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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Art (ART)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

1005. Drawing I. 3. [(none)<>CA] A foundation level drawing course introducing fundamentals of observation, artistic invention, and basic principles of perspective and composition through problems in still life, landscape, and live model. Lectures, drawing sessions, and critiques develop formal, conceptual, and technical understanding of the drawing process.

1110. Foundation: Two Dimensional. 3. First in a sequence of three foundation courses that investigate the fundamentals of design. Basic aesthetic/formal concepts and conceptual approaches are covered through a variety of two-dimensional mediums. Structured critiques are employed to provide students the experience of assessing formal, conceptual, and technical aspects of art. (Normally offered fall semester)

1115. Digital Media. 1. [(none)<>I] An introductory level course designed to investigate the role of digital media in visual literacy. Students gain practice with basic graphics software, explore using the Internet in informing the development of art work, and discuss how application of these skills are used in classroom, studio, and commercial art fields. Prerequisites: none.

1120. Foundation: Three Dimensional. 3. Second in a sequence of three foundation courses that investigate the fundamentals of design. Basic aesthetic/formal concepts and conceptual approaches are covered through a variety of three-dimensional mediums. Structural form is emphasized in various contextual settings. Structured critiques are employed to provide students in the experience of assessing formal, conceptual, and technical aspects of art. Prerequisites: none. (Normally offered spring semester)

1130. Foundation: Color Theory. 3. Third in a sequence of three foundation courses that investigate the fundamentals of design. Explores color theories based on the color wheel/light spectrum including hue, value, chroma, and aesthetic color relationships. Optical color, emotional/psychological color, and color symbolism are also covered. Structured critiques are employed to provide students the experience of assessing formal, conceptual, and technical aspects of art. Prerequisites: none. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

1310. Introduction to Sculpture. 3. [C3<>L] Introduces fundamentals of sculpture as a process of three-dimensional expression. Students explore various media, techniques and concepts through a series of assigned and open projects. Emphasis on traditional methods and formal abstract elements of sculpture are encourages, leading to an understanding of both classic and modern concepts of form. Prerequisites:  ART 1110, 1120.

2000. Portfolio Review. 1. One-semester course in which work is created for a portfolio review at midterm based on the content and principles learned in the foundation core classes. Prerequisites: successful completion of ART 1005, 1110, 1120, and 1130, and department GPA of 2.5.

2002. Special Topics In:. 3 (Max. 6). Permits utilization of unusual faculty expertise and provides highly-specialized and particularly pertinent, timely subject matter. Prerequisite: ART 1005;  ART 1130; sophomore standing.

2005. Drawing II. 3. An intermediate level drawing course building upon fundamentals of observation, artistic invention, perspective and composition through problems in still life, landscape, explorations in wet and dry media, and color with pastels. Lectures, drawing sessions, and critiques develop formal, conceptual, expressive and technical understanding. Prerequisite: ART 1005.

2010. Art History I. 3. [C3<>CA] First semester of a one-year survey. Studies ancient, medieval, renaissance and modern art with special reference to various social, economic and historic factors which motivated and conditioned the aesthetic forms. Includes ancient, medieval and early renaissance periods. ART 2010 and 2020 are required of all art majors and should be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: Successful completion of WA. (Normally offered spring semester)

2020. Art History II. 3. [C3<>CA] Second semester of a one-year survey. Studies European/American Art from the Renaissance through Contemporary with special emphasis and historical factors which motivated and conditioned the aesthetic forms. Covers Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, 18th Century, 19th Century, Early Modernism and Contemporary Art. ART 2010 and 2020 are required of art majors and should be taken in sequence. Prerequisites: Successful completion of WA. (Normally offered spring semester)

2112 [2120]. Graphic Design. 3 (Max. 6). Explores techniques of graphic design preparation from concept through paste-up to the printed page, both on and off the computer. Problems include stationery, brochures, posters and corporate images. Graphic design history is referenced and researched. Prerequisite: ART 1110. (Offered fall semester)

2122 [3110]. Computer Graphics. 3 (Max. 9). Develops hands-on understanding of how visual elements and text are created and manipulated on current graphic design software programs used in the field. Explores techniques of basic graphic design preparation on the computer. Problems are given in various software applications. Uses graphic design problems as technical examples of production. Laboratory/lecture. Prerequisite: ART 2112. (Normally offered spring semester)

2210. Painting I. 3. Introduces problems in painting, developing skill, techniques and concepts. Prerequisite: ART 1005, 1110, and 1130; ART 1120 may be taken concurrently. (Offered fall and spring semesters)

2255. Introduction to Photography, Digital. 3. Fundamentals of Digital and Color photography. Students will learn how to use their digital cameras, how to input images to Photoshop and out put them to prints. The class will begin with an investigation of techniques before moving throuh a series of assignments designed to develop the understanding of how to compose a body of work around a specific theme or concept. Lectures will work through the concepts and history of color photography and regular critiques will guide students towards creating a final portfolio of images. Prerequisites: ART 1110, ART 1130.

2265. Introduction to Photography, Black and White. 3. Fundamentals of Black and White film photography, including use of SLR cameras, how to correctly expose film, process it and create prints in the darkroom. The class will begin with an investigation of techniques before moving through a series of assignments designed to develop the understanding of how to compose a body of work around a specific theme or concept. Lectures will work through the concepts and history of Black and White photography and regular critiques will guide students towards creating a final portfolio of images.

2305. Techniques: Wood/Plaster. 1. Studies by basic techniques, processes and skills as they apply to the fabrication of wood and plaster art forms. Emphasizes technical aspects of these media rather than completion of artistic problems. (Offered fall semester)

2350. Metalsmithing I. 3. Introduces basic technical approaches to fabricating small scale, non-ferrous metals (silver, copper, brass, nickel) including sawing, soldering, filing, drilling, form raising/pressing, texturing, and finishing processes. Investigation into the rich history of metalsmithing as well as innovative contemporary applications - sculpture and as body ornamentation - is fostered. A variety of individual projects in a studio environment alone with critical discussion and presentation addresses aesthetic, conceptual and technical aspects of metalsmithing. Prerequisite: ART 1120.

2410. Ceramics I. 3. Introduces ideas about ceramic form through various handbuilding construction techniques. Emphasizes design and conceptual development. Includes glaze application, surface decoration and kiln operation.

2420. Ceramics II. 3. Introduces ideas about ceramic form through wheel-throwing techniques. Emphasizes design and conceptual development. Includes glaze testing, glaze application, surface decoration and kiln operation. (Normally offered fall and spring semester)

2430. Combined Clay Methods. 3. A basic course in ceramics designed to introduce handbuilding and wheel throwing in one semester. The emphasis will be on developing an understanding of basic clay forming methods; developing surface treatments including slip, glaze and stains with an emphasis on low fire techniques, and understanding electric kiln firing and operation. Prerequisites: none.

2700. Introduction to Museology. 3. [(none)<>CH] Explores the historical, cultural, and contemporary roles of museums and preservation institutions in society. Introduces students to the museum professions, collection and exhibition installation strategies, and ethical problems of governance and collection. Field trips to regional collections are included. Cross listed with ANTH/AMST/HIST 2700. Prerequisite: WA.

2730. African Creativity and Ritual. 3. [C3,G1<>CA, G] In a thematic organization, explores both North African and sub-Saharan cultures, incorporating issues pertinent to art history, African American studies, anthropology, religious studies and women's studies. Looks at music, dance, body language, festival, celebration, coming of age rituals, fertility rites, harvest and funerals. Cross listed with AAST/ANTH 2730. Prerequisites: none.

3002. Special Topics In:. 3. Courses of broad general appeal will be offered from time to time under this title. Permits utilization of unusual faculty expertise and provides highly-specialized and particularly pertinent, timely subject matter. See current class schedule for topics. Prerequisites: ART 2010, Art History I and ART 2020, Art History II

3005. Drawing III. 3. An advanced drawing course applying the fundamentals of drawing to creative individual problems in figure, still life, and/or landscape composition. Structured yet open assignments, lectures and critiques develop formal, conceptual, expressive, and technical understanding. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 2005. (Offered spring semester).

3052. Life Drawing I. 3. An advanced drawing course working from a life model with an emphasis on composition, monocromatic media, drawing techniques and the skeletal and muscular construction as related to action and proportion in the human figure. Lectures, drawing sessions, and critiques develop formal, conceptual, and technical understanding. Prerequisite:  ART 2000 and 2005. (Normally offered fall semester)

3112 [2110]. Typography. 3. Examines the use of type, its history, structure and background in reference to the field of graphic design. Closely examines the relationship between typographical layout, concept and expression. Prerequisites: ART 2000 and ART 2112. (Offered spring semester)

3120. Graphic Design II. 3. Studies advanced graphic design preparation, idea generation, conceptualization, and critical thinking, from paste-up through production. All work is executed both on and off the computer. Design problems include print and packaging design. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 3112. (Offered fall semester)

3140. Print Production. 3. Explore the methods, vocabulary, and processes of commercial printing, including: the production and design process, color(ink) selection, duotones, paper selection, photography, diecutting, mailers & mailing regulations, finishing, pre-flighting and pre-press preparation, and communication with the printer. Projects will be focused around solving real-world printing problems. Prerequisites: ART 2000, 2122, ART 3112, ART 3120 or concurrent enrollment.

3180. Graphic Design III. 3. Studies specialized and advanced graphic design preparation, idea generation, conceptualization, and critical thinking, from paste-up through production. All work is executed both on and off the computer. Design problems include print and packaging design. History of graphic design and advanced production methods are discussed. Prerequisites: ART 2000, 3120, 3140.

3210. Painting II. 3 (Max. 6). Investigates various painting techniques to create individual work. Emphasizes contemporary and classical treatment of formal, aesthetic and conceptual creative expression. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 2210.

3250. Watercolor Painting I. 3. Investigates watercolor techniques in the development of creative work. Discussion, application and criticism of contemporary ideas about structure, form and color constitute the main activity. Prerequisites: ART 1130, ART 2000 and ART 2210. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

3265. Intermediate Photography. 3. Focuses on the production of a fully realized portfolio of images. Students will be guided with a set of conceptual projects towards exploring technical boundaries and potential of photography. Research and readings will lead towards the production of a finished and installed body of work. Prerequisites: ART 2255 and ART 2265.

3310. Sculpture: Cast Form I. 3 (Max. 6). Studies of casting processes in sculpture dealing with cold-casting: paper/fabric casting, and resin; metal casting, both non-ferrous and ferrous. Covers wide variety of mold-making techniques, as well as the traditional "lost wax" process, and will focus on finished presentation. Intensive inquiries into ideas of classic and contemporary sculpture are discussed as they relate to casting, as well as advanced research into student idea generation. Prerequisite: ART 1110, 1120, 1130, 1310 and 2000. (Offered fall semester)

3320. Sculpture: Mixed Media I. 3 (Max. 6). Studies use of the "found object" as a basic medium for three-dimensional expression. Includes additive processes, as well as discussing the history of the found object, and research focusing on mixed media artists. Processes include cold connection investigation, as well as hot fabrication-welding and forging. Prerequisite: ART 1110, 1120, 1130, 1310, and 2000. (Normally offered fall semester of every other year)

3330. Sculpture: Assembled Form I. 3 (Max. 6). Investigates constructed and assembled form as an essential means of sculptural expression. Emphasizes wood construction, assembled metals and mixed media. Utilizes general carpentry techniques, a variety of welding methods (oxyacetylene, arc, M.I.G. and T.I.G.) and other means of assembling materials. Includes investigation of concepts in assemblage and exposure to classic and contemporary forms of assembled sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 1110, 1120, 1130, 1310 and 2000. (Offered spring semester)

3345. Special Topics in Sculpture. 3 (Max. 9). Address specific areas of concern relevant to contemporary sculpture practice such as: Installation, Video/Sound manipulation, Kinetic Sculpture, Figurative Modeling, and Fabric/Fiber Fabrication. Assigned projects and research specific to the area of study will engage students in the production of artwork related to the topic. Extensive journal/sketchbook, artist research, and critique participation is required. Prerequisites: ART 2000.

3350. Metalsmithing II. 3. Introduces intermediate approaches to fabricating small scale, non-ferrous metals including etching, raised forms and silver casting. Historical and innovative contemporary applications - sculptural and body ornamentation-based - is fostered. Individual studio projects along with critical discussion and presentations address aesthetic, conceptual, and technical aspects of metalsmithing. Prerequisite:  ART 2000 and 2350.

3410. Advanced Ceramics I. 3. Studies development of ceramic form involving work in handbuilding and wheel techniques. Introduces surface treatment and glaze testing. Emphasizes design and conceptual development. Includes historical research. First semester of a one-year sequence. Prerequisite: completion of Foundation Core, ART 2000, ART 2410, ART 2420 and consent of instructor based on portfolio review. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

3420. Advanced Ceramics II. 3. Studies development of ceramic form involving work in handbuilding and wheel techniques. Introduction to surface treatment and glaze testing. Emphasizes design and conceptual development. Includes historical research. Second semester of a one-year sequence. Prerequisites: completion of Foundation Core, ART 2000, 2410, 2420, and consent of instructor  based on portfolio review. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

3500. Book Arts. 3. Introduction to the history of the book as an object and the traditional crafts associated with book construction through the exploration of the book as a vehicle for artistic expression. A basic knowledge of technical processes pertaining to book construction, a general familiarity with the history of the book and a conceptual exploration of image making will be gained through demonstrations, hands-on studio work, slide lectures, visits to the museum and archives and through assigned readings. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and completion of WB or junior standing.

3510. Printmaking I. 3. Investigates and experiments with processes and properties of print media, including intaglio, lithography and relief. Explores ideas and works of traditional and contemporary printmaking. Prerequisite: ART 1005 and ART 1110 and 1130 or concurrent registration in ART 1130.

3710. Gender: Humanities Focus. 3. [C1<>CH] Explores how men and women are imaged differently, studying the influence of representation on gender (including representations in literature, film, art, popular culture, and/or performance). Sharpens students' ability to analyze texts and images and investigate those texts' messages about gender, sexuality, ethnicity and class. Cross listed with ENGL/WMST 3710. Prerequisite: WMST 1080 or ENGL 1010. (Offered once a year)

3720 [2720] Art and Architecture of Medieval Islam. 3. [C1, G1<>(none)] Studies the art and architecture produced by Islamic societies from the time of the Prophet Mohammed to the time of the Crusades (7th-14th centuries CE), and the geographic scope surrounds the Mediterranean Sea, including the Near Middle East, northern Africa, and Spain. Prerequisites: USP WA and WB courses.

3760. American Art History. 3. Addresses American art within the continental United States from first European encounters with the New World to 1900.  Will investigate painting, sculpture, and architecture, but will also include some photography, prints, and the decorative arts. Prerequisites: ART 2020.

4000. Post Baccalaureate Seminar. 1.  Enhance and formalize the Post Baccalaureate experience while creating a creative community across artistic disciplines. Students will read and respond to relevent text, discuss pedagogical concerns, critique their creative research, and develop a professional dossier in support of their future career goals. Prerequisites: Completion of all BA/BFA degree requirements and acceptance into the Department of Art Post Baccalaureate program.

4005. Drawing IV. 3. An advanced drawing course exploring conceptual, expressive, personal and technical limits of process and media. Individually proposed projects lead to a coherent body of work. Open discussion and structured critiques develop personal and technical understanding. Repeatable for a maximum of 9 credit hours. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 3005.

4010 [4610]. Contemporary Art: Theory and Practice. 3 (Max. 6). Taught from the perspective of a studio artist, this course enables students to situate their art within a theoretical context. Students examine how issues in contemporary art relate to philosophical concerns through reading, discussion, and critique. Emphasis is placed on an interdisciplinary framework through which students can discuss their work. Prerequisite: ART 2000, junior standing.

4050. Advanced Drawing. 3. Advanced investigation of various drawing techniques are used to create individual work. Studies contemporary and classical treatment of line, composition and concepts using experimental and traditional treatment of drawing surface and materials. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 3005. (Normally offered spring semester)

4052. Life Drawing II. 3. An advanced drawing course building upon figure construction fundamentals with heavy emphasis on composition, personal expression, wet and dry media, and color with pastels. Lectures, drawing sessions and critiques develop formal, conceptual, expressive and technical understanding. May be repeated for a maximum 9 credit hours. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 3052 (Normally offered spring semester)

4110. Computer Graphics II. 3. Advanced work on current computer graphic design software. Presents graphic design problems to augment working knowledge of the programs. Lab/lecture. Second course in a two semester sequence. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 3120. (Normally offered spring semester)

4120. Senior Portfolio. 3 (Max. 6). Specialized research for the advanced graphic design student who will develop a mature style and sense of design. Problems include print, packaging, and multimedia design while also studying preparation techniques for job applications and professional skills. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 4110. (Normally offered fall semester)

4140. Professional Development in Graphic Design. 3. Explore the methods, vocabulary, and processes of professional development in graphic design including: portfolio production, creation of personal business forms, job searching, interviewing, networking, and personal portfolio website development. Projects will be focused around solving one's own real-world graphic design professional problems. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 4120.

4210. Painting III. 3 (Max. 6). Advanced investigation of various painting techniques are used to create individual works. Studies contemporary and classical treatment of forma. Aesthetic and conceptual creative expression. Students work from a proposed course of study and will be self-directed. Prerequisites: ART 2000 and 3210.

4250. Watercolor Painting II. 3. Advanced investigation of watercolor techniques in the development of creative work. Discussion, application and criticism of contemporary ideas about structure, form and color constitute the main activity. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 3250. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4265. Photography III. 3. An advanced photography class focusing on the production of a fully realized portfolio of images. Student's interests will help shape a course dedicated to providing them with additional technical tools (traditional printing techniques, high level photoshop tools) and reading and discussions designed to push them beyond the comfortable boundaries of their photographic world.

4310 [5310]. Sculpture: Cast Form II. 3 (Max. 6). Advanced exploration of various problems and themes of contemporary sculpture, focusing on the experimental development of personal vision, concepts, and style. Work produced for class is examined in light of historical and recent antecedents through slide discussions, critical reviews, and research projects. Students choose from a wide variety of materials and processes, with emphasis on a cold and hot casting. For students with professional motivation and commitment. Prerequisite: ART 2000, 6 hours of 2nd level sculpture and portfolio review by instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4330. Sculpture: Assembled Form II. 3 (Max. 6). An advanced investigation in constructed and assembled forms as an essential means of sculptural expression. Focus is on the experimental development of personal vision, concepts, and style using fabrication methods in wood, metal, and found object manipulation. Work produced for class is examined in light of historical and recent antecedents through slide discussions, critical reviews and research projects. For students with professional motivation and commitment. Prerequisites: ART 2000, 6 hours of Sculpture courses including ART 3330 and portfolio approved by instructor.

4355. Metalsmithing III. 3. Introduces advanced fabrication and surface techniques which build on skills developed in Metalsmithing I and II. Students propose a body of work for the semester based on individual aesthetic, conceptual and technical interests. Professional practices including resume writing, documenting, presenting and exhibiting artwork are addressed at this advanced level. Prerequisite:  ART 2000 and 3350.

4360. Metalsmithing: Special Topics. 3 (Max. 9). Focus is on specific techniques in the field of Metalsmithing for the semester's duration to allow for an in-depth exploration rotating between topics such as Grandulation, Sliver Clay, Silver Casting, and Cold Connections/Mechanisms. Assigned projects complement students' proposed body of sculptural or body ornamentation-based work. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 2350.

4400. Internship. 1-3 (Max. 9). Allows students to bridge the gap between theoretical problems solved in the classroom and the real work world. Students are placed in a setting where they perform duties similar to a working environment. Specific arrangements are made through the major area adviser. Students are evaluated at mid-term and finals. Minimum of three contact hours of internship per week for a semester equals an hour course credit. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 12 hours in the major area. (Normally offered fall, spring and summer)

4410. Ceramics Workshop I. 3. Studies and develops traditional and experimental forms. Applies wide range of three-dimensional decorative and conceptual approaches. Studio work is independently based on an individually directed theme of exploration. Historical and technical research. First semester of a one-year sequence. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 6 hours of ART 3320, 3410. (Offered fall semester of every other year)

4420. Ceramics Workshop II. 3. Continued study and development of traditional and experimental forms. Applies wide range of three-dimensional decorative and conceptual approaches. Studio work is independently based on an individually directed theme of exploration. Historical and technical research. Second semester of a one-year sequence. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 4410. (Offered spring semester of every other year)

4430. Lo-Tech Ceramics. 3. [C3<>(none)] Explores elementary forming, decorating and firing processes developed by various pottery cultures. Examines basic geology, clay prospecting, kiln design and construction. Includes historical overview and contemporary work survey. Dual listed with ART 5430. Prerequisite: ART 2000 and 12 hours of humanities/GED/USP. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4510. Printmaking II. 3 (Max. 6). Continues development of printmaking skills gained in introductory printmaking and focuses in particular on the relationship between process and image. Through demonstrations and studio work, slide lectures, visits to the museum and archives, and readings and discussions, technical processes will be refined, print history will be further explored and image making will continue to be developed. Prerequisite: completion of Foundation Core, ART 2000 and 3510.

4520. Advanced Printmaking II : Exhibition and Professional Preparation. 3 (Max. 6). Preparation  to continue as exhibiting artists. Students further develop their work as artist-printmakers in preparation for a solo or two-person exhibition at the completion of the semester. Presentation and execution of slides, resume, artist statement, locating opportunities and correspondence will be developed throughout the term. Prerequisites: ART 2000, 4510 and portfolio approval from instructor.

4600. Professional Practices and Strategies. 3 (Max. 6). This course offers information to junior/ senior level art majors in regards to: finding jobs in art, finding/applying for exhibition opportunities, applying/finding grant opportunities, furthering education including finding/applying for a Masters in art, and overall life possibilities after the completion of an undergraduate art degree. Writing is expected in the form of cover letters, resumes, artist statements, and project proposals. Prerequisites: 6 hours in Art and junior standing.

4620. Problems in Art. 1-3 (Max. 6). Special, current studio problems for advanced students. Prerequisite: 6 hours in art. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4635. Preparation for International Study in Art. 1. An introductory course to international study in art. Specifically focusing on various issues of culture, language, history, art and archeology the student may encounter while traveling abroad. Also provides time for the coordination of practical issues of travel, necessary documentation and insurance. Issues specific to the country of travel will also be addressed. Prerequisites: 6 hours in Art, WA, junior standing.

4640. Art and Ecology. 3. [C3, W3<>(none)] Focuses on the intersection of contemporary art with ecological concerns. Readings present philosophical, historical and cultural aspects of the art/ecology relationship; students reflect and question their own beliefs. Examples of art/artists are reviewed as well as how ecological artwork is developed. Students propose solutions and/or create art in, out of, or about the environment; local sites are encouraged. Prerequisite: 6 hours of art and/or American studies.

4650. International Study of Art. 3. [(none)<>G] Students will respond creatively to the historical, cultural and aesthetic experience in the country of travel and will use journaling, drawing, and collection of visual material to continue a more in-depth response upon return. Course sections will vary regarding structure/context. All sections will include studio and/or art historical curriculum. Prerequisite: ART 4635.

4660. Independent Study and Research. 1-5 (Max. 10). Research options in all creative areas. Students work independently and provide demonstrated ability and background knowledge to carry out self-directed research or creative activity in the research area. Arrangements regarding curricular obligations and meeting times are made with the instructor in advance. Prerequisites: ART 2000 and 12 hours of art in research area and prior consent of instructor. (Offered fall, spring and summer)

4670. Completion International Study in Art. 1. A completion course to international study in art. Students will compile and complete their response to their experiences encountered in the culture, language, history, art and archeology while traveling abroad. Concise structured critiques will provide time for discussion and digestion of their individual and shared experiences. When possible an exhibition of creative work will be included as a culmination of the program. Prerequisite: ART 4650.

4710. Art of the Medieval World. 3. Studies unique qualities of art of this intriguing era of transition between classical and renaissance times. Dual listed with ART 5710. Prerequisite: ART 1010 or 2010. (Normally offered fall semester of every other year)

4720. 15th Century Renaissance Art. 3. [C3<>(none)] Explores artistic developments of the 15th century, primarily in Italy, in order to appreciate the relationships between artistic production and innovation and other aspects of the social and cultural environment. Prerequisite: ART 2010, 2020. (Normally offered spring semester)

4730. 19th Century European Art. 3. [C1<>(none)] Studies 19th-century European painting, prints, and literature, covering Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism. Artists include Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun, court portraitist; Mary Cassatt and Edgar Degas, famed Impressionists; Edouard Manet, controversial and troubled; Honore Daumier, jailed for incendiary political cartooning; and the eccentric Paul Gauguin and Vincent Van Gogh. Prerequisite:  ART 2020. (Normally offered fall semester)

4740. 20th Century European Art. 3. [C1<>(none)] Studies 20th-century European art from 1900 to 1945. Covers the 2-D and 3-D art of Expressionism, Cubism, the Bauhaus, Dada and Surrealism, and other important movements in the first half of the 20th century. Prerequisites:  ART 2010 and 2020. (Normally offered spring semester)

4760. American Art in the 20th Century. 3. Studies 2-D and 3-D art in 20th-century America.  Topics will include art of the Gilded Age, the Jazz Age, the Progressive Era, the Great Depression, the World Wars, etc. Styles include American Impressionism, the Ashcan School, American Modernism, Social Realism, the Harlem Renaissance, Regionalism, Abstract Expressionism, and more. Prerequisites: ART 2010 and 2020. (Normally offered spring semester of every other year)

4770. Contemporary Arts Seminar. 3 (Max. 9). [C1<>(none)] Studies the major movements in the visual arts from 1945 to the present. Investigate major theories, stylistic movements, and key artists since WWII with a special focus on the increasing globalization of art during this era. Prerequisites: ART 2010 and 2020. (Normally offered fall semester of every other year)

4780. History of Women Artists. 3. [C3<>(none)] Studies documented influence of women as subjects, makers and receivers of art. Emphasizes careers and works of women over a wide range of times and places and under a variety of social circumstances. Greatly emphasizes developments in the 20th century. Cross listed with WMST 4780. Prerequisite: ART 2010 or ART 2020 or 3 hours of WMST courses; and WB. (Normally offered fall semester)

4790. Art Seminar. 1-3 (Max. 6). Special topic in art history and criticism for advanced students. Prerequisite: 6 hours in art history. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4830. Victorian Women's Lives: Their Art, Literature and Culture. [C1<>CA] Interdisciplinary approach to study of women's issues in art. Uses literary/cultural texts to reinforce/contradict and/or expand/enlarge the art historical basis. Topics include domestic goddess, working women, prostitution, education, marriage and divorce. Cross listed with ENGL/WMST 4830. Prerequisite: Either ART 2020 or WMST/ENGL 1080. (Normally offered every sixth semester)

5430. Lo-Tech Ceramics. 3. Exploration of elementary forming, decorating, firing processes developed by various pottery cultures. Examination of basic geology, clay prospecting, kiln design and construction. Includes historical overview and contemporary survey. Dual listed with ART 4430. Prerequisite: 12 hours of humanities/GED/USP.

5650. Art and Ideas. 3. Students in this seminar explore the literatures of art. Each seminar has a reading list and a thematic structure. Major critical papers are written during the course of the seminar. Required for M.A. and M.A.T. program Plan B option. Prerequisite: 30 hours in art.

5660. Investigations in Art. 1-5 (Max. 10). Research options in all the creative areas. The graduate student is expected to work independently and should provide demonstrated ability and background knowledge to carry out self-directed research or creative activity in the area to be studied. Arrangements regarding curricular obligations and meeting times must be contracted with the instructor in advance of enrollment. Prerequisite: completion of all 5000-level course work in the area of investigation.

5670. Term Creative Project. 1-5 (Max. 15). For M.F.A. candidates only; professional creative achievement in painting, drawing, printmaking, ceramics, or sculpture, leading to presentation of graduate exhibition. Typically, student will consult a single professor in major area for crediting this course. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy for M.F.A. degree and consent of instructor.

5710. Medieval Art. 3. Studies the unique qualities of art of this intriguing era of transition between classical and renaissance times. Dual listed with ART 4710. Prerequisite: Art 1010, 2010.

5740. 20th Century European Art. 3. Studies European art from 1900 to present. Dual listed with ART 4740. Prerequisite: ART 2010 and 2020, consent of instructor.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3 (Max. 3). Work in classroom with a major professor. Expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate status.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5959. Enrichment Studies. 1-3 (Max. 99). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisite: enrolled in a graduate degree program.

5990. Internship. 1-12. (Max 24). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

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