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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Department of Management and Marketing

Roland Kidwell, Department Chairman
College of Business 354
Phone: (307) 766-3124, FAX: (307) 766-3488
Website: http://www.uwyo.edu/mgtmkt/

Professors:

STACEY K. BAKER, B.S. University of Nebraska-Lincoln 1990; M.B.A. 1992; Ph.D. 1996; Professor of Marketing and Sustainable Business Practices 2014, 2003.
ROLAND E. KIDWELL JR.,
B.S. University of Maryland 1978; M.B.A. Radford University 1987; Ph.D. Louisiana State University 1994; Professor of Management 2011, 2005.
TIMOTHY C. MAZUR, A.B. San Diego State University 1986; M.B.A. The George Washington University 1989; Bill Daniels Distinguished Professor of Business Ethics 2014-16.
RICHARD C. MCGINITY,
A.B. Princeton University 1966; M.B.A. Harvard Business School 1973; D.B.A. 1980; Bill Daniels Chair of Business Ethics 2007; Professor of Management and Marketing 2009; President of the University 2013.
JOHN MITTELSTAEDT, B.A. Saint Olaf College 1986; M.T.S. Harvard University 1989; Ph.D. University of Iowa 1995; Professor of Marketing 2011
C. MARK PETERSON, B.A. University of Virginia 1978; M.S. Georgia Institute of Technology 1989; Ph.D. 1994; Professor of Marketing 2014, 2007.
SANJAY PUTREVU,
M.M.S. Birla Institute of Technology and Science 1997; Ph.D. University at Buffalo, State University of New York 1992; Professor of Marketing 2015.
JOSE A. ROSA,
B.S. General Motors Institute 1977; M.B.A. Dartmouth College 1979; M.A. University of Michigan 1992; Ph.D. 1992; Professor of Marketing and Sustainable Business Practices 2008.
KELLY TIAN, B.S. University of Alabama 1982; M.A. University of Alabama 1985; Ph.D. Georgia State University 1991; Professor of Marketing 2012.
PHILIP E. VARCA, B.A. Florida State University 1971; M.S. Louisiana State University 1975; Ph.D. 1978; Professor of Management 2008, 1989.
LARRY R. WEATHERFORD, B.A. Brigham Young University 1982; M.B.A. University of Virginia 1990; Ph.D. 1991; Professor of Decision Science 2002, 1991.

Associate Professors:

KENT G. DRUMMOND, B.A. Stanford 1980; M.B.A. Northwestern University 1982; Ph.D. The University of Texas, Austin 1990; Associate Professor of Marketing 2002.
GRANT L. LINDSTROM, B.S. Utah State University 1981; M.B.A. University of Utah 1986; Ph.D. 1989; Associate Professor of Management 1996, 1990.
STEPHANIE A. ONETO, B.S. University of Nebraska-Lincoln 1999; M.A. University of Houston 2001; Ph.D. 2007; Associate Professor of Marketing 2014, 2007.
TERRI L. RITTENBURG, B.S. University of Nebraska-Lincoln 1978; M.A. 1980; Ph.D. 1988; Associate Professor of Marketing 1995, 1989.
ROBERT D. SPRAGUE, B.S.B.A. University of Denver 1980; J.D. 1985; M.B.A. University of Southern California 1999; Associate Professor of Legal Studies in Business 2010, 2004.

Assistant Professors:

ANDREW ARNETTE, B.S. Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University 2000; M.B.A. Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University 2002; Ph.D Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University 2010; Assistant Professor of Decision Science 2012.
BARRY L. BREWER,
B.S. United States Air Force Academy 1991; M.S. Air Force Institute of Technology 1995; Ph.D. Arizona State University 2006; Assistant Professor of Decision Science 2011.
JARON HARVEY, B.S. Utah Valley University 2006; Ph.D. University of Oklahoma 2010; Assistant Professor of Management 2012.
STEPHEN JONES, B.S. Oregon State University 2002; M.B.A. Brigham Young University 2010; A.B.D. University of Minnesota 2015; Assistant Professor of Management 2015.
KRISTA B. LEWELLYN, B.S. Syracuse University 1986; M.S. Georgia Institute of Technology 1988; M.B.A. Robert Gordon University 2003; Ph.D. Old Dominion University 2013; Assistant Professor of Management 2014.
ELIZABETH A. MINTON,
B.S. University of Alaska Southeast 2008; M.B.A. Idaho State University 2010; Ph.D. University of Oregon 2014; Assistant Professor of Marketing 2014.

Academic Professionals:

R. CLIFFORD ASAY, B.S. Brigham Young University 1991; M.B.A. Portland State University 1998; Associate Lecturer 2011, 2006.
COREY A. BILLINGTON, B.S. Stanford University 1981; M.S. 1981; Ph.D. 1987; Visiting Professor in Entrepreneurship and Innovation 2015.
TORI KRICKEN, B.S. University of Wyoming 1996; J.D. 2000; Lecturer of Management 2014.

Professors Emeriti

Robert E. Allen, John H. Jackson, Anthony F. McGann, J. Brooks Mitchell, Robert G. Roe, Jack C. Routson, Samuel G. Taylor

Management and Marketing

The Department of Management and marketing offers programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in (1) Management, (2) Marketing, (3) Business Administration (online only starting Fall 2015). The departmental requirements for each of these degree programs are listed below.

All majors in the Department of Management and Marketing must meet requirements of the advanced business prerequisite for enrollment in upper-division courses, must complete the common body of knowledge courses as listed previously and require a minimum grade of C for courses in their major and MGT 4520.

Students outside the business major may take business courses, and are not held to advanced business standing requirements, but they should first check with course instructors to see if they meet other prerequisites. The College of Business Academic Advising Office (COB/AAO) oversees the formal petition process that provides non-majors permission to take business courses, and COB/AAO should be the next step in getting permission after getting consent of the instructor.

Business and accounting 3000- and 4000- level courses are reserved for those with junior or senior level standing whether majors or non-majors unless otherwise noted.

Entrepreneurship Emphasis

The college recommends entrepreneurship as an area of study for business students, and others as well. Entrepreneurship focuses on starting businesses and is useful for all those students who think they might want to own and run their own business some day. It is formally available as a minor.

A minor in entrepreneurship features business courses likely to be important to the creator of a new venture and/or the owner-operator of a growing business or family business. The minor includes exposure to entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship, creation of a new business concept, and formulation of a business plan that can serve as a springboard for a new venture.

Business Administration

Students who elect to major in the business administration curriculum acquire a comprehensive understanding of business as a whole. Through exposure to all functional areas in business, students are afforded the opportunity to develop broad skills and knowledge. The business administration degree prepares students for a wide variety of career opportunities in business and government. Business Admininstration major only available online starting Fall 2015.

In addition to university, college and departmental requirements cited previously, requirements for business administration majors include:

Core Requirements:

  1. Accounting/Finance - ACCT 2110, FIN 4XXX (choice of 4000-level finance course) (6 hours)
  2. Management/Decision Sciences - MGT 3110, 4340, 3410, DSCI 4240 (12 hours)
  3. Marketing - MKT 4430 (3 hours)
  4. Restricted electives - Chosen in consultation with adviser (6 hours)

A complete curriculum sheet is available from the College of Business Academic Advising Office.

Decision Sciences

The decision sciences curriculum is designed to serve students with a variety of majors. A minor in decision sciences is available for students wishing to augment their major with quantitative and computer-based decision-making tools. Decision sciences courses emphasize applications to supply chain operations management.

Decision Sciences (DSCI) Courses

International Business

The internationl business curriculum is designed to serve students with a variety of major. A cross-disciplinary minor in international business is offered to students who want to augment their majors with exposure to global management, finance, economics, accounting and/or a study abroad experience.

A curriculum sheet with the international business minor requirements is available from the College of Business Academic Advising Office.

International Business (INBU) Courses

Management

Successful management requires the effective use of an organization’s resources. Planning, organizing, leading, measuring, and controlling what goes on in the organization are critical management jobs. To do them successfully, managers need understanding/skills in dealing with behavior and leadership at work, changing organizations, supervising others, designing human resource systems, promoting innovation, managing risk and information, negotiating, and decision making.

The curriculum leading to a degree in management is designed to provide the perspectives and tools necessary to help a motivated student move into a career in management.

Students may choose among 3 concentrations (of 12-18 credit hours) in the management major.

Management Consulting

The Management Consulting concentration prepares students to be capable of managing different processes and people, so that they can work in both large and small organizations, or consult with organizations about these issues. A particular emphasis is to help students develop both interpersonal and financial analysis skills so they are capable of resolving a broad spectrum of problems for a variety of different types of organizations. This concentration is designed to provide students with a large degree of flexibility when considering different career paths, because students will be prepared to systematically think through the processes that organizations use to create and maintina sustainable competitive advantage. The concentration prepares students to work in for-profit businesses, non-profit organizations, entrepreneurial ventures, or in government organizations.

Entrepreneurship

The Entrepreneurship concentration is designed to assist students who wish to start their own businesses by providing them with exposure to the development and testing of business concepts, analyzing the potential success of their concepts using a variety of tools and techniques, being flexible in developing new businesses and innovative ideas, and formulating and implementing business plans that will assist in the establishment and growth of new ventures. The concentration also provides students with exposure to issues involving family firms such as governance, succession and interpersonal relationships as well as innovation and change in existing organizations. Thus, the concentration focuses on entrepreneurship in both new ventures and established firms and prepares students to 1) start new businesses, 2) innovate in their own family firms, and/or 3) be entrepreneurial in an existing business.

Supply Chain

The Supply Chain concentration involves the planning, control, and coordination of materials and services from raw materials to customers. Increasing competetiveness through quality, cost, responsiveness, and innovation is essential to supply chain and company success. It is critical to manage processes across boundaries in the firm and across firms that make up the supply chain. Course work will prepare students for managerial positions in the manufacturing and service industries in areas of purchasing, operations, logistics, and customer service.

Management core (12 hours): Ethics 3110 (MGT, MKT, INBU), MGT 3410, 3420, 4470

Management (MGT) Courses

A complete curriculum sheet is available from the College of Business Academic Advising Office.

Marketing

Marketing is a societal process and a set of organizational functions for creating, communicating, and delivering value to customers and for managing relationships in ways to benefit local and global stakeholders. Marketing majors are employed in a wide variety of industries and governmental agencies where understanding and managing customer relationships are critical. Students find jobs in market research, advertising, public relations, professional selling, non-profit marketing, product management, retailing, and brand management.

Marketing courses are designed so that students gain an understanding of how to gather, manage, and use information; how to analyze customers; and how to develop marketing strategy and design a marketing mix. At the same time, students gain skills in ethical decision-making, developing creative solutions to solve problems, communicating effectively, and working in teams. They also learn how to form intelligent judgments and opinions relating to economic, social, and environmental factors which vitally affect every day living for both present and future generations.

Students may choose among 3 concentrations (12 credit hours) in the marketing major.

Sustainability and Global Markets

The Sustainability and Global Markets concentration prepares students to manage marketing activities sustainably within the global context. This concentration assists students in preparing for the challenges of conducting business in a sustainable way, meeting current needs while safeguarding the needs of future generations. Through a global lens, students gain understanding of doing business internationally, considering the cultural, political, legal, economic, technological, and natural environment differences that increase the complexity of marketing functions. Sustainable business practices are innovative strategic and tactical actions that seek to improve balanced economic, environmental, and social outcomes for organizations and stakeholders in both the long and short term. Students are prepared for work in for-profit businesses, non-profit organizations, or in government.

Customer Experience Management

The Customer Experience Management concentration prepares students to manage marketing activites in for-profit businesses, non-profit organizations, or in government. Students will gain a broad skill set in the marketing field. Through careful selection of electives, students can also tailor this concentration to focus in areas such as market research, sales, integrated marketing communication or advertising, public relations, or product management. This versatile concentration will build students’ skills in researching and understanding consumer behavior, indentifying attractive target markets, developing effective marketing strategies, and evaluating an organization’s marketing program.

Supply Chain

The Supply Chain concentration involves the planning, control, and coordination of materials and services from raw materials to customers. Increasing competetiveness through quality, cost, responsiveness, and innovation is essential to supply chain and company success. It is critical to manage processes across boundaries in the firm and across firms that make up the supply chain. Course work will prepare students for managerial positions in the manufacturing and service industries in areas of purchasing, operations, logistics, and customer service.

Marketing core (12 hours)

A complete curriculum sheet is available from the College of Business Academic Advising Office.

Marketing (MKT) Courses

Doctor of Philosophy in Marketing

The Department of Management and Marketing offers a program leading to a Doctor of Philosophy in Marketing, with an emphasis in sustainability.  The program of study draws from extant marketing theory, primarily in consumer behavior, combined with studies in the basic sciences (e.g., anthropology, psychology, sociology) and other applied sciences (e.g., environmental sciences) to create a base of knowledge acceptable for marketing scholarship in higher education, and a depth of knowledge conducive to a stream of publishable research in a specific topic area.  Theoretical development is supplemented with course work in the gathering and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, which prepares the student for rigorous exploration of marketing phenomena related to sustainable business and consumption., Students are required to complete 72 semester hours and a scholarly dissertation that contributes to the knowledge foundations in marketing and contributes to the basic sciences that informed the inquiry.  Semester hours will include core marketing classes, outside elective courses in statistics, basic social sciences, and/or interdisciplinary studies in environmental and natural resources, and dissertation work.  First and second year research projects are also required, aimed at the student having published articles in respected marketing and social science journals before program completion.  Comprehensive exam is completed at the end of the fourth semester. A teaching component is also incorporated into the curriculum. The program is designed to give students a strong research background and intensive teaching experience.

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