Religious Studies Program

Philosophy

Course Offerings - Fall 2007

Phil 1000-01

Introduction to Philosophy - C1, CH

Griesmaier

MW
10:00-10:50

 

With a discussion session on Fridays

This course is designed to introduce you to philosophy by focusing on three major areas of philosophical research: epistemology, or the theory of knowledge,metaphysics, or the theory of the ultimate nature of reality, the philosophy of mind, and ethics, the investigation of the moral permissibility and/or obligatoriness of (types of) human action.

 

Discussion Sections held on Fridays:
section 20 � 10:00-10:50
section 21 � 10:00-10:50
section 22 � 11:00-11:50
section 23 � 11:00-11:50

Phil 1000-02

Introduction to Philosophy C1, CH

Staff

MWF
11:00-11:50

This course is designed to introduce you to philosophy by focusing on three major areas of philosophical research: epistemology, or the theory of knowledge,metaphysics, or the theory of the ultimate nature of reality, the philosophy of mind, and ethics, the investigation of the moral permissibility and/or obligatoriness of (types of) human action.

Phil 1200-01

Intellectual Community in Philosophy � I

Moffett

MWF
9:00-9:50

Philosophy is the critical study of the world in its most fundamental aspects and of our place therein. In this course we will explore a number of philosophical issues as they relate to everyday life.

Phil 2310-01

Philosophy of Religion � C1, CH

Goodin

MWF
1:10-2:00

Philosophical questions, arguments, and theories will be discussed within the various topics of religion (i.e., existence and nature of God, character of religious language, etc.)

 

Phil 2420-01

Critical Thinking: Paradoxes/Puzzles � C1, CH

Moffett

TR
9:35-10:50

A paradox is a contradictory, absurd or otherwise unacceptable conclusion derived from apparently true premises by way of a seemingly valid line reasoning. In this course we will explore a number paradoxes with an eye toward coming to a fuller appreciation of exactly what reasoning (critical thinking) is all about.

Phil 3000-01

TP: Global Justice

Sherline

TR
1:20-2:35

This course takes a philosophical approach to problems of global justice and injustice.We will examine topics such as skepticism of global justice (political realism, states as sovereignty), when it is justified to intervene in another state's affairs for the sake of global justice, as well as substantive issues of justice and injustice, such as extreme poverty, famine, massive differences between rich and poor countries, the AIDs pandemic, malaria and other global health issues, global warming, the loss of biodiversity, nuclear proliferation, slavery, the servitude of women, immigration, the exporting of democracy.These are the problems that appear on anyone�s list of the most urgent moral problems facing us today.

Phil 3000-02

TP: Feminist Ethics

Goodin

MWF

2:10-3:00

This course will examine both traditional ethical theory and the feminist claim ofdeficiencies in the traditional theories.We will examine the validity of the claims that there are deficiencies in the theories and evaluate the feminist ethical theories in terms of how well they deal with various ethical issues.

Phil 3100-01

History of Modern Philosophy � C1

Goodin

MWF

11:00�11:50

This course provides a critical study of philosophical figures during the 17th and 18th century: Descartes, Locke, Spinoza, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume and Kant.

Phil 3560-01

Introduction to Metaphysics

Moffett

TR
11:00-12:15

This course explores the most basic questions concerning the fundamental structure of reality. We will consider questions about the basic furniture of the universe (ontology), as well as the way in which these constituents are inter-related (e.g., the nature of causation).

Phil 4140-01

TP: Reductionism

Griesmaier

T
3:10-5:40

Since at least the 19th century, questions about the reducibility of one scientific discipline to another have received a lot of attention. Could biology, e.g., be reduced to chemistry and then to physics? In the 20th century, questions like this became even more central. The idea of a Grand Unified Science was born � the idea that all areas of research can ultimately be reduced to physics as the fundamental science. The main reason was that metaphysically, such a thorough reduction would provide a beautifully unified world view: no entities beyond those postulated by physics would have to be countenanced in our ontology. The mind, for example, could be seen as a particular manifestation of basic physics. This seminar will explore the plausibility of such a program of reductionism: What exactly is it, what are its advantages, and what its drawbacks?

 

Phil 5020-01

Plato

Staff

W

3:10 � 5:40

TBA

 

 

Phil 5300-01

Topics in Ethics:

Sherline

R
3:10-5:40

We'll be working through Derek Parfit's unpublished manuscript Climbing the Mountain, on normative ethics.

 

 

Major and Minor information can be found on the Philosophy web site at: http://uwyo.edu/philosophy

or by contacting the Philosophy Department at 766-3204, Hoyt Hall, Rm 325