Philosophy

Course Offerings � Spring 2007

Phil 1000-01

Introduction to Philosophy - C1, CH

Goodin

MW
11:00-11:50

 

With a discussion session on Fridays

An introduction to critical thinking through a study of elementary logic and scientific method and an introduction to philosophical problems of ethics, religion, epistemology, and metaphysics.

Discussion Sections held on Fridays:
section 10 � 11:00-11:50
section 11 � 11:00-11:50
section 12 � 12:00-12:50
section 13 � 10:00-10:50

Phil 1000-02

Introduction to Philosophy C1, CH

Wright

TR

9:35 � 10:50

An introduction to critical thinking through a study of elementary logic and scientific method and an introduction to philosophical problems of ethics, religion, epistemology, and metaphysics.

Phil 1000-03

Introduction to Philosophy - C1, CH

Sherline

MW
10:00-10:50

 

With a discussion session on Fridays

What is the nature and value of philosophy? Is the whole world a dream? What is the relation of my mind to my body?Does God exist?What is the meaning of life?Is morality relative?In this course we'll examine these questions, and you'll learn the basics of critically evaluating answers to them. The readings will be a mixture of classic and contemporary authors weighted towards the classics (Socrates, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume.).

 

Discussion Sections held on Fridays:
section 14 � 10:00-10:50
section 15 � 10:00-10:50
section 16 � 11:00-11:50
section 17 � 9:00 � 9:50

Phil 2100-01

The Greek Mind � C1, CH

Goodin

TR

11:00-12:15

Part one of the history of philosophy sequence. The first great age of Western philosophy was in ancient Greece. Students read from ancient Greek poets, historians and medical writers, as well as philosophers. The course attempts to understand the Greek mind: what Greeks thought of persons, society and the universe.

Phil 2345-01

Natural Resource Ethics � CH, D

Lockwood

TR
11:00-12:15

Introduces students to ethics in context of natural resource extraction, use, conservation, preservation, and distribution.  Ethical frameworks include teleological and deontological theories primarily applied to human needs and wants.  Concepts and applications of environmental justice are addressed, including private property, sustainability, and obligations to future generations.

 

Phil 3000-01

Introduction to Epistemology � C1, W2

Griesmaier

TR

1:20-2:35

In 1963, Ed Gettier formulated two counterexamples to the traditional analysis of knowledge as justified true belief. This lead, on the one hand, to a considerable revival of interest in skepticism, and on the other hand, to a proliferation of theories about what sort of condition has to be added to the traditional analysis of knowledge. In this course, we will study in detail the various reactions to Gettier cases and their implications for issues concerning the role of perception, memory, and reasoning in our quest for knowledge.

Phil 3300-01

Ethical Theory � C1

Wright

MWF

11:00 � 11:50

A philosophical investigation of such concepts as morality, obligation, goodness, freedom and responsibility, and of recurring types of ethical theory.

Phil 3420-01

Symbolic Logic

Griesmaier

TR
9:35-10:50

Studies both propositional and quantificational logic, concentrating on methods of proof. Takes up such topics as identity, singular terms, intuitive set theory, and translating English sentences into symbolic notation.

Phil 5100-01

Figures in Modern & 19th Century Philosophy

Goodin

M
2:40-5:10

Leibniz

Phil 5190-01

Topics: Philosophy Language

Moffett

W

2:40-5:10

We use words to mean things. Do words also have meanings? If so, what sort of things are meanings? Are they objects in our heads or are they independent of us? And how do we come to understand a language to begin with? These are just a few of the foundational questions to be considered in this course.

Phil 5300-01

Topics in Ethics

Sherline

R
3:00-5:30

This course will be a survey of contemporary work on value theory, with special attention to three areas: 1. Perfectionist theories of value (also known as objective theories); 2. Recent work on the meaning of life; 3.Recent empirical work on happiness.

 

 

Major and Minor information can be found on the Philosophy web site at:

http://uwyo.edu/philosophy

or by contacting the Philosophy Department at 766-3204, Hoyt Hall, Rm 325