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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Department of Geography

Gerald R. Webster, Department Chair
207 Arts and Sciences Building
Phone: (307) 766-3311, FAX: (307) 766-3294
Website: http://www.uwyo.edu/geography/

Professors:

GERALD R. WEBSTER, B.A. University of Colorado - Denver 1975; M.S. Western Washington University 1980; Ph.D. University of Kentucky 1984; Professor of Geography 2007.

Associate Professors

WILLIAM J. GRIBB, B.S. Wayne State University 1973; M.A. University of Colorado 1975; Ph.D. Michigan State University 1982; Associate Professor of Geography 1993, 1988.
STEVEN D. PRAGER, B.S. University of North Carolina-Charlotte 1992; M.A. 1995; Ph.D. Simon Fraser University 2002; Associate Professor of Geography 2010, 2004.
JACQUELINE J. SHINKER, B.S. University of Arizona 1996; M.A. University of Oregon 1999; Ph.D. 2003; Associate Professor of Geography 2011, 2005.

Assistant Professors

YI-LING CHEN, B.S. National Taiwan University 1989; M.S. 1992; Ph.D. Rutgers University 2000; Assistant Professor of Geography 2010.
CARL J. LEGLEITER, B.S. Montana State University 2002; M.A. University of California Santa Barbara 2004; Ph.D. 2008; Assistant Professor of Geography 2009.
MINCKLEY, TOM A., B.S. Northern Arizona University 1987; University of Arizona 1996; M.A. University of Oregon; Ph.D. 2003; Assistant Professor of Geography 2012.

Visiting Assistant Professor

ROBERTA H. WEBSTER, B.A. Lake Superior State University 1978; M.A. University of Kentucky 1982; Ph.D. 1994; Visiting Assistant Professor of Geography 2008.

Research Scientist

JEFFREY D. HAMERLINCK, B.S. University of North Dakota 1988; M.P. University of Wyoming 1992; Ph.D. University of Colorado - Boulder 2011; Director, Wyoming Geographic Information Sciences Center (WyGISC) 2004.

Assistant Research Scientist

SHANNON ALBEKE, B.A. University of Colorado, Boulder 1997; Ph.D. University of Georgia 2010; Assistant Research Scientist 2010.
PADDINGTON HODZA, BSC, University of Zimbabwe, 1994; MSC, University of Zimbabwe, 1998; PhD. West Virginia University, 2007; Assistant Director, Wyoming Geographic Information Sciences Center (WyGISC); Assistant Research Scientist 2013.

Adjunct Faculty

Ramesh Sivanpillai

Professor Emeritus

John L. Allen, William L. Baker, Ronald E. Beiswenger, Deborah D. Paulson, Thomas Buchanan

The department of Geography is comprised of faculty with interests and expertise in geography, planning, and resource management. The department focuses upon the following:

  1. The origin and nature of the physical and cultural environment, how the physical environment and its natural resources form, and how the environment and natural resources affect the quality of life.
  2. The ways in which people and institutions affect natural resources and the environment.
  3. The variety of methods and techniques with which we solve or prevent problems through the planning and management of natural resources.
  4. The ways in which human institutions (e.g. political, economic, social) interact to produce diverse human landscapes.

Four Fundamentals of Geographic Learning

The Department of Geography has identified four fundamental goals of geography to emphasize in its undergraduate curriculum. These four goals are at the intersection of topically important areas in the discipline of geography. We continue to evaluate student learning in our program to insure our curriculum addresses these fundamental goals as effectively as possible.

Goal 1 - Human-Environment Interaction

Students will be able to identify and explain how humans modify the environment and affect Earth's biophysical systems through their human activities.

Goal 2 - Biophysical Systems

Students will be able to identify and explain an array of patterns, processes, and interactions in Earth's biophysical systems occurring at different spatial scales.

Goal 3 - Human-Cultural Systems

Students will be able to identify and explain an array of patterns, processes, and interactions across Earth's human landscapes at different spatial scales.

Goal 4 - Geographic Thought, Methods and Analysis

Students will understand basic geographic concepts and ideas, and will be capable of using them to inform their work. Students will also demonstrate the ability to select and use appropriate tools and techniques for addressing geographic problems and conducting geographic analysis. They will also be able to use multiple methods to examine, represent, and visualize Earth and its geographic characteristics.

Undergraduate Major

In addition to course work required by the university and the college, majors must complete 40 hours of department requirements, all of which must be completed with a grade of C or above. Note: students not pursuing one of the five existing concentrations but who accumulate 15 or more of their 26 content credits in Physical Geography and Geographic Information Science qualify for the B.S. degree. Those accumulating 15 or more of their 26 content credits in Natural Resource Management and Human Geography qualify for either a B.S. or a B.A. degree. Students must declare to their academic adviser their preference of degrees prior to graduation. Students in both the B.A. and B.S. programs must complete the following:

Core Requirements

Hours

GEOG 1000 World Regional Geography

3

GEOG 1010 Intro to Physical Geography

4

GEOG 1020 Intro to Human Geography

3

GEOG 2150 Found of GIS & Tech

4

Total hours

14

Content areas. 26 hours distributed among a minimum of three of the following areas with at least two courses in each of two areas:

  • Human geography
  • Physical geography
  • Geographic information science
  • Natural resource management

Courses which satisfy content area requirements are identified by the following codes which appear at the end of the course descriptions: (H) human geography, (P) physical geography, (A) geographic information science, (R) natural resource management. Courses used to meet department requirements must be approved by the faculty adviser. The remaining credit hours needed for completion of the B.A. or B.S. are elective credits (approximately 13-15).

Undergraduate Concentrations

Although students are encouraged to sample from the wide variety of courses within the geography program, and the general geography major is an option selected by many students, most undergraduate majors choose to specialize in one of the department's areas of concentration.  Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA in concentration area courses.

Concentration in Physical Geography (B.S.). Offerings in this concentration include an introductory survey of the natural environment and advanced course work in areas that include landforms, soils, weather and climate, glacial and periglacial environments, paleoenvironments, and biogeography. Course work in this concentration is frequently related to ongoing faculty research programs and activities. Courses in this concentration are designated with (P) in the following course listing. The concentration consists of 16 hours to include:

GEOG 1010 Intro to Phys Geog

4

and any four of the following courses

 

GEOG 3010 Geomorphology

3

GEOG 3450 Weather/Climate

3

GEOG 3480 Environmental Change

3

GEOG 3550 Natural Hazards & Society

3

GEOG 4000 Terrain Analysis

3

GEOG 4450 Fluvial Geomorphology

3

GEOG 4460 Biogeography

3

GEOG 4470 Fire Ecology

3

Concentration in Geographic Information Science (B.S.). The concentration in geographic analysis focuses upon the interface between geography and the computer. It offers specialized training in a variety of analytic tools and methods courses ranging from the design and preparation of maps using computer-aided mapping programs to the spatial analysis of physical and human phenomena using detailed computer-based geographic-based geographic information systems (GIS).  Courses in this concentration are designated with an (A) in the following course listing. The concentration consists of 19 hours to include:

GEOG 2150 Found of GIS & Tech

4

GEOG 4200 Intro to GIS

4

And at least 12 credits from among the following:
GEOG 4000 Terrain Analysis

3

GEOG 4111 Remote Sensing of Env

4

GEOG 4113 Geol. Remote Sensing

4

GEOG 4150 Cartography & Dig Map Des

4

GEOG 4210 Advanced GIS

4

GEOG 4211 Avd Remote Sensing of Env

4

GEOG 4220 Spatial Modeling/Geocomp

4

GEOG 4240 GISC for Bus. & Ind.

3

GEOG 4280 Quant Methods
4

Concentration in Natural Resource Management (B.A.) Interdisciplinary approach to the management of natural and recreational resources, with emphasis on the Rocky Mountain region. Resource management is a major focus of departmental faculty and encompasses an array of topics, including physical and social aspects of natural resource management, management of fire in natural systems, public land management, hazard studies, the planning-managing-administration of recreation and tourism resources, and the geographic analysis of resource systems. Courses in this concentration are designated as (R) int he course listing. The concentration consists of 15 hours to include: 

GEOG 4040 Conservation of Natural Resources

3

And any four of the following courses:
GEOG 1050 Intro to Env. & Nat. Res.

3

GEOG 2550 Recreation Nat Resources

3

GEOG 3400 Traditional Ecol. Knowledge

3

GEOG 3550 Natural Hazards & Society

3

GEOG 4000 Terrain Analysis

3

GEOG 4051 Env Politics

3

GEOG 4052 Fed Land Politics

3

GEOG 4080 Mgmt. Maj. River Basins

3

GEOG 4111 Remote Sensing of Env

4

GEOG 4211 Adv Remote Sensing of Env

4

GEOG 4310 Found of Sustainable Plan

3

GEOG 4340 Nat Resource Mgt of Western Reservations

3

GEOG 4370 Environmental Planning

3

GEOG 4400 Nat Resource Policy

3

GEOG 4420 Geography & Tourism 3
GEOG 4460 Biogeography

3

GEOG 4470 Fire Ecology

3

GEOG 4750 Public Land Mgmt.

3

Concentration in Human Geography (B.A.). The human geography concentration examines how societies organize their economic, cultural, and political activities spatially, and how human societies interact with their environments. Courses in the concentration are directed toward economic, cultural, regional, and global studies. Students in this concentration typically take a variety of courses from related fields such as sociology, political science, economics, international studies, and American studies. Courses within this concentration are designated with (H) in the course listing. The concentration consists of 15 hours to include: 

GEOG 1000 World Reg Geog

3

GEOG 1020 Intro to Human Geog

3

And any three of the following courses
GEOG 2200 Geography of Wyoming

3

GEOG 2370 Chicano History

3

GEOG 3030 Geog Development

3

GEOG 3050 Econ Geography

3

GEOG 3550 Natural Hazards & Society

3

GEOG 4013 Political Geography

3

GEOG 4050 Interm Econ Geography

3

GEOG 4310 Found of Sustainable Plan

3

GEOG 4325 Legal Aspect of Planning

3

GEOG 4330 Land Use Planning

3

GEOG 4390 Rural/Small Town Planning

3

GEOG 4420 Geography and Tourism

3

GEOG 4500 The American Landscape

3

GEOG 4502 Images of Wyoming & the West

3

GEOG 4540 Cultural Ecology

3

GEOG 4550 Geography of Wine

3

GEOG 4560 Global Cities 3
GEOG 4570 Cultural Geography

3

GEOG 4572 Experience of Place

3

GEOG 4574 Contested Landscapes

3

GEOG 4576 Historical Landscapes

3

Concentration in Planning (B.S.). The concentration in planning offers students a pre-professional curriculum; many students in this concentration go on to complete a graduate degree in the department's graduate planning program. The planning specialty examines the environmental, social and economic factors that influence community and regional change. The program is designed to integrate community visions with current conditions to determine options for the future. The emphasis of the planning concentration is on natural resource and rural community planning, approached from an interdisciplinary perspective. Courses within this concentration are designated with (PL) in the course listing. The concentration consists of 15 hours to include:

GEOG 4310 Found of Sustainable Planning

3

GEOG 4330 Land Use Planning

3

And any three of the following courses
GEOG 4325 Legal Aspects of Planning

3

GEOG 4340 Natural Res. Mgmt on Western Reservations

3

GEOG 4370 Environmental Planning

3

GEOG 4390 Rural/Small Town Plan

3

GEOG 4400 Natural Resource Policy

3

GEOG 4750 Pub Land Mgt

3

Undergraduate Minor

The department offers minors in geography,  planning, and geographic information sciences. Credit requirements range from 18-20 hours of required and elective courses, all of which must be completed with a grade of C or above. Information on the minor programs is available on the geography department website.

Environment and Natural Resources

The department offers a concentration in the university's interdisciplinary program, Environment and Natural Resources. A description of the concentration requirements is available online at the ENR website.

Graduate Study

The Department of Geography offers programs leading to the Master of Arts, Master of Science in Teaching, and Master of Planning Degrees. Areas include: physical geography, natural resource management, spatial analysis, information, and display, and human geography. Areas in planning include: land use planning, natural resource planning, economic development natural resource planning, community and regional planning, and site development.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

In addition to the minimum requirements set forth in this Catalog, applicants must submit a statement of academic and professional goals. All applicants are evaluated on an individual basis. Undergraduate deficiencies, identified by the candidate and adviser, can be remedied during the degree program.

Program Specific Graduate Assistantships

Graduate assistantships are available as both teaching and research assistantships. Applicants for graduate assistantships must submit their completed materials to the graduate coordinator of the department by February 1st prior to the fall semester for which they are seeking the assistantship. Students already in the program as well as new applicants for admission may apply for graduate assistantships. Assistantship duties will be determined following the award and acceptance of the student.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Incoming students must have a minimum undergraduate background equivalent to 15 semester hours in college-level geography courses to include 3 hours each in maps and mapping, human geography, and physical geography. Planning students may use undergraduate course work in planning, analytic tools, regional science, or other relevant subject matter to meet the undergraduate requirement. Deficiency courses prescribed by the faculty adviser do not count toward graduate program requirements, and must be taken for credit and for a grade (not S/U).

All Master Degrees (Plan A Thesis)

Thirty credit hours of approved course work (not including thesis research), a minimum of six hours of thesis research, and completion of a thesis.

Core Requirements - All Programs:

  • GEOG 5000 Research Perspectives (3)
  • Students will successfully complete at least two techniques courses totaling six or more credit hours. These may be selected from the list below. Alternatively, students may discuss with their advisor techniques courses that more appropriately support their program of study and research plans.
    • GEOG 4200 Introduction to Geographic Information Sciences (4)
    • GEOG 5111 Remote Sensing of the Environment/Lab (4)
    • GEOG 5210 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (4)
    • GEOG 5220 Spatial Modeling (4)
    • GEOG 5455 Remote Sensing of Rivers (3)
    • GEOG 5050 Data Management (2)
    • GEOG 5880 Spatial Analysis and Statistics (4)
    • STAT 5070 Statistical Methods for the Social Sciences (3)
    • STAT 5210 Statistical Methods (3)
    • AMST 5800 Historical Preservation (3)
    • SOC 5100 Advanced Social Research Methods (3)
    • GEOL 5430 Applied Geostatistics (3)
    • GEOL 5446 Introduction to Geostatistics (3)

All students must complete a thesis which shall be an original contribution to knowledge.  All students must prepare a thesis proposal for submission to their committee and have committee approval to initiate research on their thesis and must successfully complete an oral defense of their thesis.  The student’s committee may also require a written examination.

Master of Arts in Geography

Students must fulfill all requirements listed above.

Master of Science in Teaching

Students must fulfill all requirements above, plus requirements developed in conjunction with faculty advisor in the College of Education, not to be less than 12 credit hours of courses in education and/or geography education.

Master of Planning

  • Core courses (12 hours)
  • GEOG 4310 Foundations of Sustainable Planning (3)
  • POLS 5510 Public Policy and Program Management (3)
  • GEOG 5325 Legal Aspects of Planning (3)
  • GEOG 5330 Land Use Planning (3)
  • Analysis courses: (three courses - 9 hours)
    • Statistics: (one course - 3 hours)
    • Techniques: (two courses - 6 hours)

Students completing the Plan A option are required to complete a minimum of 6 hours of thesis research.

Students completing the Plan B are required to complete a minimum of 6 hours of geographic research writing and two papers from the areas of  planning: land use, natural resource, or small town and rural area.

Elective Courses - 15 hours of elective course work in planning areas: land use, natural resource, or small town and rural area approved by faculty adviser.

Master of Arts in Geography/Water Resources

Core requirements: 

  • GEOG 5000 Research Perspectives (3)
  • GEOG 5450 Fluvial Geomorphology (3)
  • REWM 4700 Wildland Watershed Management (3)
    OR
  • REWM 4285 Wildland Hydrology (3)

In completing core methods requirements students may also choose GEOG 5111, Remote Sensing of the Environment (4), or GEOG 4455/5455, Remote Sensing of Rivers (3).  Additional course requirements include one class from the Technical Hydrology and/or Water Quality lists for the Interdisciplinary MS Program in Hydrology & Water Resources (WARE) program and one course from the Law and Natural Resource Economics list.

Technical Hydrology Water Quality Course Requirement (at least one of the following):

  • CE 4800 Hydrology (3)
  • CE 5435 Environmental Transport Processes (3)
  • CE 5445 Hazardous Waste Site Remediation (3)
  • CE 5810 Ground Water Hydrology (3)
  • CE 5860 Soil Erosion and Conservation (3)
  • CE 5870 Water Resources Engineering (3)
  • CE 5880 Advanced Hydrology (3) 
  • GEOL 5444 Geohydrology (3)
  • GEOL 5550 Numerical Methods in Ground Water Geology I (3) 
  • GEOL 5570 Advanced Geohydrology (3)
  • REWM 4700 Wildland Watershed Management (3) 
  • REWM 5280 Stream Habitat Management (3)
  • REWM 5285 Wildland Hydrology (3)
  • SOIL/MATH 5110 Modeling Flow Transport in Soil and Groundwater Systems (4)
  • BOT 5740 Ecosystems Analysis (4)
  • CE 4410 Environmental Engineering Chemistry (3)
  • CE 4400 Design of Water Treatment Facilities (3)
  • CE 5410 Advanced Biological Wastewater Treatment (3)
  • CE 5450 Advanced Physical/Chemical Water Treatment Processes (3)
  • GEOL 4490 Geochemistry (3)
  • GEOL 5450 Water Quality Modeling (3)
  • GEOL 5777 Geochemistry of Natural Waters (3)
  • REWM 5710 Watershed Water Quality Management (3)
  • SOIL 5130 Chemistry of the Soil Environment (4)
  • ZOO 4440 Limnology (3)

 

Law and Natural Resource Economics Course Requirement (at least one of the following):

  • AGEC 4710 Natural Resource Law and Policy (3)
  • AGEC 4720 Water Resource Economics (3)
  • AGEC 5630 Advanced Natural Resources Economics (3)
  • ECON 4400 Environmental Economics (3)
  • ECON 4410 Natural Resources Economics (3)
  • ECON 5400 Advanced Resource & Environmental Economics (3)
  • LAW 6660 Environmental Law (3)
  • LAW 6860 Water Rights (3)

 

Plan B (Non-Thesis)

Thirty credit hours of approved course work (not including geographic research writing credit), a minimum of six hours of research writing credit, and the completion of two professional research papers.
 

Core Requirements - All Programs:

  • GEOG 5000 Research Perspectives (3)

Students will successfully complete at least two techniques courses totaling six or more credit hours. These may be selected from the list below. Alternatively, student may discuss with their advisor techniques courses that more appropriately support their program of study and research plans.

  • GEOG 4200 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3)
  • GEOG 5111 Remote Sensing of the Environment/Lab (4)
  • GEOG 5210 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (4)
  • GEOG 5220 Spatial Modeling (4)
  • GEOG 5455 Remote Sensing of Rivers (3)
  • GEOG 5050 Data Management (2)
  • GEOG 5880 Spatial Analysis and Statistics (4)
  • STAT 5070 Statistical Methods for the Social Sciences (3)
  • STAT 5210 Statistical Methods (3)
  • AMST 5800 Historical Preservation (3)
  • SOC 5100 Advanced Social Research Methods (3)
  • GEOL 5430 Applied Geostatistics (3)
  • GEOL 5446 Introduction to Geostatistics (3)

 

All students must have committee approval to initiate research on their professional papers and must successfully complete an oral defense of their professional papers. The student’s committee may also require a written examination.

Geography (GEOG) Courses

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