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University Catalog

Geography (GEOG)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 2003 USP code followed by the 2015 USP code (i.e. [QB<>Q]).

JumpLink1000 [G&R 1000]. World Regional Geography. 3. [CS,G<>H] Covers the distributions, traits, and processes of the Earth’s peoples and landscapes through the perspective of regional geography, which is the study of the spatial relationships of natural environments and human societies. Equivalent to INST 1060. Credit cannot be earned in both GEOG 1000 and INST 1060.

1010 [G&R 1010]. Introduction to Physical Geography. 4. [SE<>PN] Systematically studies natural aspects of geographic environments, including weather and climate, landforms, soils and vegetation. Lab fee required.

1020 [G&R 1020]. Introduction to Human Geography. 3. [CS,G<>H] Analyzes spatial patterns of and interaction between the world’s great cultural systems. Includes settlement patterns, behavioral patterns, agricultural land use and resource utilization.

1050 [G&R 1050]. Introduction to Environment and Natural Resources. 3. Examines human interaction with environment, ranging from regional to global scales, from perspectives of environmental effects on human life, human effects on environment and approaches to environmental management.

1101. First-Year Seminar. 3. [(none)<>FYS]

JumpLink2150 [G&R 2150]. Foundations of Geo Information Science and Technology. 4. [L<>{none}] Overviews the role of geographic information and technology in modern society. Includes discovery and accessing geospatial data and information for both research and enjoyment, with an emphasis on reading and analyzing maps and visualizations to support geographical reasoning. Lab provides hands-on experience working with maps and related geographic information technologies.

2370. Chicano History: Origins to 1900. 3. [CS,D<>H] General survey that traces the geographic distribution and historical processes that have shaped the life experiences, socio-economic development and cultural contributions of peoples of Mexican descent in the United States from their indigenous and Hispanic origins to the end of the 19th century. Cross listed with CHST/HIST 2370.

2550 [G&R 2550]. Recreation and Natural Resources. 3. Introduces outdoor recreation agencies and programs; supply and demand for outdoor recreation resources; and relationship of recreation to the conservation of natural resources.

JumpLink3010 [G&R 3010]. Geomorphology of Earth’s Dynamic Landscapes. 3. A Systematic exploration of Earth’s surface, emphasizing the geographic distribution of various landforms and their evolution over time. Introduces general geomorphic principles and describes the application of these principles to specific landscape features. The processes that drive landscape change are examined through case studies, computer-based mapping exercises, and basic calculations. Prerequisites: One of the following: MATH 1050, 2200, 2205, STAT2050, 2070 and either GEOG 1010 or GEOL 1500.

3030 [G&R 3030]. Geography and Development. 3. [CS,G<>{none}] Examines distribution of wealth and poverty in the world; theories of development, from traditional modernization theories through Marxist critiques and sustainable development; and case studies from around the world of development successes and failures, chosen to illustrate and illuminate theories of development. Prerequisite: GEOG 1000 or 1020 or 9 credit hours of social science with global focus.

3050 [G&R 3050]. Economic Geography. 3. Economic Geography is the study of the location, distribution and spatial organization of economic actvities across the globe; specifically how the economic realm is intertwined with other spheres of international social life. It explores the inherent logics and mechanisms of the capitalist system, and the social and spatial inequalities that result. Prerequisite: 6 hours of Social Sciences or International Studies.

3150. Survey of Remote Sensing Applications. 3. Provides an introduction to remote sensing with a survey of applications in different fields. It include a brief introduction to fundamental of remote sensing and surveys applications of aerial photography, multi-and hyperspectral, active and thermal remote sensing, and global change remote sensing. Cross listed with BOT 3150. Prerequisites: completion of a USP QA course and one science course with laboratory.

3280. Spatial Methods. 4. [{none}<>COM3] Introduction of statistical methods for the analysis of geo-spatial data; point, line/network, and areal units. The application of quantitative measurements to examining the spatial relationship of physical and socio-economic factors in problem-solving. Prerequisites: at least one geography course and completion of either STAT 2010, 2050, or 2070.

3400. Traditional Ecological Knowledge. 3. [CS,D<>{none}] Description of the interaction between economy, religion, language and the ecosystem for select indigenous peoples and discussion of the pedagogical methods for preserving their ecological knowledge. An examination of the conflict between contemporary society’s demands and preserving traditional society’s heritage. Cross listed with AIST 3400. Prerequisite: one course in American Indian culture.

3450 [G&R 3450]. Weather and Climate. 3. Systematically examines elements and controls of weather and climate with application to regions. Cross listed with ENR 3450. Prerequisite: GEOG 1000, 1010 or 1020.

3480 [G&R 3480]. Environmental Change. 3. [WB,G<>{none}] Examines changes in the bio-physical environments and landscapes of Earth during its habitation by humans. Emphasizes integrated approaches to understanding environmental changes based on climatological, ecological, geological, archeological, and historical evidence. Explores how humans have modified Earth’s environments and how societies have responded to natural and anthropogenic environmental change. Cross listed with ESS 3480. Prerequisites: GEOG 1010 or any USP S, SB, SE or SP/PN course; any WA/COM1 course.

3550 [G&R 3550]. Natural Hazards and Society. 3. [CS<>{none}] Considers societal structures and processes as they interact with hazards in the natural environment.

JumpLink4000 [G&R 4000]. Terrain Analysis. 3. Studies techniques for acquiring and analyzing spatial data from maps, remotely sensed imagery and field surveys for landscape assessment. Emphasizes deriving maps that describe physical suitability of landscapes for specific human activities. Field trip required. Prerequisites: GEOG 2150 and junior standing.

4013. Political Geography. 3. Geographic space is subdivided into political units to aid human interaction and to facilitate political processes. Examines the spatial organization of political space and its effects upon political processes at varying geographic scales ranging from the local to international. Dual listed with GEOG 5013; cross listed with POLS 4013. Prerequisite: GEOG 1000 or 1020, or 9 hours of social science.

4020 [4420]. Geography and Tourism. 3. Studies concepts, methods, conflicts and opportunities of national and international tourism. Emphasizes recreation and the environment. Prerequisites: GEOG 1000.

4040 [G&R 4040]. Conservation of Natural Resources. 3. [CS<>{none}] Geographically analyzes conservation of natural and human resources, as well as political, social and ethical ramifications of our environmental policy. Cross listed with ENR 4040. Prerequisite: 6 hours of geography or ENR.

4051 [G&R 4051]. Environmental Politics. 3. [WC<>{none}] Analyzes environmentalism as a political phenomenon. Provides students with a basic understanding of how to analyze political issues by: (1) examining the historical and contemporary issues that produce controversy over environmental matters; and (2) surveying the impacts of these issues on the formulation and implementation of laws, policies, and regulations. Cross listed with AMST, ENR, POLS and REWM 4051. Prerequisite: POLS 1000.

4052 [G&R 4052]. Federal Land Politics. 3. Examines the political forces that have shaped and continue to shape federal land policy and management. Explores the interactions between democratic decision making and science in the management of federal lands. Surveys the sources of controversy over federal land management and methods for harmonizing public demands with technical expertise. Cross listed with POLS/ENR/AMST/REWM 4052. Prerequisite: POLS 1000.

4080 [G&R 4080]. Management of Major River Basins. 3. Examines geography of water resources, including distribution, water as a resource and water as a hazard to humans. Focuses on water management case studies on the scale of major river basins in North America and elsewhere in the world. Prerequisites: GEOG 4040 and junior standing. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4111. Remote Sensing of the Environment. 4. Combined lecture and laboratory course introduces students to the fundamentals of remote sensing with a strong emphasis on vegetation, land cover and environmental applications. Students learn to use digital spectral data to distinguish characteristics of the terrestrial biosphere important for ecological and land management applications. Dual listed with GEOG 5111; cross listed with BOT 4111. Prerequisites: QA and one science course with lab.

4113. Geological Remote Sensing. 4. Acquaints students with aircraft and spacecraft remote sensing of the environment, emphasizing geologic application to earth and other planetary bodies. Includes visible, infrared, ultraviolet, radio and radar sensing. Laboratory exercises are applications related to tectonics, geomorphology, paleoclimate, structure, stratigraphy, environmental geology and geologic hazards. Dual listed with GEOG 5113; cross listed with GEOL 4113. Prerequisites: GEOL 1005 or 1100 or 1200 or GEOG 1010 and MATH 1400/1405 or MATH 1450.

4200 [G&R 4200]. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. 4. Fundamental concepts, theories and applications in geographic information systems and science. Prerequisite: GEOG 2150.

4210 [G&R 4210]. Advanced Geographic Information Systems. 4. Advanced study of programs, data structures, and techniques for spatial data display and analysis. Dual listed with GEOG 5210. Prerequisite: GEOG 4200.

4211. Advanced Remote Sensing of the Environment. 4. Includes lecture and laboratory. Specific topics include a review of remote sensing fundamentals and methods for using high spatial resolution data, hyperspectral data, active remote sensing, advanced image processing, advanced classification techniques and statistical techniques specific to exploring remotely sensed data. Cross listed with BOT 4211; dual listed with GEOG 5211. Prerequisite: BOT/GEOG/GEOL 4111.

4220. Spatial Modeling and Geocomputation. 4. Examines the theory and development of models of spatial patterns and process. Modeling these systems often required techniques not readily available in a GIS environment. Examines GIS and geocomputational methods to solve these problems as well as issues related to error, representation, and scale. Dual listed with GEOG 5220. Prerequisite: GEOG 4200/4210.

4310 [G&R 4310]. Foundations of Sustainable Planning. 3. Description and analysis of planning that involves a citizen involvement process to determine the future direction of a community or region. Sustainability concepts are described to provide a framework for social equity, environmental protection, and economic longevity, the fundamental elements of a community or regional comprehensive plan. Dual listed with GEOG 5310. Prerequisite: junior standing.

4325 [G&R 4325]. Legal Aspects of Planning. 3. Review of the U.S. Constitution, federal and state laws and statues, and pertinent court cases that directly relate to planning policy at the federal, state and local level. Examination of the legal system to provide services and protect the health, safety, and welfare of citizens with regard to private property rights. Dual listed with GEOG 5325. Prerequisite: junior standing, USP V course.

4330 [G&R 4330]. Land Use Planning. 3. Advanced study of processes expressed as a specific activity on the land. An examination and analysis of the interacting environmental, economic, and social factors that produce the land activity. Dual listed with GEOG 5330.

4340 [G&R 4340]. Natural Resource Management on Western Reservations. 3. Designed to examine natural resource management techniques on western reservations. Topics to be discussed will focus on the management and planning of water, grazing, extractive industries and forestry. Field work on the Wind River Indian Reservation is a part of the class. Cross listed with AIST 4340. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 2000-level AIST classes.

4370 [G&R 4370]. Environmental Planning. 3. A planning-oriented approach to ecosystems theory based on the federal/legal regulatory foundation. An examination of scientific and alternative perspectives on the comparative dynamics of natural and human-oriented ecosystems and implementing strategies. Dual listed with GEOG 5370.

4390 [G&R 4390]. Rural & Small Town Planning. 3.  A single community planning problem is assigned. Student teams play the role of community planning staff. Teams experience defining community goals; communicating with others about these goals and problem perceptions; accomplishing necessary research; generating various solutions to problems they have perceived; selected from among these solutions, and formulating a single, integrated, comprehensive plan and documenting the plan and rationale behind it. Dual listed with GEOG 5390. Prerequisite: work at the 4000-level in one or more of the four substantive areas, and/or consent of the instructor.

4400 [G&R 4400]. Natural Resource Policy. 3. Encompasses administrative policies and programs relating to natural areas. Emphasizes the national park system. Prerequisite: GEOG 4750.

4440. Advanced Global Climate Variability. 3 (Max. 9). Climate varies. This fundamental aspect of the climate system can have major environmental and societal impacts to ecosystems, the hydrologic cycle and water resource management in arid environments such as the intermountain west. This course will utilize climate data and mapping tools to understand global and regional climate variability. Dual listed with GEOG 5440. Prerequisite: GEOG/ENR 3450 or instructor’s consent.

4450 [G&R 4450]. Fluvial Geomorphology. 4. A systematic examination of rivers and related land forms. Emphasizes understanding how processes of flow and sediment transport influence channel form and behavior. Considers rivers systems across a range of scales, from movement of individual sediment particles to organization of continental drainage basins. Explores connections to aquatic ecosystems and human impacts. Dual listed with GEOG 5450. Prerequisite: GEOG 3010 or GEOL 2100 or 2150.

4455. Remote Sensing of Hydrologic Systems. 4. Explores the application of remote sensing data and techniques to the study of the hydrological systems and introduces the physical principles that enable the different elements of the hydrological system to be inferred from different types of image data and analysis. Dual listed with GEOG 5455. Prerequisites: junior standing and one prior course in remote sensing.

4460 [G&R 4460, 3460]. Biogeography. 3. A systematic study of the distribution of plants and animals, communities and ecosystems, the processes that produce patterns of distribution and their change over time. Interactions of climate, soil geomorphology, biota and human activities are emphasized. Prerequisites: junior standing and GEOG 1010 or LIFE 2022 or 2023.

4470 [G&R 4470]. Fire Ecology. 3. Natural and human-caused fires are an important phenomenon affecting ecosystems and human communities throughout the world. Explores the geography, ecology, and management of fires. Dual listed with GEOG 5470. Prerequisite: GEOG 4460, BOT 4700, LIFE 3400 or graduate standing.

4500 [G&R 4500]. The American Landscape. 3. Provides a basis for interpreting the nature and content of the contemporary landscapes of the United States by viewing those landscapes in the process of creation and change and investigates the relationship between landscape and American environmental attitudes. Students are introduced to research techniques and methodologies in historical geography. Prerequisite: GEOG 1010 or 1020, or 6 hours in social science.

4502. Images of Wyoming and the West. 3. The West is nothing more than a barren, desolate landscape to some while to others it offers great spiritual and cultural significance. Examines how individuals and groups perceive Wyoming and the West, how such perceptions have been constructed over time, and how these differing views create images of the region both real and imagined. Dual listed with GEOG 5502. Prerequisites: GEOG 1000 or GEOG 1020 and junior standing.

4550. Geography of Wine. 3. Examine the regional influence of climate, terrain and cultural characteristics on the production of grape varieties and demonstrate the implications of this influence on the location and distribution of wines produced. Discussion will focus on the world-wide production and consumption of wine and impacts of multi-national corporations. Prerequisites: junior standing and at least 21 years of age.

4560. Global Cities. 3. Globalization accelerates urbanization processes and creates a new type of city, the global city. This course introduces debates over global cities, urban culture, new urban landscapes, urban planning practices, and social disparity. It uses case studies on the cities around the world to explore the diversity of global city formation processes. Dual Listed with GEOG 5560; cross listed with INST 4560. Prerequisite: 9 hours of international studies or geography.

4570. Cultural Geography. 3. Cultural Geography is an overview in qualitative cultural landscape studies.  The course emphasizes what a cultural landscape is, how it can be examined, and what can be learned from such landscapes. Students are exposed to readings in cultural geography from a wide array of viewpoints with an emphasis placed on classic works. Dual listed with GEOG 5570. Prerequisites: GEOG 1000 or GEOG 1020 and junior standing.

4580 [4572]. Sense of Place. 3. Examines how individuals and groups perceive specific geographic locations, how such perceptions are constructed, and how these differing views and feelings play out in our everyday. Dual listed with GEOG 5580. Prerequisite: GEOG 1000 or GEOG 1020.

4590 [4574]. Geography of Conflicts. 3. Explores the representation of place and how various groups often have differing views of how a place should be represented and/or thought of. Various local representations of contested land use, group place identity, and personal place identity are discussed. Dual listed with GEOG 5590. Prerequisites: GEOG 1000 or GEOG 1020 and junior standing.

4750 [G&R 4750, 4700]. Public Land Management. 3. Teaches management of the federal and public lands of the United States. Includes consideration of management issues, agencies and organizations, and management approaches for public lands and associated natural resources. Dual listed with GEOG 5750. Prerequisite: 6 hours of geography or ENR.

4875 [G&R 4875, 4950]. Independent Studies. 1‑6 (Max. 6). Considers current research topics in consultation with faculty member. Dual listed with GEOG 5875. Prerequisite: 9 hours in subject area of topic of current research.

4880 [G&R 4880, 4850]. Current Topics. 1‑6 (Max. 9). Special course on a topic of current interest. Dual listed with GEOG 5880. Prerequisite: junior standing.

4885 [G&R 4885, 4900]. Seminar: _______. 1‑3 (Max. 6). Faculty-student discussion, reading, and study focused on a selected topic and interest. Dual listed with GEOG 5885. Prerequisite: GEOG 4750.

4960 [4860, G&R 4860]. Field Studies. 1-6 (Max. 6). Intensive introduction to field methods used in geographic research in one or more of the subdivisions of geography.

4965 [4865, G&R 4865]. Directed Studies/Research Problems. 1-6 (Max 6). Intensive introduction to methods used in geographic research. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and at least 12 hours in geography.

4990 [4870, G&R 4990]. Internship/Practicum. 1‑6 (Max. 12). Experience in applying student skills and training in an agency, organization, or business. Offered for S/U only. Dual listed with GEOG 5990. Prerequisites: for majors only, minimum of 12 hours in the major, junior standing and consent of the instructor.

JumpLink5000. Research Perspectives. 3. Focuses upon the historical development, heritage and topical breadth of geography. Special emphasis is given to the changing approaches and philosophies for conducting research in geography. Prerequisite: graduate student admitted to our program, or, any other student with 15 hours of geography courses.

5001. Research in Geography Colloquium. 2. Colloquium series and discussion to review and critique examples of current research in geography and allied disciplines. This course builds on the theoretical and philosophical foundations from Research Perspectives. Prerequisite: GEOG 5000.

5002. Geography Graduate Seminar. 2. Research seminar providing third-semester graduate students a public and formal opportunity to present their research. Prerequisite: GEOG 5001.

5013. Political Geography. 3. Geographic space is subdivided into political units to aid human interaction and to facilitate political processes. Examines the spatial organization of political space and its effects upon political processes at varying geographic scales ranging from the local to international. Cross listed with POLS 5013 and dual listed with GEOG 4013. Prerequisite: GEOG 1000 or 1020, or 9 hours of social science.

5050. Techniques in Environmental Data Management. 4. Centers on the role of information technology in support of scientific research. Through integration of multiple software packages (e.g. Relational databases, ProgramR and ArcGIS), proven database designs, and SQL scripting,  increased efficiency and utility will occur during data analyses. These information science principles are demonstrated using project-based examples. Cross listed with ECOL/ENR 5050. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5060. Landscape Ecology. 3. A study of structure, function, and change in the biosphere on the scale of kilometers. Includes a consideration of the effects of human land uses, natural disturbances, and other processes on landscapes. Prerequisite: GEOG 4460 or LIFE 3400 or BOT 4700.

5111. Remote Sensing of the Environment. 4. Combined lecture and laboratory course introduces students to the fundamentals of remote sensing with a strong emphasis on vegetation, land cover and environmental applications. Students learn to use digital spectral data to distinguish characteristics of the terrestrial biosphere important for ecological and land management applications. Dual listed with GEOG 4111; cross listed with BOT 5111. Prerequisites: QA and one science course with lab.

5113. Geological Remote Sensing. 4. Acquaints students with aircraft and spacecraft remote sensing of the environment, emphasizing geologic application to earth and other planetary bodies. Includes visible, infrared, ultraviolet, radio and radar sensing. The laboratory exercises are applications related to tectonics, geomorphology, paleoclimate, structure, statigraphy, environmental geology and geologic hazards. Dual listed with GEOG 4113; cross listed with GEOL 5113. Prerequisites: GEOL 1005 or 1100 or 1200 or GEOG 1010 and MATH 1400/1405 or MATH 1450.

5210. Advanced Geographic Information Systems. 4. Advanced study of programs, data structures, and techniques for spatial data display and analysis. Dual listed with GEOG 4210. Prerequisites: GEOG 4200.

5211. Advanced Remote Sensing of the Environment. 4. Includes lecture and laboratory. Specific topics include a review of remote sensing fundamentals and methods for using high spatial resolution data, hyperspectral data, active remote sensing, advanced image processing, advanced classification techniques and statistical techniques specific to exploring remotely sensed data. Dual listed with GEOG 4211; cross listed with BOT 5211. Prerequisite: BOT/GEOG/GEOL 4111/5111.

5220. Spatial Modeling and Geocomputation. 4. Examines the theory and development of models of spatial patterns and process. Modeling these systems often requires techniques not readily available in GIS environment. Examines GIS and geocomputational methods to solve these problems as well as issues related to error, representation, and scale. Dual listed with GEOG 4220. Prerequisite: GEOG 4200/4210.

5310. Foundations of Sustainable Planning. 3. Description and analysis of planning that involves a citizen involvement process to determine the future direction of a community or region. Sustainability concepts are described to provide a framework for social equity, environmental protection, and economic longevity, the fundamental elements of a community or regional comprehensive plan. Dual listed with GEOG 4310.

5325. Legal Aspects of Planning. 3. Review of the U.S. Constitution, federal and state laws and statues, and pertinent court cases that directly relate to planning policy at the federal, state and local level. Examination of the legal system to provide services and protect the health, safety, and welfare of citizens with regard to private property rights. Dual listed with GEOG 4325. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5330. Land Use Planning. 3. Advanced study of processes expressed as a specific activity on the land. An examination and analysis of the interacting environmental, economic, and social factors that produce the land activity. Dual listed with GEOG 4330. Prerequisite: graduate standing in GEOG.

5370. Environmental Planning. 3. A planning-oriented approach to ecosystems theory based on the federal/legal regulatory foundation. An examination of scientific and alternative perspectives on the comparative dynamics of natural and human-oriented ecosystems and implementing strategies. Dual listed with GEOG 4370. Prerequisite: GEOG 4330/5330.

5390. Rural and Small Town Planning. 3. A single community planning problem is assigned. Student teams play the role of community planning staff. Teams experience defining community goals; communicating with others about these goals and problem perceptions; accomplishing necessary research; perceived; selecting from among these solutions, and formulating a single, integrated, comprehensive plan, and documenting the plan and rationale behind it. Dual listed with GEOG 4390. Prerequisite: work at the 4000-level in one or more of the four substantive areas, and/or consent of the instructor.

5440. Advanced Global Climate Variability. 3 (Max. 9). Climate varies. This fundamental aspect of the climate system can have major environmental and societal impacts to ecosystems, the hydrologic cycle and water resource management in arid environments such as the intermountain west. This course will utilize climate data and mapping tools to understand global and regional climate variability. Dual listed with GEOG 4440.

5450. Fluvial Geomorphology. 4. A systematic examination of rivers and related land forms. Emphasizes understanding how processes of flow and sediment transport influence channel form and behavior. Considers rivers systems across a range of scales, from movement of individual sediment particles to organization of continental drainage basins. Explores connections to aquatic ecosystems and human impacts. Dual listed with GEOG 4450.

5455. Remote Sensing of Hydrologic Systems. 4. Explores the application of remote sensing data and techniques to the study of the hydrological systems and introduces the physical principles that enable the different elements of the hydrological system to be inferred from different types of image data and analysis. Dual listed with GEOG 4455.

5470. Fire Ecology. 3. Natural and human-caused fires are an important phenomenon affecting ecosystems and human communities throughout the world. Explores the geography, ecology, and management of fires. Dual listed with GEOG 4470. Prerequisite: GEOG 4460, BOT 4700, LIFE 3400 or graduate standing.

5502. Images of Wyoming and the West. 3. The West is nothing more than a barren, desolate landscape to some while to others it offers great spiritual and cultural significance. Examines how individuals and groups perceive Wyoming and the West, how such perceptions have been constructed over time, and how these differing views create images of the region both real and imagined. Dual listed with GEOG 4502. Prerequisite: GEOG 1000 or GEOG 1020 and junior standing.

5560. Global Cities. 3. Globalization accelerates urbanization processes and creates a new type of city, the global city. This course introduces debates over global cities, urban culture, new urban landscapes, urban planning practices, and social disparity. It uses case studies on the cities around the world to explore the diversity of global city formation processes. Dual Listed with GEOG 4560; cross listed with INST 5560. Prerequisites: 9 hours of international studies or geography.

5570. Cultural Geography. 3. Cultural Geography is an overview in qualitative cultural landscape studies.  The course emphasizes what a cultural landscape is, how it can be examined, and what can be learned from such landscapes. Students are exposed to readings in cultural geography from a wide array of viewpoints with an emphasis placed on classic works. Dual listed with GEOG 4570. Prerequisite: GEOG 1000 or GEOG 1020 and junior standing.

5580 [5572]. Sense of Place. 3. Examines how individuals and groups perceive specific geographic locations, how such perceptions are constructed, and how these differing views and feelings play out in our everyday. Dual listed with GEOG 4580. Prerequisites: GEOG 1000 or GEOG 1020.

5590 [5574]. Geography of Conflicts. 3. Explores the representation of place and how various groups often have differing views of how a place should be represented and/or thought of. Various local representations of contested land use, group place identity, and personal place identity are discussed. Dual listed with GEOG 4590. Prerequisite: GEOG 1000 or GEOG 1020 and junior standing.

5750. Public Land Management. 3. Management of the federal and public lands of the United States. Includes consideration of management issues, agencies and organization, and management approaches for public lands and associated natural resources. Dual listed with GEOG 4750. Prerequisite: 6 hours in geography or ENR.

5790. Research Methods. 1-3 (Max. 9). Introduction to the methodology of empirical research in related fields for advanced students. Prerequisites: 12 hours in the major and consent of instructor.

5870. Internship/Practicum. 1-12 (Max. 12). Experience in applying student skills and training in an agency, organization, or business. Dual listed with GEOG 4870. Prerequisite: for majors only.

5875. Independent Study. 1-6 (Max. 6). Considers current research topics in consultation with faculty member. Dual listed with GEOG 4875. Prerequisite: 9 hours in subject area of topic of current research.

5885. Seminar. 1-3 (Max. 6). Faculty-student discussion, reading, and study focused on a selected topic of interest. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3 (Max. 3). Work in classroom with a major professor. Expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5959. Enrichment Studies. 1-3 (Max. 99). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: Credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Graduate level course designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisites: enrollment in a graduate degree program.

5990. Internship/Practicum. 1-12 (Max. 12). Experience in applying student skills and training in an agency, organization, or business. Offered for S/U only. Dual listed with GEOG 4990. Prerequisite: graduate standing.


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