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CRHRE

1000 E University Avenue, Department 3432

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: 307.766.6544

Fax: 307.766.4356

Email: crhre@uwyo.edu

Mental Health Collaboration | University of Wyoming

About the UW Mental Health Collaborative

Action Item 91 in University Plan 3 urged the establishment of a Mental Health Collaborative (MHC) on campus.  This group first convened in the Spring semester of 2011 and, since then, has met regularly during the academic year to address its dual mission of (1) promoting cross-college research and clinical education and (2) facilitating current initiatives in mental health.  Members of the Collaborative represent a wide range of units and programs, including the Colleges of Health Sciences, Arts and Sciences, Education, and Agriculture and Natural Resources; Department of Human Resources; Office of the Dean of Students; Office of Academic Affairs, and the University Counseling Center.

Upcoming Events

Text, Talk, Act to Improve Mental Health is an hour-long event that uses text messaging to get people talking about mental health and encourage them to take action. Through this event, young people can have a conversation with their peers and give voice to an issue that can otherwise be difficult for them to speak about. This event is geared toward young people, but people of all ages can participate and benefit from it. It's simple: At any time on April 24, gather 3-4 of your friends, family, classmates, students, and/or colleagues; Text "start" to 89800; and Receive polling and discussion questions via text messaging while having a face-to-face dialogue with your group. ​To learn more and to register, go to http://www.creatingcommunitysolutions.org/texttalkact.

May is Mental Health Month!  Information and a toolkit for observing Mental Health Month are available from Mental Health America's web site.

News (courtesy of Mental Health America)

Study—Just One Season of High School Football Can Affect Brain: Even among high school football players who've never had a concussion, a small study suggests that changes can still occur to their brains within the course of a single season. The study involved 45 members of a 2012 varsity team. Players underwent two brain scans—one before and one after the season—with a special type of MRI. Throughout the season, each player wore a helmet fitted with a device that can then be used to figure out what forces have been applied to the head. Although none of the players suffered a concussion, the more total hits a player received to the head, the more changes that were measured in the white matter of the brain. The study doesn't show whether the brain changes are temporary or permanent, or how they might affect players' lives. (HealthDay News, 4/8/14)

Civilians in War Zones Also Suffer Mental Health Problems—Study: Mental health problems are common among civilians who work for the U.S. military in war zones, according to a new study. Among the war zone-based civilian workers in the study, one-third said they felt their lives were threatened a few times a month, through events such as rocket or mortar attacks on military bases and the threat of improvised explosive devices. Workers who experienced a higher number of life-threatening events had more frequent symptoms of mental health problems such as anxiety, depression and anger, according to the study published in the journal Social Psychology Quarterly. The study also found that civilian workers' mental health became progressively worse as they faced an increasing number of threats. (HealthDay News, 4/10/14)

Quality Early Childhood Programs Help Prevent Chronic Diseases In Later Life: Early, intensive education aimed at preparing at-risk children for school may also translate into better health in middle age, researchers report. The findings come from the latest examination of the long-running Carolina Abecedarian Project, one of the first tests of early childhood education. Beginning in the 1970s, researchers enrolled 111 children from low-income, black families in North in a special day care program. Half of the children received nearly constant attention from trained caregivers for 6 to 8 hours per day, 5 days per week. In addition to carefully supervised nutrition and medical care, the children were constantly picked up, played with, and talked to. Researchers have continued to check on the kids as they've aged, and the early attention appears to have paid off. Kids who received the special day care scored better on tests of intelligence than their peers who didn't get the intensive attention. They also had better reading and math scores throughout their schools years, and were more likely to go to college and to hold skilled jobs. And those who had participated in the early education classes were less likely to be teen parents and less likely to have been involved in criminal activity. They were also less likely to smoke cigarettes or to report using marijuana, the investigators found. (The New York Times, 3/27/14)


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CRHRE

1000 E University Avenue, Department 3432

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: 307.766.6544

Fax: 307.766.4356

Email: crhre@uwyo.edu

1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071
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