoid injuries.

      •     Ability to identify risks of and safe approaches to exercise and physical activity.

      •     Ability to identify the major personal, environmental, and activity characteristics that determine the adoption and maintenance of participation in supervised and population-based physical activity and exercise programs.

3.   Scientific Method and Critical Thinking

      A kinesiology and health promotion major will understand the scientific method and its application together with critical thinking and analytical skills to solve problems related to physical activity and health.

      Outcomes - The kinesiology and health promotion major will:

      •     Describe and understand the process by which physiological, psychological, biomechanical, and physical- and health-related tests are validated.

      •     Ability to apply scientific principles to evaluate the effectiveness of physical activity and conditioning programs designed to improve health-related fitness or sport performance.

      •     Ability to evaluate the effectiveness of human movement using mechanical principles.

      •     Ability to distinguish between correlational and causal relationships.

 

C.  PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM (PHET)

            The Physical Education Teacher Education (PHET) program is designed to prepare students to teach physical education in schools K-12 as well as to continue their studies at the graduate level in kinesiology and health.  This program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Professional Teaching Standards Board (PTBS), Wyoming Department of Education.  The Physical Education Teacher Education program has received National Recognition through the next NCATE/NASPE accreditation review which will be in 2016.  The PHET program goals and outcomes are framed around the national standards for beginning physical education teachers.  Approximately 100 students are enrolled in the PHET program.  Students must make application to enter the last two years of the PHET program (referred to as the professional program).  The admission process is competitive and limited to 20 students per year.  Following are the courses students complete during the professional program:

GOALS

1.   Content Knowledge

      A physical education teacher education major understands physical education content and disciplinary concepts related to the development of a physically educated person.

      Outcomes - The teacher candidate will:

      •     Identify critical elements of motor skill performance and combine motor skills into appropriate sequences for the purpose of improving skill learning.

      •     Demonstrate competent motor skill performance in a variety of physical activities.

      •     Describe performance concepts and strategies related to skillful movement and physical activity (e.g., fitness principles, game tactics, and skill improvement principles).

      •     Describe and apply bioscience concepts (anatomical, physiological, and biomechanical) and psychological concepts to skillful movement, physical activity, and fitness.

      •     Understand and debate current physical activity issues and laws based on historical, philosophical, and sociological perspectives.

      •     Demonstrate knowledge of approved local, state, and national content standards, and local program goals.

2.   Growth and Development

      A physical education teacher education major understands how individuals learn and develop, and provides opportunities that support their physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development.

      Outcomes - The teacher candidate will:

      •     Monitor individual and group performance in order to design safe instruction that meets learner developmental needs in the physical, cognitive, and social/emotional domains.

      •     Identify, select, and implement appropriate learning/practice opportunities based on expected progressions and levels of readiness.

      •     Identify, select, and implement appropriate learning/practice opportunities based on understanding the student, the learning environment, and the task.

3.   Diverse Learners

      A physical education teacher education major understands how individuals differ in their approaches to learning and creates appropriate instruction adapted to these differences.

      Outcomes - The teacher candidate will:

      •     Identify, select, and implement appropriate instruction that is sensitive to students' strengths/weaknesses, multiple needs, learning styles, and/or prior experiences (e.g., cultural, personal, family, community).

      •     Use appropriate strategies, services, and resources to meet diverse learning needs.

4.   Management and Motivation

      A physical education teacher education major uses and understands individual and group motivation and behavior to create safe learning environments that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

      Outcomes - The teacher candidate will:

      •     Use managerial routines that create smoothly functioning learning experiences.

      •     Organize, allocate, and manage resources (e.g., learners, time, space, equipment, activities, and teacher attention) to provide active and equitable learning experiences.

      •     Use a variety of developmentally appropriate practices (e.g., content selection, instructional formats, use of music, appropriate incentives and rewards) to motivate learners to participate in physical activity inside and outside of the school.

      •     Use strategies to help learners demonstrate responsible personal and social behaviors (e.g., mutual respect, support for others, safety, and cooperation) that promote positive relationships and a productive learning environment.

      •     Develop an effective behavior management plan.

5.   Communication

      A physical education teacher education major uses knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to enhance learning and engagement in physical activity settings.

      Outcomes - The teacher candidate will:

      •     Describe and demonstrate effective communication skills (e.g., use of language, clarity, conciseness, pacing, giving and receiving feedback, age appropriate language, and nonverbal communication).

      •     Communicate managerial and instructional information in a variety of ways (e.g., bulletin boards, music, task cards, posters, Internet, and video).

      •     Communicate in ways that demonstrate sensitivity to all learners (e.g., considerate of ethnic, cultural, socio-economic, ability, and gender differences).

      •     Describe and implement strategies to enhance communication among learners in physical activity settings.

6.   Planning and Instruction

      A physical education teacher education major understands the importance of planning developmentally appropriate instructional units to foster the development of a physically educated person.

      Outcomes - The teacher candidate will:

      •     Identify, develop, and implement appropriate program and instructional goals.

      •     Develop short- and long-term plans that are linked to both program and instructional goals and student needs.

      •     Select and implement instructional strategies, based on selected content, learner needs, and safety issues, to facilitate learning in the physical activity setting.

      •     Design and implement learning experiences that are safe, appropriate, relevant, and based on principles of effective instruction.

      •     Apply disciplinary and pedagogical knowledge in developing and implementing learning environments and experiences.

      •     Provide learning experiences that allow students to integrate knowledge and skills from multiple subject areas.

      •     Select and implement appropriate (i.e., comprehensive, accurate, useful, and safe) teaching resources and curriculum materials.

      •     Use effective demonstrations and explanations to link physical activity concepts to appropriate learning experiences.

      •     Develop and use appropriate instructional cues and prompts to facilitate competent motor skill performance.

      •     Develop a repertoire of direct and indirect instructional formats to facilitate student learning (e.g., ask questions, pose scenarios, promote problem solving and critical thinking, and facilitate factual recall).

7.   Student Assessment

      A physical education teacher education major understands and the varied types of assessment and their contribution to overall program continuity and the development of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional domains.

      Outcomes - The teacher candidate will:

      •     Identify key components of various types of assessment, describe their appropriate and inappropriate use, and address issues of validity, reliability, and bias.

      •     Use a variety of appropriate authentic  and traditional assessment  techniques to assess learner understanding and performance, provide feedback, and communicate learner progress (i.e., for both formative and summative purposes).

      •     Involve learners in self- and peer-assessment.

      •     Use and interpret learning and performance data to inform curricular and instructional decisions.

8.   Reflection

      A physical education teacher education major understands the importance of being a reflective practitioner and its contribution to overall professional development and actively seeks opportunities to sustain professional growth.

      Outcomes - The teacher candidate will:

      •     Use a reflective cycle  involving description of teaching, justification of teaching performance, critique of the teaching performance, the setting of teaching goals, and implementation of change.

      •     Use available resources (e.g., colleagues, literature, professional associations) to develop as a reflective professional.

      •     Construct a plan for continued professional growth based on the assessment of personal teaching performance.

9.   Technology

      A physical education teacher education major uses information technology to enhance learning and professional productivity.

      Outcomes - the teacher candidate will:

      •     Demonstrate knowledge of current technologies and their application in physical education.

      •     Design, develop, and implement student-learning activities that integrate information technology.

      •     Use technologies to communicate, network, locate resources, and enhance continuing professional development.

10. Collaboration

      A physical education teacher education major understands the necessity of fostering relationships with colleagues, parents/guardians, and community agencies to support the development of a physically educated person.

      Outcomes - The teacher candidate will:

      •     Identify strategies to become an advocate in the school and community to promote a variety of physical activity opportunities.

      •     Actively participate in the professional physical education community (e.g., local, state, district, and national) and within the broader education field.

      •     Identify and seek community resources to enhance physical activity opportunities.

      •     Establish productive relationships with parents/guardians and school colleagues to support learner growth and well-being.



GOALS AND OUTCOMES FOR GRADUATE EDUCATION

There are four academic knowledge goals that compose the bedrock of graduate education in the Division of Kinesiology and Health.

A.  ACQUIRING KNOWLEDGE OF FIELD

We attempt to teach what is known about the student's field of interest, but always in the context of the larger existing body of knowledge.

      Outcomes

      •     Retention in program is assessed by minimum standards for cumulative GPA (3.0).  If a student's GPA falls below this minimum, he/she is given one semester to raise his/her GPA to the minimum standard.

      •     Academic quality of a student's entire program of study is assessed by way of the "program of study."  The program of study is a listing of courses the student will complete (thesis and non-thesis).  The program of study is approved by the student's advisor and the Graduate Program Director in the Division.

      •     Specific content knowledge for each program (thesis and non-thesis) is assessed by way of satisfactory completion of the courses completed (program of study).

      •     The knowledge appropriate to each course listed on the program of study is assessed by way of graduate faculty evaluation of specific and appropriate examinations, projects, laboratory experiments, term papers, portfolio preparations, or presentations.

      •     The larger context of knowledge is further assessed by way of the Plan A Thesis or Plan B Paper.  For the Plan A Thesis the committee members (three graduate faculty, two from within the Division and one from outside) assess the student's thesis by way of the oral proposal, written thesis, and oral defense.  For the Plan B Paper, the committee members (three graduate faculty, two from within the Division and one from outside) assess the student's paper by way of the oral proposal and written paper.

 

B.  APPLYING KNOWLEDGE

      We attempt to help our students apply their knowledge to appropriate practical settings (for example, in research laboratories, teaching laboratories, schools, work sites, health centers, etc.).

      Outcomes

      •     In the broadest manner, we expect students to be able to translate what they learn to settings inside and outside the academy.  This is assessed by way of experience in a variety of settings (e.g., cardiac-rehabilitation program, faculty research laboratories, course laboratories, kinesiology and/or health internships, school physical education classes, etc.).

      •     One type of common application assessment is by way of course assignments that require students to volunteer to work with or to observe various populations, for example the aging, school children, athletes, the infirmed, or work site employees.

      •     By way of their Thesis study or Plan B Paper it is expected that students will be able to explain the practical application or possible consequences/significance of their research.  This is assessed by way of the student presenting his/her thesis or Plan B Paper in an open meeting with faculty and students.

 

C.   DISCOVERING KNOWLEDGE

      We attempt to introduce our students to the research and scholarship process, including teaching such cognitive skills as theory testing, synthesizing literature, asking significant research questions, designing studies, and analyzing data.

      Outcomes

      •     All graduate students must complete the Division's research methods course (KIN/HLED 5085) and at least one course in advanced statistics to introduce them to the research process.  These courses assess our student's ability to understand and to conduct credible research.

      •     Participating actively in research, whether it is planning and implementing the thesis study or writing the Plan B Paper, is the central experience of our graduate program.  Research proposals are developed by our students.  This takes place under the supervision of each student's graduate faculty advisor and committee members.

      •     A further component of students completing a thesis is formal application and approval for human subjects and animal research.  Success in this step is assessed by approval of the research project by the UW Institutional Review Board housed in the Research Office.

      •     First-hand experience in the attempt to discover new knowledge is created by way of an independent research project (KIN/HLED 5097 or 5587) under the guidance of a graduate faculty member.  This experience is assessed by successful completion of a project report.

 

D.   DISPLAYING IMAGINITIVE KNOWLEDGE

      We attempt to impart to our students the lifelong spirit of learning to learn what is captured through imagining alternative ideas and solutions - the very basis of the search for truth as it is sustained by the community of scholars - that will prepare our graduates to succeed in their professional careers.  As the philosopher Alfred North Whitehead once observed, imagination is contagious.  Whitehead went on to say that imagination cannot be weighed or measured; in graduate education it can only be exhibited by a faculty that is lit up with imagination.  As much as we can, we try to exhibit this learning with imagination so as to infect our own students with the same light.  Any assessment of the impact of such an influence cannot be made until well into our graduate students' careers.  Nonetheless, we believe that when our students leave us they are a carrier of this positive contagion.

      Outcomes

      •     We expect our students (those studying on-campus) to attend graduate student presentations as well as invited guest lecturer presentations that are scheduled within the Division and encourage our students to attend campus-wide presentations to keep abreast of changes in related fields of study.  We believe that early immersion in active research and scholarship sessions can cultivate more imaginative research and scholarship agendas in that student's future.

      •     We encourage our students to participate in local, state, national, or international forums in their areas of interest.  This might take the form of research presentations, poster presentations, serving as reactors, serving on committees, or organizers of meetings.  Graduate faculty members periodically inform their students of opportunities to publicly participate in the research and educational enterprise.

      •     Graduate faculty members encourage their students to participate in the scholarly enterprise by way of informal discussion of ideas, of alternative research protocols, of new theories, of novel collaborations, of new educational research findings.  These discussions can be among the students themselves, between them and their mentors, or with invited guest lecturers.

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