Spring 2005 Classes 

PHIL 1000

Introduction to Philosophy - C1/CH

  

MW

11:00-11:50

Professor Goodin

 

Introduces critical thinking through a study of elementary logic and standard philosophical problems of ethics, religion, epistemology, and metaphysics.

Class meets on Mondays and Wednesdays.  Mandatory discussion sections on Friday.

 

MWF

1:10-2:00

John Bengson

 

Introduces critical thinking through a study of elementary logic and standard philosophical problems of ethics, religion, epistemology, and metaphysics.

 

MW

10:00 - 10:50

Professor Griesmaier

 

Introduces critical thinking through a study of elementary logic and standard philosophical problems of ethics, religion, epistemology, and metaphysics.

Class meets on Mondays and Wednesdays.  Mandatory discussion sections on Friday.

PHIL 2310

Philosophy of Religion - C1/CH

 

Tuesday/Thursday

9:35-10:50

John Bengson

 

Who or what is God?  Does God exist?  Are mystical experiences authentic?  Is there an afterlife?  Can religion provide meaning to life?  Can reason determine whether religious claims are justified?  Or, is religion simply a matter of faith?  This course systematically examines these and related issues, investigating both the meaning and justification of diverse religious claims.

PHIL 2330

Environmental Ethics - C1/CH

 

Tuesday/Thursday

1:20-2:35

Professor Goodin

 

Introduces students to ethical theory in environmental problem cases, and to philosophical issues in environmental philosophy.  Topics may include:  conservation/preservation, resource management, pollution, over-population, factory farming, Leopold’s Land Ethic, deep ecology, holism, and eco-feminism.

PHIL 2420

Critical Thinking - C1/CH

 

On-line

On-line

Robin Hill

 

Suppose I try to convince you of the conclusion that the fetus is a person with the following reasons: If something is a person, then it has biologically-human DNA; and the fetus has biologically-human DNA.  Should you accept the conclusion on the basis of these reasons given?  The President says “You’re either for us or you’re against us.”  Suppose you’re not in favor of the war.  Does it really follow that you’re anti-American?  This class will teach the principles of good and bad reasoning and apply them to lots of currently-circulating arguments.

PHIL 3000

Introduction to Metaphysics and Epistemology - C1-W2

 

MWF

11:00 - 11:50

Professor Moffett

 

An advanced course for undergraduates exploring traditional and contemporary issues in epistemology and metaphysics.  Topics may include:  knowledge and belief, skepticism, perception and knowledge, memory, truth, the justification of induction, causality, individuation and the distinction between particulars and universals.

PHIL 3300

Ethical Theory - C1

 

Tuesday/Thursday

11:00-12:15

Professor Sherline

 

This course will consider some of the big questions about ethics from a contemporary perspective:  Are ethical standards relative to culture?  Are moral claims grounded on individual beliefs and feelings?  Why care about other people?  Is morality merely an ideology used by the powerful to keep the rest of us down?  What is the most important point of morality:  Individual virtue, bringing about a better world, or respecting people?

PHIL 3420

Logic II - Symbolic Logic

 

MWF

1:10 - 2:00

Professor Griesmaier

 

Second course in the logic sequence. Studies both propositional and quantificational logic, concentrating on methods of proof. Takes up such topics as identity, singular terms, intuitive set theory, and translating English sentences into symbolic notation.

PHIL 4000-01

Feminism and Pragmatism in the Early Twentieth Century:  Jane Addams and Charlotte Perkins Gillman

 

Tuesday

7:00-9:30

Professor Earls

 

 

PHIL 4000-02

Gender and the Philosophy of Science

 

Monday

3:10-5:40

Professor Goodin

 

Science and the scientific method, long thought one of the most important foundations of western civilization has come under recent attack from a variety of fronts.  This course will examine the meaning of science, the meaning of rationality, study basic feminist theory in order to understand the feminist critiques of these concepts, and then examine the response of science to these critiques.  A major theme of the course will be whether either of the opposing camps understands the other side enough for the critiques to be valid.  A genuine attempt will be made to reach a shared understanding of both sides of the issue.

PHIL 4200

Social and Political Philosophy

 

Tuesday

2:10 - 4:40

Professor Sherline

 

This course will survey a number of topics relevant to philosophy of law (for example, why obey the law, what are the moral limits of the criminal law, what role should the constitution play in limiting majoritarian decisions).  The last few weeks of the course will be devoted to looking at John Rawls’s systematic approach to political philosophy and how it provides a unified approach to a variety of issues.

PHIL 5190

Philosophy of Language

 

Thursday

2:10 - 4:40

Professor Moffett

 

An investigation of such problems as traditional and contemporary theories of meaning; concept formation, inter-translatability of natural languages, generative grammars, and definition.