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University Catalog

English (ENGL)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 2003 USP code followed by the 2015 USP code (i.e. [QB<>Q]).

JumpLink1010. College Composition and Rhetoric. 3. [WA<>COM1] A composition course emphasizing expository writing, analytical reading, and academic and civic argumentation in a range of print, oral, and digital genres. A grade of C or better is required to meet the COM1 requirement. Students may not have credit in both ENGL 1010 and UWYO 1000, 1110 or 1210.

1030. Intellectual Community in Cinema Etc. 3. [I<>{none}] Introduces students to a range of issues within the humanities through the analysis of film, television, and theater.

1080. Introduction to Women's Studies. 3. [CH,D<>{none}] An introduction to key issues in women's studies. A topical examination of women's participation in and relationship to institutions of society, such as family and school, as well as processes and activities, such as work, art, and politics in historical and cross-cultural analysis. Cross listed with WMST 1080. (Offered both semesters)

1101. First-Year Seminar. 3. [{none}<>FYS]

JumpLink2005. Writing in Technology and the Sciences. 3. [WB<>COM2] Develops writing styles specifically suited to technological and scientific fields of study. Includes focus on disciplinary conventions and styles as well as audience/readership considerations. Introduces techniques for data interpretation and visualization, and helps students analyze, understand, and adapt common field genres and formats. Prerequisite: successful completion of WA/COM1.

2015. College Composition and Rhetoric II: College and Career. 3. [{none}<>COM2] ENGL 2015 helps students become stronger writers, speakers, and thinkers, and features assignments that explore issues that pertain to students’ majors and future careers. Students will engage in different genres for a range of audiences, revise substantially, and practice critical thinking in academic, civic, and professional contexts. Prerequisite: ENGL/Synergy 1010 (COM1).

2020. Literature, Media and Culture. 3. [CH,WB<>COM2] Introduces students to the basic tools of literary, film, and media analysis and develops students' critical writing, digital analysis, and oral communication skills. No expertise in literary criticism or film theory is necessary in this course; all majors are welcome. Prerequisite: COM1. COM1 may not be taken concurrently.

2025. Introduction to English Studies. 3. [{none}<>COM2]. This course provides an introducation to English Studies, covering the history of English as an academic field, the options available within it, and possible career paths. Students will also be taught the skills they need to succeed as English majors, including critical reading and writing, and literary and rhetorical analysis. Prerequisite: COM1; English major status.

2035. Writing for Public Forums. 3. [WB<>COM2] Introduction to professional writing that focuses on analyzing and producing texts designed to influence public opinion. Genres may include letters, editorials, web pages, pamphlets, e-mail, speeches, and position papers. Focuses on skills in collaboration and use of technology necessary for ethical, effective participation in public discourse. Prerequisite: WA/COM1.

2125. Writing Tutor Pedagogy/Practicum. 3. [WB<>COM2] Prepares students for professional employment as writing tutors in a writing center environment. Students will gain a detailed understanding of the history of writing centers, the development of writing center studies and theory, and the innovative trends in contemporary writing center practices and organization. Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 or COM1/transfer equivalent with a grade of B or higher; 3.000 GPA or higher.

2170. The Bible as Literature. 3. A study of the Bible as a body of literary expression with an introduction to critical technique appropriate to such study. Prerequisite: WA/COM1.

2190. African Literature. 3. A study of the modern literature of Africa written in English, against its background of the continent's oral traditions. Prerequisite: WA/COM1.

2240. Arthurian Legend. 3. An introduction to both Arthurian romance and writing about literature. Traces the Arthurian Legend from its roots in Welsh mythology through its development in the Middle Ages and to its current manifestations in popular culture. Prerequisite: WA/COM1; sophomore standing.

2340. Native American Culture and Literature. 3. [CH,D<>{none}] Broad cultural study of Native Americans, past and present. Emphasizes folklore and literature. Cross listed with NAIS 2340. Prerequisite: WA/COM1.

2345. American Indians in Hollywood Film. 3. [CH,D<>{none}] Examines the ways Hollywood film has constructed various forms of racial identity for American Indians. Cross listed with NAIS 2345. Prerequisite: WA/COM1.

2350. Introduction to African American Literature. 3. [WB,D<>{none}] Provides an introduction to the major works of the African American literary tradition. Covering a wide range of fiction, poetry, drama, and autobiography, the course introduces students to some of the most exciting works of literature ever to appear in America. Cross listed with AAST 2350. Prerequisite: WA/COM1.

2360. Mexican American Literature. 3. [CH,D<>H] Discusses literary reflections of Chicanoism. Studies literature of the Hispanic Southwest, Mexican-American folklore and the contemporary Chicano movement. Cross listed with LTST 2360. Prerequisite: WA/COM1.

2410. Literary Genres. 3. (Max. 6). [CH,WB<>H] Studies specific genres of literature. Emphasis will vary (poetry, fiction, drama, etc.) from semester to semester, depending on curricular needs. Prerequisite: WA/COM1.

2425. Literatures in English I. 3. [CH<>{none}] Surveys major figures and literary movements in literatures written in English through 1750. Prerequisite: WA/COM1.

2430. Literatures in English II. 3. [CH<>{none}] Surveys major figures and literary movements in literatures written in English 1750-1865. Prerequisite: WA/COM1.

2435. Literatures in English III. 3. [CH<>{none}] Surveys major figures and literary movements in literatures written in English 1865-present. Prerequisite: WA/COM1.

2490. Studies in_____. 1‑6 (Max. 6). Presents a variety of topics in literature. Prerequisite: WA/COM1.

JumpLink3000. Literary Theory. 3. An introduction to critical theory as a methodology within literary studies. The course covers major schools of theory and major figures within those schools. Students will read, discuss, and write about literary texts and cultural artefacts by placing them in dialogue with important works of both theory and literary criticism. Prerequisites: ENGL 2025 and junior standing.

3010. Approaches to Rhetoric, Composition Pedagogy, and Professional Writing. 3. Introduces common methods, concepts, and theories emphasized in these interrelated intellectual traditions. It asks students to examine how research traditions have developed alongside each other over time, and prepares students to design a multimodal research project. Prerequisites: ENGL 2025 and junior standing.

3020. Culture, Communication, Work. 3. [{none}<>COM3] Examines individual identity and group cultures, and how they influence communication in the workplace. Helps students develop strategies for working across cultural differences and for effective negotiation and conflict resolution skills. Prerequisite: Completion of COM2.

3100. Tribal Literatures of the Great Plains. 3. [D,WC<>{none}] Familiarizes students with American Indian literatures of the Great Plains. The Great Plains region is the locus of much historical and contemporary significance in regard to American Indian cultures. The literature of Great Plains Indians allows students to confront and reexamine the national narratives surrounding American Indians. Cross listed with NAIS 3100. Prerequisite: 6 hours of NAIS or ENGL.

3150. World Literature. 3 (Max. 6). [CH,G<>{none}] Encompasses reading and analysis of major works representative of significant periods or literary forms in the history of literature. Prerequisite: WA and WB/COM1 and COM2.

3200. Topics in: Medival Literature. 3 (Max. 12). This course focuses on the language, literature, history, and culture of England between 800 and 1485, including influential texts from continental and Arabic traditions. Students will be taught to read Middle English and the class will include a translation component. Prerequisites: COM1 and 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses.

3300. Topics in: Renaissance Literature. 3 (Max. 12). Surveys important authors and texts from Britain, Europe, and the “new world” from 1500-1642. Covers major literary movements and genres, and contextualizes materials by discussing the historical, cultural, and political developments of the period. Examines how literature is produced and consumed in the sixteenth century. Specific focus varies by section. Prerequisites: COM1 and 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses.

3330. Global Shakespeare in Performance. 3. Shakepeare’s works are constantly being reinterpreted around the globe, because their cultural capital invites many cultures to rebrand Shakespeare as their own. While helping us to see universal connections, recorded re-interpretations provide opportunities for viable cross-cultural analysis, as we explore and compare the hot-button cultural issues addressed through global performance. Prerequisite: COM1.

3340. Philosophy in Literature. 3 (Max 6). Examines central themes in literary works with philosophical significance; studies related general issues. Issues include questions of interpretation, criticism, and translation, as well as the possibility of direct philosophical influence on authors. Cross listed with ENGL
3340. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy or one course in literature or consent of instructor.

3400. Topics in: Eighteenth-Century Literature. 3 (Max. 12). Topics in eighteenth-century American and/or British literatures. Readings situated amid the historical and social developments of the era, including the expansion of mercantilism and slavery, the spread of secularism, the rise of print capitalism, and the emergence of new ideas of self and authorship. Subject matter varies by section. Prerequisites: COM1, ENGL 2025, and 3 hours of a 2000-level literature course.

3500. Topics in: Nineteenth-Century Literature. 3 (Max. 12). This course surveys authors, movements, and/or genres significant to 19th Century American or British literature, and contextualizes materials by discussing the historical, cultural, and political developments of the period. Prerequisites: COM1 and 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses in ENGL.

3600. Topics in: 20th Century Literature. 3 (Max. 12). Surveys important authors and texts from Britain, the U.S., and around the world from 1900 to present-day. Covers major literary movements and genres, including modernism and postmodernism, and contextualizes materials by discussing the historical, cultural, and political developments of the period. Examines how literature is produced in our contemporary moment. Prerequisites: COM1 and 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses in ENGL.

3610. Non-Western Women Writers. 3. Examines literature written by women in non-western cultures. The geographical region, time period, and genres of literature may vary by semester. Analyzes representations of such topics as family, marriage, sexuality, community, and colonialism as expressed in fiction, drama, literary non-fiction, and/or poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL 1010 or WMST 1080; junior standing.

3710. Gender: Humanities Focus. 3. [CH<>COM2] Explores how men and women are imaged differently, studying the influence of representation on gender (including representations in literature, film, art, popular culture, and/or performance). Sharpens students' ability to analyze texts and images and investigate those texts' messages about gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and class. Cross listed with ART/WMST 3710. Prerequisite: WMST 1080 or ENGL 1010.

JumpLink4000 [3000]. 21st Century Issues in Professional Writing. 3. [WC<>COM3] Examines ethical, cultural, and practical issues for writers in complex, real-world scenarios that pose communication challenges. Focuses on applying fundamental principles of rhetoric, effective research methods, analytical skills, and design technologies to collaborative and individual problem-based projects. Prerequisites: WA and WB/COM1 and COM2; completion of one of the following: ENGL 2005, 2035, 4010, 4020, 4025, or 4075; junior or senior standing.

4010. Technical Writing in the Professions. 3. [WC<>COM3] Enhances professional writing skills applicable to a variety of professions. Includes audience analysis and adaptation, information design and use of visuals, and a range of formats and genres. Emphasizes clarity and precision of language. May feature primary research and problem-based or service-learning projects. Prerequisites: WA and WB or COM1 and COM2; junior or senior standing. 

4020. Editing for Publication. 3. Theory and practice of editing in the contexts of book, magazine, newspaper, and web-based publications. Standard editing practices for using grammar, proofreading marks, and computer editing tools. Prerequisite: WA/COM1, WB/COM2 (ENGL 2035 and 3000 recommended).

4025 [3050]. Writing for the Web. 3. [WC,L<>COM3] Covers a variety of issues relevant for composing in the 21st century. As students learn to design and generate effective writing for a particular audience in a digital environment, they will also develop skills with advanced web and print research, basic HTML programming language, and standard web design software. Prerequisite: WB/COM2 and junior standing.

4030. Writing for Magazines. 3. Students write a variety of articles that would be appropriate for submission to a magazine. Feedback is given through class workshops and consultation with the instructor. Award-winning articles are read and discusses. The business aspect of magazine writing is also covered. Prerequisite: COM1, COM2, and junior standing.

4061. Rhetorical Theory and Criticism. 3. An investigation into how rhetorical theory, spanning from its ancient roots in Aristotelian thinking to its current postmodern components, operates in society. Explores how various critical methods can be utilized to gain a stronger understanding of public communication texts, including newspapers, speeches, music, and film. Cross listed with COJO 4061; dual listed with ENGL 5061. Prerequisite: COJO 1040 and 3040 or ENGL 2035.

4070. Film Directors:____ 3 (Max. 6). Offers an intensive examination of representative films by selected film makers. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4075. Writing for Non-Profits. 3. [WC<>COM3] Designed for students interested in working in the non-profit sector. Explores rhetorical, political, and social dimensions of writing and communicating in the non-profit world and features intensive study of special topics and problems related to non-profit communication, including activism, grant writing, organizational rhetoric, and non-profit genres. Content varies. Prerequisite: WB/COM2.

4080. Film Genre Studies:____. 3 (Max. 6). Offers structural, film historical, and political analyses of selected major film genres. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4090. Film and Religion. 3. Movies use religion to convey messages; they debate religious issues and use religion to debate non-religious issues. This course analyzes how film makers use religion and religious themes to transform religions into advocates for social issues and to shape religion's role in society. Popular films drawn from many genres. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level or higher literature courses or religion courses or consent of instructor.

4110. Shakespeare: Romantic Comedies and History Plays. (B) 1.5-4 (Max. 4). Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4120. Shakespeare: Tragedies and Romances. (B) 1.5-4 (Max. 4). Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4140. English Drama: Restoration and Eighteenth Century. (B) 3. A study of the development of the drama from 1660 to 1800, including comedy of manners, heroic drama, tragedy, sentimental comedy, laughing comedy, satire, ballad opera, and burlesque. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4150. Modern Drama. 3. Focuses on development and shape of modern theatre. Plays are treated as dramatic literature, performed art, and manifestations of a social and philosophical milieu. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4160. Chaucer. 3. A study of the major works. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor. (Alternates with ENGL 4180).

4170. Early English Renaissance Literature: Sixteenth Century. 3. A study of prose, poetry, and drama from More through Shakespeare. Also studies developments in primary genres, styles, aesthetic values, and intellectual concerns of the period's literature. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4180. Middle English Literature. 3. Surveys the literature of medieval England from the early thirteenth century to the mid-fifteenth century. Focuses on language, literature, and cultural history. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor. (Alternates with ENGL 4160).

4200. Later English Renaissance Literature: Seventeenth Century. 3. A study of prose, poetry, and drama from Bacon and Donne through Browne and Behn. Also studies developments in the primary genres, styles, aesthetic values, and intellectual concerns of the literature of the period. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4210. English Literature of the Eighteenth Century: Restoration to Mid-Century. 3. A survey of poetry, satire, comedy of manners, and the early novel, as well as literary, cultural, historical, and philosophical works from the age of Dryden through the age of Swift and Pope. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4220. English Literature of the Eighteenth Century: Mid- to Late- Century. 3. A study of poetry, the novel, development of literary criticism, historical and cultural commentary, and biography from the age of Johnson and Boswell to the beginnings of romanticism. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4230. Greek Tragedy. 3. Reading and discussion of major plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, together with examination of the performance and social context of Greek drama, its use of traditional myths, and selected issues in contemporary scholarship on the tragedies. Cross listed with CLAS/THEA 4230. Prerequisite: WB or COM2. (Offered in spring in alternate years)

4240. English Literature of the Nineteenth Century: Romantic Period. 3. A study of prose and poetry of authors who flourished between 1789-1832, such as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Bryon, Lamb, Hazlitt, Austen, and Scott. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4245. Jane Austen. 3. A study of all the surviving work, published and unpublished, of this master of the modern novel, along with selected work by other authors supplying cultural and literary contexts. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses.

4250. Poetry of the Victorian Age. 3. A study of major poetic forms practiced by Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and their successors. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4260. English Prose Literature of the Victorian Age. 3. A study of political, social, economic, religious, and aesthetic ideas, as analyzed by representative authors from Carlyle and Mill to the end of the century. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4270. Classical Epic Poetry. 3. Reading and discussion of major works of Greek and Latin epic poetry, centered on Homer and Vergil. Also includes consideration of the background of these works (both mythological and historical) and the development of the epic tradition in the ancient world. Cross listed with CLAS 4270. Prerequisite: WB or COM2.

4280. Modern British Fiction. 3. Covers the novel in British literature from 1920 to present. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4310. The English Novel: Eighteenth Century to Early Nineteenth Century. 3. Spans the novel's formative (experimental) period, to its Gothic moment. Representative authors from Defoe to Scott. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4320. The English Novel: Nineteenth Century to Early Twentieth Century. 3. Spans the novel's Victorian (realist) manifestation, to its Modernist reconsideration. Representative authors from Dickens to Woolf. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4340. Modern Poetry. 3. A study of selected aspects of modern poetry, including poets, poems, poetics, and other relevant matter, mainly in Britain and the United States, between the mid-nineteenth century and present. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4360. American Prose: Early Through Mid-Nineteenth Century. 3. A study of major fiction and relevant non-fiction, written in America from the beginning through the middle of the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4635. English Department Honors. 0. Satisfactory completion of this course indicates that English Departmental Honors have been conferred on the student. Prerequisite: successful completion and defense of English Honors thesis.

4370. American Prose: 1865-1920. 3. A study of major fiction written in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in relation to rise of realism and naturalism. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4430. Modern American Fiction. 3. Covers the novel in American literature from 1920 to present. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4450. African American Novel. 3. [D<>{none}] Considers aesthetic dimension and cultural matrix of novels written by Black Americans. Cross list with AAST 4450. Prerequisite: AAST 1000, any AAST 2000-level course, junior/senior standing, six hours of 2000-level literature courses in ENGL.

4455. Slavery and Freedom. 1-4 (Max. 8). [D<>{none}] Students engage in an in-depth study of the literary voices that emerged from the history of enslavement in the Americas from colonial times through the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Dual listed with ENGL 5455; cross listed with AAST 4455. Prerequisite: AAST 1000, any AAST 2000 level course, and Junior or Senior Standing, or six credit hours of literature courses in ENGL.

4460. American Indian Literature. 3. [WC<>{none}] Advanced critical study of the history of American Indian literature, emphasizing the authors' views of social change. Cross listed with NAIS 4460. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4470. Studies in Chicano Folklore. 3. [CH,D<>H] Provides a survey of the origins, development and contemporary folklore of the Mexican American Chicano people of the United States with comparative relation to Mexico and other groups in the United States. Cross listed with LTST 4470. Prerequisite: LTST 1100 and WA/COM1.

4480. Regional Literature of the U.S.: The West. 3. Encompasses major themes and writers in western American literature. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4600. Studies in _____. 1-6 (Max. 12). Presents from semester to semester a variety of significant topics in American, English, or other literatures. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4610. Special Studies Abroad in _____. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses or consent of instructor.

4620. Independent Reading in _____. 1-3 (Max. for M.A. 3; Max. 6). Involves independent study and research experience in given topic, person, movement in literature. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level literature courses, consent of instructor, and permission of department chair.

4630. English Honors Thesis. 1-3 (Max. 3). Directed study under the supervision of an English honors thesis chairperson. Results in production of an English honors thesis. Maximum of three credits of ENGL 4630 can be applied to the degree. Prerequisite: consent of the Director of the English Honors Program, instructor and department chair.

4640. Studies in Emerging Fields and Approaches. 3 (Max. 12). Presents from semester to semester a variety of significant topics in emerging fields or approaches to literature written in English. Prerequisite: six hours of 2000 level literature courses.

4780. History of the English Language. 3. Considers major sources of change in the English language historically, as well as some of the internal and external catalysts for the process. Prerequisite: ENGL 4750 or consent of instructor.

4785. Linguistics, Language Teaching and Social Context. 3. Introduces prospective teachers of English as second language to the basic components of language and to the social aspects of human language use. Explores a variety of concepts about language: how it is used and perceived, how languages change, how diverse cultures respond to such changes. Cross listed with LANG 4785. Prerequisite: WB/COM2.

4830. Victorian Women's Lives: Their Art, Literature, and Culture. 3. [CA<>{none}] An interdisciplinary approach to the study of women's issues in art, using literary, cultural, and sociological texts to enlarge the art historical basis. Topics include "domestic goddess," class issues, racial questions, working women, prostitution, education, marriage, and divorce. Dual listed with ENGL 5830; cross listed with ART/WMST 4830. Prerequisite: ART 2020, WMST/ENGL 1080. 

4970. Writing Internship. 3 (Max. 6). Students work 6-8 hours per week as "writing interns" for a private business or public agency, performing specific writing/editing tasks for that client. Students are supported and enabled through a series of classroom sessions and individual meetings with the course instructor. Formal progress reports and a comprehensive final report are required. Prerequisite: successful completion of ENGL 4010, 4020, or 4050.

4990. Senior Seminar in English Studies. 3. [WC<>COM3] Considers methods, theories, and history of the study of literature and writing. In readings, discussion, as well as oral and written presentations, students seek a broad perspective on knowledge and skills gained throughout study in the English major. Prerequisite: advanced (senior) standing in English.

4999. Senior Seminar. 3. [{none}<>COM3] This course is the capstone course in the English major. Subject matter varies by section. In all sections students will exercise skills acquired in the major (close-reading, historical analysis, application of theory) to explore significant texts and to reflect on the nature of English study today. Prerequisites: COM1; COM2; ENGL 3000; senior standing.

JumpLink5000. Studies In:. 1 - 8 (Max. 8). Provides an opportunity for specialized seminar approaches to subjects in literature. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5010. Rhetoric and Composition: History, Theory, Practice. 1 - 4 (Max. 4). Prepares graduate students to teach college composition and rhetoric at UW and beyond, with attention to the intellectual traditions that inform our writing program’s pedagogy. It examines the theories that support informed writing instruction and offers classroom strategies that may be applied to any course in English studies. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5020. Public-Facing English Studies. 1-4 (Max. 8). Introduction to the history and theory of public intellectualism and English studies. Students develop theoretical and practical knowledge and explore alternative applications for academic research for publics beyond the classroom. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5050. Writing in Public Genres. 1-4 (Max. 8). Intensive introduction to public-facing writing in English subject areas, including articles, book reviews, think pieces, TED talks, podcasts, and other genres of commentary associated with public intellectual work in English studies. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5061. Rhetorical Theory and Criticism. 3. An investigation into how rhetorical theory, spanning from its ancient roots in Aristotelian thinking to its current postmodern components, operates in society. Explores how various critical methods can be utilized to gain a stronger understanding of public communication texts, including newspapers, speeches, music, and film. Cross listed with COJO 5061; dual listed with ENGL 4061. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 3000-4000 level work.

5070. Qualitative Methods in English. 1-4 (Max. 8). Advanced introduction to qualitative research methods in English and Rhetoric. Students will survey different types of qualitative methods and will learn to evaluate qualitative projects. Includes an emphasis on working with human participants and on ethics. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5075. Non-Profit Writing and Grants. 1-4 (Max. 8). Non-profit writing from a rhetorical perspective. Students analyze different kinds of non-profit communication, including fundraising, mission development, social media. Participate in grant proposal development or other organizational communication activity. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5080. Graduate Apprenticeship. 1. The graduate apprenticeship furthers a graduate student's professional development by allowing him/her to teach in a course other than Freshman Composition and to engage in a close working relationship with a faculty member. Apprentices will engage in a full range of teaching activities, such as grading, constructing assignments and exams, lecturing, leading discussion, and so on. Does not apply to hour requirement for the degree. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of the English department chair.

5220. Studies in Medieval Literature. 1-4 (Max. 8). A seminar course in selected genres, figures, and themes in Medieval English literature. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours or 4000-level work.

5230. Studies in English Renaissance Literature. 1-4 (Max. 8). A seminar in selected genres, figures, and themes of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5250. Studies in Shakespeare. 1-4 (Max. 8). To provide advanced students with the opportunity to study problems of text, sources, staging, theatrical history, and/or critical theory with reference to the works of William Shakespeare. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5270. Studies in 18c English Literature. 1-4 (Max. 8). A seminar in selected genres, figures, and themes of restoration and eighteenth century English literature. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5280. Studies in 19c English Literature. 1-4 (Max. 4). A seminar in selected genres, figures, and themes of the romantic and Victorian periods. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours or 4000-level work.

5290. Studies in 20c English Literature. 1-4 (Max. 8). A seminar in significant writers of poetry, drama, fiction, and biography from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5310. Early American Literature. 4. Seminar designed to acquaint graduate students with selected texts from the colonial period to 1800, relevant secondary works, and scholarly methods. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 3000-4000 level work.

5320. Studies in 19c American Literature. 1-4 (Max. 8). A seminar designed to acquaint graduate students with selected principal works of American literature, relevant secondary works, and scholarly method. Prerequisite: graduate status of 12 hours or 4000-level work.

5330. Studies in 20c American Literature. 1-4 (Max. 8). A seminar in selected significant writers of poetry, drama, and prose from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5340. Intellectual Currents in Modern American Literature. 1-4 (Max. 4). Devoted to the study of writers such as Marx and Freud and more recent American writers. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours or 4000-level work.

5350. Global Literatures in English. 1-4 (Max. 8). Examines significant texts, authors, cultural and historical contexts, and literary and theoretical movements in postcolonial or global literatures. May involve comparative study or may be focused on a single country context. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5360. Literatures of Diversity. 1-4 (Max. 8). A study of literature and culture of selected minority or marginalized communities. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 3000-4000 level work.

5455. Slavery and Freedom. 1-4 (Max. 8). Students engage in an in-depth study of the literary voices that emerged from the history of enslavement in the Americas from colonial times through the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Dual listed with ENGL 4455; cross listed with AAST 5455. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 3000-4000 level work.

5520. History of Literary Criticism: Enlightenment and 19th Century. 4. Historical survey of the mainstream of European literary criticism, including the critics of antiquity and the Renaissance. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5530. Modern Critical Theory and Practice. 1-4 (Max. 4). Major trends in modern poetics and practical criticism. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5830. Victorian Women's Lives: Their Art, Literature, and Culture. 3. An interdisciplinary approach to the study of women's issues in art, using literary, cultural, and sociological texts to enlarge the art historical basis. Topics include "domestic goddess," class issues, racial questions, working women, prostitution, education, marriage, and divorce. Dual listed with ENGL 4830; cross listed with WMST 5830. Prerequisite: ART 2020, WMST/ENGL 1080.

5880. Studies in Modern Fiction. 4. A study of modern fiction, examining theory and practice, and covering works of English, European, and American origin. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5890. Consumption, Markets, Cultures. 1-4 (Max. 8). An interdisciplinary investigation of the ways in which cultural venues curate and market stories, history, and texts. Analyzes and applies theories and methodologies from literary and cultural tourism studies, as well as marketing and consumer culture, to museums, performances, tourist sites and theme parks. This class will include hands-on field research. Prerequisite: graduate status or 12 hours of 4000-level work.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3 (Max. 4). Work in classroom with a major professor. Expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate status.

5915. Tutorial. 1. Graduate standing or consent of instructor. One credit hour for fee purposes.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5959. Enrichment Studies. 1-3 (Max. 99). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: Credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate degree program.

5965. Thesis Research II. 1-3 (Max. 3). Designed for students who have reached an advanced stage in the writing of the thesis. Also to inform students of professional genres and practices as well as academic and non-academic careers following the MA degree. Prerequisites: ENGL 5960 and enrollment in a graduate degree program.

5975. Independent Studies. 1-4 (Max. 6). Independent study and research experience in a given topic, person, or movement in literature at an advanced level. Prerequisite: permission of chair; graduate standing.

5990. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 24). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

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