Philosophy

Course Offerings - Fall 2005

Phil 1000-01

Introduction to Philosophy - C1, CH

Goodin

MWF

1:10 � 2:00

An introduction to critical thinking through a study of elementary logic and scientific method and an introduction to philosophical problems of ethics, religion, epistemology, and metaphysics.

Phil 1000-02

Introduction to Philosophy - C1, CH

Sherline

MWF

11:00 � 11:50

An introduction to critical thinking through a study of elementary logic and scientific method and an introduction to philosophical problems of ethics, religion, epistemology, and metaphysics.

Phil 1000-03

Introduction to Philosophy - C1, CH

Stevens

MWF

10:00 � 10:50

An introduction to critical thinking through a study of elementary logic and scientific method and an introduction to philosophical problems of ethics, religion, epistemology, and metaphysics.

Phil 1030-01

Intellectual Community in Cinema Etc.

Griesmaier

TR

2:45 � 4:00 (Tues night film Screen 7-10:00)

Introduces students to a range of issues within the humanities through the analysis of film, television, and theater. Taught respectively by Modern and Classical Languages, English, and Philosophy.

Phil 2300-01

Ethics: Social Issues � C1, CH

Stevens

MWF

2:10 � 3:00

Examines ethical issues that are particularly relevant to our culture and time period.  Possible topics include abortion, environmental ethics, euthanasia, war and terrorism, capital punishment, the impact of advertising in our culture, our treatment of animals, and same-sex marriage.

Phil 2420-01

Critical Thinking � C1, CH

Stevens

MWF

11:00 � 11:50

First course in the logic sequence. Shows that argument is a skill of fundamental importance to any field of endeavor. Explains methods used in evaluating an argument. Introduces such topics as: patterns of reasoning; counterexamples; fallacies; inductive and deductive logic.

Phil 3000-01

Seminar: Philosophy of Biology

Moffett

TR

1:20 � 2:35

This course will examine some central problems in the philosophy of biology: Why is (or is not) creationism a scientific alternative? What exactly is evolution by natural selection? Is it possible to give a naturalistic account of the "functions" of organs or organisms? What are the units of selection? What is "fitness": is it a tautological concept? What are species? Is the attempt in "sociobiology" and �evolutionary psychology� to extend biological explanations to psychological and social facts about human beings theoretically well-founded?

Phil 3000-02

Seminar: Political Philosophy

Sherline

TR

11:00 � 12:15

In this course we'll be reading a number of the great political philosophers of the western tradition, including Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Hume and Thoreau.We�ll also study at least one major contemporary philosopher on the topic.The theme that will unify these different voices will be the nature and extent of political authority.That is, why should I obey the law, even when I regard the law as immoral or stupid?When, if ever, is civil disobedience justified?A second and related theme will be whether democratic accounts can give adequate answers to these hard questions.

Phil 3100-01

History of Modern Philosophy: Descartes to Kant � C1

Goodin

MWF

11:00 � 11:50

Part two of the history of philosophy sequence. The second great age of philosophy absorbed the influence of the new science during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. People to be studied include: Descartes, Locke, Spinoza, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume and Kant. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy or consent of instructor.

Phil 4140-01

Topics: Confirmation

Griesmaier

W

3:10 � 5:40

When pursuing and developing empirical theories, we want to end up accepting those that are the best in light of the available evidence. This much is uncontroversial. What�s not entirely uncontroversial is what �being the best in light of the available evidence� exactly amounts to. For starters, there is the question as to what counts as evidence for or against a theory. Is it just data-sets? Or should we include other features, such as a theory�s compatibility with other theories, or its explanatory power? Second, what exactly is the relation between theory and evidence? Is it a logical, maybe even deductive, relation? Or is it a probabilistic relation? Third, how should we assign probability to a theory in light of the evidence? Bayesians give one sort of answer, while real scientists may give another answer. And then there is the general question as to how we should understand the notion of probability. These are some of the issues we�ll explore in this seminar.

Phil 4420-01

Logic III, Advanced Logic

Moffett

R

2:45 � 5:30

Studies advanced topics in mathematical logic. Takes up such topics as: uninterpreted calculi and the distinctive contributions of syntax and semantics: metatheory, including completeness and consistency proofs: modal logic and semantics; logic as a philosophical tool.

Phil 5020-01

Plato

Forrester

W

7:00 � 9:30 pm

A detailed look at how Plato�s metaphysics and epistemology developed in such late dialogues as the Theaetetus, Timaeus , Parmenides, and Sophist.Alongwith theseand other dialogues, we�ll be working through the manuscript of a book I�ve written on Plato�s later metaphysics.

 

Major and Minor information can be found on the Philosophy web site at:

http://uwyo.edu/philosophy

or by contacting the Philosophy Department at 766-3204, Hoyt Hall, Rm 325