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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Chemistry (CHEM)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

1000. Introductory Chemistry. 4. [S2<>SP] Deals with principles of chemistry and some applications to inorganic chemistry. For students in family and consumer sciences, nursing, education, general arts and sciences and most agriculture curricula. Students who have credit in CHEM 1020 or 1050 may not receive duplicate credit for this course. Laboratory and discussion: 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in MATH 0925, or level 3 on the MPE, or ACT math score of 23 or above. (Normally offered fall semester)

1001. The Chemical Community. 1. [(none)<>I, L] A survey of chemistry both as a major and a discipline. Chemistry's historical role, the scientific method, scientific ethics, as well as current challenges in the major fields of chemistry are discussed. Information literacy is strongly emphasized, both by familiarization with university resources as well as specialized chemical databases. (Normally offered fall semester)

1020. General Chemistry I. 4. [S2<>SP] First semester of a one-year introductory series. Provides broad coverage of chemistry principles with inorganic and organic systems applications. Credit will not be allowed for more than one of CHEM 1020, 1050 and 1000. Laboratory and discussion: 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: ACT Math score of 23 or above, or concurrent enrollment in Math 1400, or 1405 or 1450. (Normally offered fall, spring and summer)

1030. General Chemistry II. 4. [S2<>SP] Second semester of a one-year introductory series. Provides broad coverage of chemistry principles with inorganic and organic systems applications. Credit will not be allowed for more than one of CHEM 1030 and 1060. Laboratory and discussion: 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1020. (Normally offered fall, spring and summer)

1050. Advanced General Chemistry I. 4. [S2<>SP] First semester of a one-year series covering chemical principles. Emphasizes inorganic chemistry and briefly discusses qualitative analysis. Credit not given for more than one of CHEM 1020, 1050 and 1000. Laboratory: 3 hours per week. Prerequisites: one year high school chemistry, and an ACT Math score of 27 or higher or concurrent enrollment in Math 2200. (Normally offered fall semester)

1060. Advanced General Chemistry II. 4. [S2<>SP] Second semester of a one-year series covering chemical principles. Emphasizes inorganic chemistry and briefly discusses qualitative analysis. Credit not given for more than one of CHEM 1030 and 1060. Laboratory: 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1050 or CHEM 1020, with permission of the instructor. (Normally offered spring semester)

2000. Special Topics in the Laboratory. 1 (Max. 4). Introduces students to laboratory experience in chemistry. Prerequisite: special permission from the chemistry department.

2230. Quantitative Analysis. 4. Broad, general coverage of analytical techniques, principles and calculations. Laboratory: 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1030, 1060 or equivalent. (Normally offered spring semester)

2300. Introductory Organic Chemistry. 4. Terminal course in organic and beginning biological chemistry. No credit will be allowed in CHEM 2300 if credit earned in CHEM 2420. Prerequisite: CHEM 1020, 1050, 1000 or equivalent. Note: This course is not an acceptable prerequisite for CHEM 2440. (Normally offered spring semester)

2420. Organic Chemistry I. 4. First semester of a one-year sequence in organic chemistry. Approached from the viewpoint of modern chemical theory, emphasizing structural and mechanistic concepts. The course incorporates a laboratory integrated with the lecture. Students desiring a one-semester terminal course should take CHEM 2300. Laboratory: 3 hours per week. No credit allowed in CHEM 2420 if credit earned in 2300. Prerequisite: CHEM 1030 or 1060. (Normally offered fall)

2440. Organic Chemistry II. 4. Second semester of a one-year sequence in organic chemistry. Approached from viewpoint of modern chemical theory, emphasizing structural and mechanistic concepts. The course incorporates a laboratory integrated with the lecture. Students desiring a one-semester terminal course should take CHEM 2300. Laboratory: 3 hours per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 1030 or 1060 and 2420. Note: CHEM 2300 is not an acceptable prerequisite for CHEM 2440. (Normally offered spring semester)

3020. Environmental Chemistry. 3. [M3<>(none)] Environment and modern environmental problems in terms of chemical structures and reactions. Chemical principles of equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamics are used to help understand our changing environment. Topics include toxicological chemistry, aquatic chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, and green chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 2300 or 2420; 2230; and QA course.

3550. Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences. 3. [M3<>(none)] Deals with areas of physical chemistry of interest to students majoring in the life sciences. Covers thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium and spectroscopy, using biological systems for development and illustration. Credit is allowed for only one of the courses: CHEM 3550 or 4507. Prerequisites: CHEM 1030, MATH 2200. (Normally offered every other year)

4000. Career Skills. 1. Designed to develop skills needed for success in the chemical profession or in graduate school. Topics include information on graduate programs, resume preparation, scientific writing, oral presentation, technical seminars, and laboratory note keeping. Available S/U only. Prerequisites: chemistry major, CHEM 4110 or concurrent enrollment. (Normally offered fall semester)

4040. Chemical Literature. 1-2 (Max. 2). Introduces literature of chemistry and methods employed in searching the literature. Prerequisites: CHEM 2300 or 2420; CHEM 4507 or 3550 or concurrent enrollment; scientific German recommended. (Normally offered alternating spring semesters)

4050. Solar Energy Conversion. 3. Provides an overview of the science behind current and future solar thermal and photovoltaic technologies. Environmental aspects, legal issues and cost associated with solar energy will also be included. Cross listed with ERS 4050. Prerequisites: CHEM 1030 or CHEM 1060 and PHYS 1210 or PHYS 1310 and MATH 2200. (Offered spring semester)

4100. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. 2. Introduces basic inorganic laboratory synthetic techniques and methods of analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 2440 and 4110 or concurrent enrollment. (Offered fall semester)

4110. Introductory Inorganic Chemistry. 3. A basic course on theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Dual listed with CHEM 5110. Prerequisite: CHEM 2420. (Normally offered fall semester)

4230. Instrumental Methods of Chemical Analysis. 4. Introduces optical, electroanalytical and separation methods of analysis, emphasizing practical industrial applications. Prerequisite: CHEM 2230. (Normally offered fall semester)

4400. Biological Chemistry. 3. Covers the main principles of biological chemistry from a chemical standpoint. Highlights the chemical structure of biological molecules and examines biological processes with emphasis on the underlying organic chemistry. Introduces biological NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical methods. Discusses main metabolic pathways. Dual listed with CHEM 5400. Prerequisite: CHEM 2440 or consent of instructor.

4507. Physical Chemistry I. 3. [M3<>(none)] First semester of a one-year sequence. Emphasis on introductory quantum mechanics, atomic structure, molecular bonding and structure and spectroscopy. Kinetic molecular theory of gasses may be introduced. Uses multivariable calculus, differential equations and some linear algebra. Prerequisites: one year of general chemistry, multivariable calculus, one year of general college physics. (Normally offered fall semester)

4508. Physical Chemistry II. 3. [M3<>(none)] Second semester of a one year sequence, emphasizes kinetic theory of gasses and non-ideal solutions, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, statistical thermodynamics, and reaction kinetics. Uses multivariable calculus and differential equations. Prerequisite: CHEM 4507. (Normally offered spring semester)

4515. Applied Mathematics in Physical Chemistry I. 3. Designed to introduce the necessary mathematical background and essential computer programming tools for students of physical and theoretical chemistry. This includes an introduction into linear algebra, multivariate calculus, differential equations, analysis and modeling of experimental data, use of Matlab software and mathematical analysis of physical chemistry problems. Dual listed with CHEM 5515. Prerequisites: MATH 2200 and 2205, CHEM 1020/1030 or 1050/1060.

4516. Applied Mathematics in Physical Chemistry II. 3. Covers the advanced mathematical techniques in physical and theoretical chemistry. This includes introduction into probability and stochastic processes, infinite series, vector and tensor calculus, Fourier transforms and partial differential equations. Includes practical numerical problem solutions using MatLab software and applications of the mathematical analysis to specific physical chemistry problems. Dual listed with CHEM 5516. Prerequisite: CHEM 4515.

4525. Physical Chemistry Lab I. 1. Illustrates principles of physical chemistry, techniques of measurement, and analysis and interpretation of data with an emphasis on quantum mechanical (spectroscopic) methodologies. Prerequisites: CHEM 4507 or concurrent enrollment.

4530. Physical Laboratory II. 1. Illustrates principles of physical chemistry, techniques of measurement, and analysis and interpretation of data with emphasis on thermodynamic methodologies. Laboratory: 3 hours per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 4525 and CHEM 4508, or concurrent enrollment. (Normally offered spring semester)

4560. Molecular Modeling - Computational Chemistry. 3. Emphasizes training in computational, electronic and vibrational structure, calculations ranging from molecular mechanics to semi-empirical to ab-initio methods. Dual listed with CHEM 5560. Prerequisite: CHEM 4507. (Normally offered alternating spring semesters)

4920. Special Problems in Chemistry. 1-3 (Max. 6). Probes deeply into special areas of chemistry through library or laboratory work. Taken under supervision of faculty in the area of the investigation. Laboratory: 3-9 hours per week. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Offered every semester)

4930. Undergraduate Research. 1-3 (Max. 9). Research activities on a chemical project of limited scope or as part of a laboratory project of great scope. A written report  is submitted to the department each semester of enrollment. Laboratory: 4-12 hours per week. Prerequisites: chemistry major and consent of instructor. (Offered every semester)

The following courses are offered for S/U credit only: CHEM 5000, CHEM 5150, CHEM 5190, CHEM 5290, CHEM 5310, CHEM 5390, CHEM 5501, CHEM 5590, CHEM 5790, CHEM 5900, CHEM 5920, CHEM 5940, CHEM 5960, CHEM 5980, and special sections of CHEM 5100, CHEM 5200, CHEM 5300, and CHEM 5500 offered during Summer Session.

5000. Seminar in Chemistry. 1 (Max. 3). All graduate students attend weekly departmental seminars. One credit given each semester a presentation is made, to a limit of 3 credits for M.S. candidate, 6 for Ph.D. candidates. The seminar will normally be based upon articles in the current chemical literature but with the last presentation being over the student's research project. Offered satisfactory/unsatisfactory only. Prerequisite: graduate standing in chemistry or biochemistry.

5100. Special Topics in Advanced Inorganics. 1-9 (Max. 12). A course designed for students with an interest in contemporary inorganic chemistry. Recent problems in the literature and techniques for their solution will be addressed.

5110. Inorganic Chemistry. 3. A basic course on theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Dual listed with CHEM 4110. Prerequisite: CHEM 2320 or CHEM 2420, and physical chemistry.

5115. Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry. 3. Advanced survey of inorganic chemistry, emphasizing the synthesis, structural, and reactivity properties of inorganic compounds. Emphasis will be placed on the application of bonding theory and periodic principles to the chemistry of main-group, d-block, and f-block elements. Prerequisite: CHEM 5110.

5120. Chemical Applications of Symmetry Group Theory. 3. The essential principles of group theory as used by practicing chemists. Fundamentals of symmetry and the theory of groups. Applications to problems of spectroscopy, structure and bonding. Prerequisite: CHEM 4110 and either CHEM 4508 or 5530.

5130. Physical Methods of Inorganic Chemistry. 1-3 (Max. 3). A course to survey the spectroscopic methods (electronic, vibrational, rotational, magnetic resonance, quadrupole resonance, Mossbauer, mass) which are used to elucidate the structure and bonding in inorganic and organometallic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 4507 or 4110/5110.

5140. Organometallic Chemistry. 3. A survey of bonding and synthetic reactions of transition metal organometallic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 4110/5110.

5150. Inorganic Group Seminar. 1 (Max. 9). Course designed for students with an interest in contemporary inorganic chemistry. Recent problems in the literature and techniques for their solution are addressed.

5160. Bioinorganic Chemistry. 3. Biological chemistry of metals and non-metals will be used to illustrate the fundamental role that they play in all aspects of life. Recent examples and problems in the current literature will be used to illustrate how chemically imposed restrictions and limitations are surmounted in living systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 4110/5110.

5190. Research in Inorganic Chemistry. 1-3 (Max. 12). Offered satisfactory/unsatisfactory only. Prerequisite: CHEM 4110/5110.

5200. Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry. 1-6 (Max. 12). Material selected from chromatography, electroanalytical chemistry, ion exchange, chemical separations, optical methods of analysis, polarography and other areas. Prerequisite: CHEM 4230, 4507, and 5210.

5210. Advanced Survey of Chemical Analysis. 3. A basic course to provide a background in many aspects of quantitative analysis taught at an advanced graduate-level. Prerequisite: CHEM 2230 and 4507.

5220. Modern Electroanalytical Methods. 3. An advanced survey of electroanalytical chemistry including ion selective potentiometry, electrolysis, coulometry, polarography and voltammetry. Prerequisite: CHEM 5210.

5240. Optical Methods of Chemical Analysis. 3. An advanced survey of the theory, instrumentation and applications of optical methods of chemical analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 4230, 4507, 5210.

5250. Advanced Chemical Instrumentation. 3. Introduces chemistry students to the basic elements of electronics. Specific topics include networks, passive and active filters, digital electronics, logic gates, counters, flip-flops, and converters. Second half of course introduces students to experimental design, pattern recognition, factorial analysis, and multivariate statistical methods. Prerequisite: CHEM 4230 or its equivalent.

5260. Separation Methods. 3. A detailed survey of the theoretical and practical aspects of modern separation methods with emphasis on chromatography. Prerequisite: CHEM 2230, CHEM 2440, and CHEM 4508.

5290. Research in Analytical Chemistry. 1-3 (Max. 12). Satisfactory/unsatisfactory only. Prerequisite: CHEM 2230, 4507.

5300. Special Topics Synthetic. 1-6 (Max. 9). Material will be selected from one of the following areas: heterocycles, organometallics, natural products, physical and chemical methods of structure elucidation, organic photochemistry, and other special areas of organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 5330.

5310. Organic Group Seminar. 1 (Max. 9). Designed for students with an interest in organic reaction mechanisms. A problem solving approach using electron pushing techniques will be emphasized. Prerequisite: CHEM 5340.

5320. Spectroscopic Methods of Structure Determination. 3. Provides theoretical and practical treatment of spectroscopic methods for application in research. Topics include ultraviolet, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Prerequisite: CHEM 2440, 4507.

5330. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 3. Treatment of organic chemistry from the viewpoints of structure and mechanism with emphasis on structural theory of bonding, stereochemistry and the general classes of organic reactions. Prerequisite: CHEM 2440 and 4507.

5340. Synthetic  Methods in Organic Chemistry. 3. Surveys and applies the important synthetic methods of organic chemistry with particular attention to recent developments. Prerequisite: CHEM 5330.

5350. Advanced Organic Chemistry II. 3. Second semester of a two semester sequence with a focus on the detailed mechanisms of the major classes of reactions of importance in organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 5330.

5390. Research in Organic Chemistry. 1-3 (Max. 12). Prerequisite: CHEM 5320.

5400. Biological Chemistry. 3. Covers the main principles of biological chemistry from a chemical standpoint. Highlights the chemical structure of biological molecules and examines biological processes with emphasis on the underlying organic chemistry. Introduces biological NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical methods. Discusses main metabolic pathways. Dual listed with CHEM 4400. Prerequisite: CHEM 2440 or consent of instructor.

5500. Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. 1-6 (Max. 9). Material will be selected from one of the following fields: electrochemistry, surface chemistry, catalysis, colloids, photochemistry, and other special fields of physical chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 4507 and 5510.

5501. Physical Group Seminar. 1-9 (Max. 9). Designed for students with an interest in theoretical and experimental physical chemistry. Students are required to give presentations on current literature and research topics. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5515. Methods of Applied Mathematics in  Physical Chemistry I. 3. Designed to introduce the necessary mathematical background and essential computer programming tools for students of physical and theoretical chemistry. Includes an introduction into linear algebra, multivariate calculus, differential equations, analysis and modeling of experimental data, use of Matlab software, and mathematical analysis of physical chemistry problems. Dual listed with CHEM 4515. Prerequisites: MATH 2200 and 2205, 1 yr. CHEM 1020/1030 or 1050/1060.

5516. Applied Mathematics in Physical Chemistry. 3. Covers the advanced mathematical techniques in physical and theoretical chemistry. This includes an introduction into probability and stochastic processes, infinite series, vector and tensor calculus, Fourier transforms and partial differential equations. Includes practical numerical problem solutions using Matlab software and applications of the mathematical analysis to specific physical chemistry problems. Dual listed with CHEM 4516. Prerequisites: CHEM 4515/5515.

5520. Advanced Chemical Thermodynamics and Thermostatics. 3. A rigorous presentation of classical chemical thermodynamics followed by an introduction to statistical mechanics with the application to real systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 4508 and 4507.

5530. Quantum Chemistry. 3. The quantum mechanical description of time-dependent and independent processes, including discussions of the Schrodinger equation, wave packets, approximate methods, and interaction of matter with radiation. Prerequisite: two semesters of undergraduate physical chemistry.

5540. Molecular Spectroscopy. 3. Introduction to the relationships among quantum mechanical formulations, experimentally determinable quantities obtained via spectroscopic methods, and physical parameters related to the structure of molecular systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 5530.

5550. Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Dynamics. 3. Emphasizes the rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions and reaction dynamics which reviews the kinetic theory of gases, conventional transition state theory, Arrhenius theory, applications of Laplace transforms, thermodynamics of the transition state, reactions in solution and on surfaces, and other current topics as time permits. Prerequisite: CHEM 4507.

5560. Molecular Modeling - Computational Chemistry. 3. A course that emphasizes training in computational, electronic and vibrational structure, calculations ranging from molecular mechanics to semi-empirical to ab-initio methods. Dual listed with CHEM 4560. Prerequisite: CHEM 4507.

5570. Statistical Mechanics. 3. Course content will include Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, ensembles, partition functions, transition state theory, thermodynamic pertubation techniques, quantum statistics, and time-correlation formalism. Prerequisites: CHEM 4508 and 4507 and MATH 2205.

5590. Research in Physical Chemistry. 1-3 (Max. 12). Prerequisite: CHEM 4507.

5760. Polymer Chemistry. 3. A course covering the principles of polymer synthesis and characterization. Prerequisite: CHEM 2230, 2340, 4507.

5790. Research in Biological Chemistry. 1-3 (Max. 12). Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5820. Advanced Problems in Chemistry. 1-3 (Max. 3). A graduate level course for students desiring to probe more deeply into a special area of chemistry. Taken under the supervision of a faculty member in the field of investigation. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3 (Max 3). Work in classroom with a major professor. Expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate status.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5959. Enrichment Studies. 1-3 (Max. 99). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisites: enrolled in a graduate degree program.

5980. Dissertation Research. 1-12 (Max. 48). Designed for students who are involved in research for their dissertation project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their dissertation. Prerequisites: enrolled in a graduate level degree program.

5990. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 24). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

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