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Department of Molecular Biology|College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Departmental Seminars

The Molecular Biology Department’s seminar program is one of the very best on campus. We make a strong effort to bring in visiting scientists who can provide a entertaining, enlightening, and current research report on an important area of molecular biology. Shown below is a listing of the current semester’s seminar speakers. Note that departmental seminars during Spring 2011 semester will start at 2:10 pm. in room 103 of the Animal Science/Molecular Biology building.

Molecular Biology Spring 2011 SEMINARS

Date

Speaker & Affiliation

Seminar Title

Host

Jan. 14 Dietlind Gerloff
UC Santa Cruz
Protein-Protein Interaction Bioinformatics from a (Predominantly) Structural Perspective Liberles
Jan. 21 Vladimir Uversky   J. Liberless
Jan. 28 Michael Eisen
University of California, Berkeley
Login and Illusion in the evolution of gene regulation in Drosophila Kamneva (grad student)
Feb. 4 Grégoire Altan-Bonnet Modeling how a cytokine tug-of-war arbitrates between response and tolerance in the immune system Jarvis
Feb. 11 Cem Elbi
Merck Research Laboratories
Molecular targeted therapies in cancer: Therapeutic focus and personalized approach David Perry (postdoc)
Feb. 18 Costa Georgopoulos University of Utah

Function of a universally-conserved protein folding machine and its regulation by bacteriophages

Wall
Feb. 25 David Sherwood
Dept. Biology Duke University
Breaching the basement membrane: Anchor cell invasion in C. elegans Fay
Mar. 4 Caroline Harwood
University of Washington d>
  Gomelsky (Tuzun Guvener, Sr. Res. Scientist)
Mar. 11 Mark Zabel
CSU
Prion Immunology, Diagnostics and Therapeutics Schatzl
Spring Break
 
Mar. 25 Bill Bement
University of Wisconsin
Our lab has a long-standing interest in the means by which the cytoskeleton controls cell division, wound healing, and endocytosis. We have developed several model systems that help simplify analysis of complex, cytoskeleton-dependent processes; these are described in our recent publications.” Gatlin
Apr. 1 Egbert Hoiczyk
John Hopkins
Molecular Machines of Myxobacteria Wall
Apr. 8 Pamela Stanley
Department of Cell Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Identifying specific roles for glycans in development Jarvis
Apr. 15 Marni Halpren
Carnegie Institute/Johns Hopkins
  Fay
Easter Break      
Apr. 29 Robert Wayne
University of California, LA
Evolutionary genomics of wolf-like canids Konrad (grad student)

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