Some of the content on this website requires JavaScript to be enabled in your web browser to function as intended. While the website is still usable without JavaScript, it should be enabled to enjoy the full interactive experience.

Skip to Main Content

University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Geology and Geophysics (GEOL)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

1001. Earth Science and Society. 1. [F1, S3<>I, L] Introduces students to the study of Earth Science and its role in society through examination and discussion of current events, and through projects researching geologic topics of societal interest. Prerequisite: GEOL 1100 or concurrent enrollment.

1005. Earth History. 4. [(none)<>S] Reviews the evolution of the Earth including: the creation of the Universe, formation of a layered earth, development and history of continents, controls on climate change, and the origin and evolution of life. Class introduces basic geologic, chemical, physical and biologic concepts used to decipher Earth history. Prerequisites: none.

1070. The Earth: Its Physical Environment. 4. [S3<>SE] Discusses selected topics from geology, astronomy and meteorology illustrating fundamental concepts, processes, products and the interrelationships among them. Emphasizes nature of science and relationship between selected topics and society. Cross listed with ASTR 1070. Prerequisites: Math level 3 or equivalent courses, consent of instructor, elementary education major and EDCI 1450 must be taken concurrently.

1100. Physical Geology. 4. [S3<>SE] Studies modern concepts of the Earth's physical makeup including minerals and rocks, topography, crustal structure, plate tectonics and processes and forces acting on and within the earth. (Normally offered fall, spring and summer)

1200. Historical Geology. 4. [S3<>SE] Describes methods used for historical reconstruction, outlines the sequence of life recorded by the fossil record, and summarizes the physical evolution of North America.

1500. Water, Dirt, and Earth's Environment. 4. [(none)<>SE] Introductory environmental geology course focusing on water and soil both as hazards and as life-sustaining resources. Explores surface processes and climate change over geological and human timescales. Case studies illustrate the environmental tradeoffs of resource use. Cross listed with ENR 1500. Prerequisites: none.

1600. Global Sustainability: Managing Earth's Resources. 4. [(none)<>G, S] Uses biology, chemistry, physics and Earth science to examine Global Sustainability and how this worldview might guide our future management of Earth resources. Case studies in different international settings place questions of resource exploitation (discovery, extraction, processing, use and disposal) and sustainability in a larger global context. Prerequisites: none.

2000. Geochemical Cycles and the Earth System. 4. [S3<>SE] Introduces the Earth system, including the solid Earth, hydrosphere, biosphere and atmosphere. Emphasizes the evolution of the Earth, rock associations and geochemical cycles. Cross listed with ESS 2000. Prerequisites: a 1000-level GEOL course with a lab and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 1020. (Normally offered fall semester)

2005. Introduction to Geophysics. 4. Mechanisms and driving forces of Earth deformation, at length-scales from the tectonic to the microstructural. Introduces solid bodies, including stress and strain, rheologies and cracking, with applications to plate tectonics, deformation of rocks and surficial processes. Fluid and heat flow is introduced, with applications to tectonic and hydrologic problems. Prerequisites: 1000-level GEOL course with lab, MATH 1450 or higher. (Normally offered spring semester)

2010. Mineralogy. 3. Introduction to rock-forming minerals. Includes introduction to crystallography, crystal chemistry, and the occurrence and identification of the common minerals, with emphasis on silicates. Field trip required. Prerequisites: GEOL 1005, 1100, or 1200; CHEM 1020 or concurrent enrollment.

2020. Introduction to Petrology. 2. Introduces the study of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks in hand specimen. Covers textural and mineralogic classification of rocks and the tectonic environments in which they occur. Field trip required. Prerequisite: GEOL 2010.

2050. Principles of Paleontology. 3. [S3<>(none)] Examines scientific principles, biological and geological, that underlie general study of ancient life on Earth. Includes interactions of evolutionary, stratigraphic, taphonomic and paleogeographic concepts within various approaches to paleobiology and systematic paleontology. Optional field trip. Prerequisite: GEOL 1100 or LIFE 1000 or 1010. (Normally offered spring semester)

2070. Introduction to Oceanography. 4. [S3, G1<>(none)] Survey of ocean processes, including the major subdisciplines of physical, geological, chemical, and biological oceanography. Studies the form of the world ocean; composition and chemistry of seawater; circulation, currents, waves and tides; nutrients and organisms; estuaries and coastal processes; origin and distribution of deep-sea sediments; and impacts of human activities. Prerequisites: GEOL 1005, 1100, 1200, 1500 or ENR 1500; MATH 1405 or 1450.

2080. General Field Geology. 3. [S3<>SE] Covers basic concepts of geology and field techniques emphasizing interpretation of geologic features in the field. Weekly field trip required. Identical to GEOL 3080. Credit not allowed if completed GEOL 4717. Prerequisites: GEOL 1100, 1200, 1005 or 1500. (Normally offered the first half of the fall semester)

2100. Stratigraphy and Sedimentation. 4. Introduces principles of stratigraphy, materials and processes of sedimentation. Laboratory includes study and interpretation of sedimentary rocks, sedimentary structures and stratigraphic techniques. Field trip required. Prerequisite: GEOL 1100. (Normally offered fall semester)

2150. Geomorphology. 4. Discusses general principles of landform description and analysis. Prerequisite: GEOL 1100 or equivalent.

3110. Invertebrate Paleontology. 4. Encompasses taxonomy and morphology of major groups of invertebrate fossils. Includes examples of their use in correlation, environmental reconstruction and interpretation of evolution. Prerequisite: GEOL 1200. (Normally offered spring semester)

3400. Geologic Hazards: A Historical and Scientific Review. 4. [S3<>SE] Geologic hazards include well-known catastrophic events such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and landslides, as well as lesser known processes such as soil expansion, land subsidence and ground failure. Economically, the latter processes have a much greater impact each year than the more notorious geologic events. Reviews geologic hazards from a historical and scientific perspective. Describes relevant geologic processes, how geologic evidence is used to identify regions at risk, monitoring procedures and the role of the scientist in predicting catastrophic geologic events. Prehistoric and historic events are used to illustrate temporal and spatial scales of geologic hazards. Prerequisite: junior standing.

3500. Global Change: A Geological Perspective. 4. [S3<>(none)] Considers the geochemical and geophysical systems that control the Earth's climate, the geological and historical record of climate change, and then discusses the possible effect that human activities will have upon these chemical and geophysical systems. Prerequisites: junior standing and an introductory class in the physical sciences.

3600. Earth and Mineral Resources. 4. [(none)<>SE, G] Explores the geologic formation, production, and use of Earth and mineral resources, including building materials, chemical minerals, industrial minerals and metals. For each resource, the geologic environment and processes of formation are discussed. Exploration and mining techniques for each resources are also reviewed and associated environmental problems and regulations examined. Beneficial and detrimental aspects of the use of each resource are also discussed. Prerequisite: completion of USP QA and L.

3650. Energy: A Geological Perspective. 4. [(none)<>SE, G] Examines the energy needs of a modern industrialized society. Looks at the types of energy, the natural laws that govern its use, transformation, and conservation. The different sources of energy available to modern societies are examined. Examination includes fossil fuels, nuclear power as well as alternative energy sources. The formation of the resource is discussed, how it is extracted, and any environmental consequences associated with its extraction and use. Prerequisite: completion of USP QA and L.

4000. Paleomagnetism in Geology/Geophysics. 3. Studies paleomagnetic solutions in geoscience topics. Includes plate reconstructions; sea-floor formation; structural geology; dating of structural/tectonic events; western North American tectonics; global geomagnetic polarity reversals and time scale; magnetostratigraphic correlation; stratigraphic dating; dating diagenetic events; characteristics of core and mantle; extraterrestrial impacts and geologic phenomena; environmental and climate change applications. Field trip and laboratory project required. Dual listed with GEOL 5000. Prerequisite: GEOL 1000 or 1100; GEOL 1200 desirable.

4001. Modeling the Earth System. 4. Takes a modeling approach to demonstrate how the Earth is integrated into an interconnected system through exchanges of energy and matter, and how Earth system functioning is susceptible to human alteration. Unifying concepts focus on quantitative interactions between the Earth and the Sun, and between the Earth's lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and atmosphere. Cross listed with BOT/ATSC/ESS 4001. Prerequisites: MATH 2205 or equivalent and [ESS 2000 or GEOL 2000].

4025. Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology. 4. An advanced study of igneous and metamorphic rocks in hand sample and thin section. Covers optical techniques for identifying minerals, the use of phase diagrams and geochemistry to understand the evolution of igneous rocks and the formation conditions of metamorphic rocks. A field trip is required. Prerequisite: GEOL 2020.

4030. Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport Modeling. 3. Movement of groundwater and the dissolved solute is responsible for a variety of environmental, engineering, and geological processes of interest. Presents an overview of the analyses of groundwater flow and solute transport using numerical modeling. The principles of the Finite Difference Method are introduced. Dual listed with GEOL 5030. Prerequisites: MATH 2205, GEOL 5444.

4050. Geology of Wyoming. 3. Survey of the geologic history of Wyoming beginning in the Precambrian and extending to the present. Stratigraphic and sedimentation history, igneous activity, metamorphism, and orogenic activity are emphasized in the lectures. Occasional field trips are required. Prerequisite: GEOL 1100 or an equivalent course. (Normally offered fall semester)

4060. Rocky Mountain Field Trip. 1 (Max. 3). A six-day geological field trip to various classic localities in the Rocky Mountains. Prerequisites: senior standing and GEOL 2010 and GEOL 4610 or 4050.

4113. Geological Remote Sensing. 4. Acquaints students with aircraft and spacecraft remote sensing of the environment, emphasizing geologic application to earth and other planetary bodies. Includes visible, infrared, ultraviolet, radio and radar sensing. Laboratory exercises are applications related to tectonics, geomorphology, paleoclimate, structure, stratigraphy, environmental geology and geologic hazards. Dual listed with GEOL 5113; cross listed with GEOG 4113. Prerequisites: GEOL 1005 or 1100 or 1200 or GEOG 1010 and MATH 1400/1405 or MATH 1450.

4125. Igneous Petrology. 2. Studies igneous rocks in thin section. Lectures cover mineralogy, geochemistry, phase equilibria and occurrence of igneous rocks. Labs study suites of igneous rocks in thin section. Prerequisite: GEOL 2010. (Offered fall semester of odd-numbered years)

4130. Metamorphic Petrology. 2. Studies metamorphic rocks in thin section. Lectures cover mineralogy, phase equilibria and occurrence of metamorphic rocks. Labs study suites of metamorphic rocks in thin section. Prerequisite: GEOL 2010. (Offered spring semester of odd-numbered years)

4150. Paleontology of Lower Vertebrates. 4. Explores evolutionary histories of lower vertebrates including fishes, amphibians, reptiles and birds. Optional field trip. Prerequisites: acceptable previous training in geology or zoology, 12 hours of biology and/or geology or ZOO 4000. (Normally offered every third year)

4160. Paleontology of Early Mammals. 4. Examines evolutionary histories of mammals characteristic of Mesozoic era, plus Cenozoic monotremes and marsupials, as documented through fossil record study. Optional field trip. Prerequisites: 12 hours of biology and/or geology, ZOO 4000. (Normally offered every third year)

4170. Paleontology of Cenozoic Placental Mammals. 4. Explores evolutionary histories of placental mammals characteristic of Cenozoic era as documented through fossil record study. Optional field trip. Prerequisite: 12 hours of biology and/or geology or ZOO 4000. (Normally offered every third year)

4190. Petroleum Geology. 3. Principles governing the exploration for hydrocarbons; characteristics of reservoirs and traps; origin, migration and accumulation of hydrocarbons; subsurface evaluation techniques. Dual listed with GEOL 5190. Prerequisite: GEOL 2005 or PETE 3000.

4191. Methods in Petroleum Geology. 3. Lectures and laboratory exercises are designed to give the student experience in working with various kinds of geoscientific data in relation to the exploration for and production of hydrocarbons. Most exercises utilize real data and real situations. Topics include recognition of hydrocarbons, interpretation of sample, mud and geophysical logs, geologic utilization of drill stem tests; subsurface correlation and mapping techniques; prospect generation. Dual listed with GEOL 5191. Prerequisite: GEOL 4190.

4200 [4010]. Topics in Geology. 1‑3 (Max. 9). Studies particular geology topics in-depth at undergraduate level. Prerequisites: senior standing and 20 hours in geology.

4210 [4020]. Topics in Geophysics. 1‑3 (Max. 9). Studies particular geophysics topics in-depth at undergraduate level. Prerequisites: senior standing and 20 hours in geology.

4310. Advanced Stratigraphy. 3. Deals with characterizing and predicting the vertical and lateral distribution of sedimentary rocks. Includes correlation methods; use of facies models; facies delineation; impact of tectonics and changes in relative sea level on sedimentary record; transgressions and regressions; concept and construction of stratigraphic framework; and sequence stratigraphy. Prerequisite: GEOL 2100. (Normally offered spring semester)

4320. Cenozoic Stratigraphy. 4. Studies areal distribution, lithogenesis, depositional environment, correlation and faunas of North America's Cenozoic deposits. Optional field trip. Prerequisite: GEOL 2100. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4420. Sedimentary Rocks. 4. Encompasses origin, classification and interpretation of sedimentary rocks including sandstones, mudrocks and carbonates. Topics also include diagenesis and basin analysis. Field trip required. Prerequisites: GEOL 2010 and GEOL 2100. (Offered every other even-numbered year)

4444. Geohydrology. 4. [M3<>(none)] Discusses principles governing occurrence, movement and extraction of water in subsurface geologic environment. One required weekend field trip in September. Dual listed with GEOL 5444. Prerequisite: MATH 2205. (Normally offered spring semester)

4490. Geochemistry. 4. [M3<>(none)] Discusses chemical evolution of the Earth and details of chemical thermodynamics, phase rule chemistry, equilibrium reactions and reaction kinetics as applied to geology. Prerequisites: GEOL 2010, CHEM 1020, MATH 2200, 2205. (Normally offered spring semester)

4500. Photogeology. 3. Studies how photointerpretation is a primary tool for field geologists. Photogeology instructs and provides practical experience in interpretation of structure, lithology, land forms and surface processes from stereographic air photos and satellite imagery. Optional field trip. Prerequisite: GEOL 2100. (Normally offered spring semester)

4610. Structural Geology and Tectonics. 4. Encompasses lectures, readings and problems dealing with character and causes of structures that deform Earth's crust. Field trips required. Prerequisite: GEOL 2010. (Normally offered fall semester)

4460. Planetary Geology. 3. Examines basic principles of planetary geology and their application to specific planetary examples. Core topics include solar system formation, impact cratering, and comparative planetology. Provides an opportunity to test terrestrial theories under extreme conditions, and provides insight into both early earth history and ongoing geological processes. Prerequisites: GEOL 2010 and GEOL 2100 and (Math 1400/1405 or 1450).

4666. Plate Tectonics. 3. Studies theory of plate tectonics including quantitative assessment of observations which lead to its acceptance. Includes geometry of plate tectonics, plate boundaries and plate motions at present and in the past, evolution of plates including sea floor spreading and subduction processes, as well as driving mechanisms. Two lectures, one laboratory/discussion per week. Dual listed with GEOL 5666. Prerequisites: GEOL 4610, geology/geophysics math requirements. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4717 [5100]. Field Course in Geology. 2‑6 (Max. 6). Reviews field observation of geologic phenomena, methods of geologic mapping and interpretation of data collected. Course includes a six-week field trip. Prerequisites: GEOL 2100, 4610. (Offered early summer)

4720 [4700]. Ore Deposits. 4. Teaches principles of economic geology of ore minerals. Lectures cover geochemistry of ore minerals and environments in which various ore minerals are found. Labs include identification of ore minerals in hand sample and under microscope and methodology of economic geology. Dual listed with 5720. Prerequisite: GEOL 2020. (Normally offered fall semester)

4760. Rates and Timescales of Surface Processes. 3. Explores methods for quantifying rates and timescales of weathering, erosion, soil formation, nutrient cycling and other surface processes. Focus includes cosmogenic nuclides, tracer thermochronometry, U-series disequilibrium, fallout radionuclides, and optically stimulated luminescence. Course features a mix of instructor-driven lectures on fundamentals and student-driven discussion of cutting-edge research from recent literature. Dual listed with GEOL 5760. Prerequisites: GEOL2150 or GEOG 3010 or GEOL 4880 and MATH 2205 and CHEM 1020 and PHYS 1100.

4777. Geochemistry of Natural Waters. 3. [M3<>(none)] Studies physical chemistry applied to natural waters, and chemistry of rock weathering, sources and controls on major, minor and trace elements, plus problems related to introduced pollutants. Dual listed with GEOL 5777. Prerequisites: GEOL 2010, MATH 2205, and CHEM 1030.

4800. Independent Study. 1‑3 (Max. 6). Encompasses field, laboratory or library research for senior students in department. Prerequisites: senior standing and not fewer than 20 hours in geology. (Offered fall, spring and summer)

4820. Capstone. 3. [W3<>WC] Critical examination of landmark papers and their influence on the Earth sciences. Through readings, lectures, discussions and in oral and written presentations, the student will gain a broad perspective over the impact of key issues in the field. Prerequisites: junior standing and 26 hours in the department. (Normally offered spring semester)

4835 [4970]. Applied/Exploration Geophysics. 3. Discusses the fundamentals of Applied or Exploration Geophysics, encompassing lecture, laboratory classes and discussion of case histories. It covers the Seismic Refraction, Seismic Reflection, Gravity, and Magnetics methods. Provides a solid grounding about the exploration of the Earth's subsurface for mineral and hydrocarbon resources, and environmental issues. Dual listed with GEOL 5835. Prerequisites: GEOL 1100, one year of physics and MATH 2210. (Normally offered spring semester)

4850. Principles of Digital Filtering and Time Series Analysis. 3. Studies principles and applications of data processing techniques as used in seismic exploration, oceanography, gravity and magnetic prospecting, remote sensing and other areas of earth science. Includes discrete versus continuous time series; fourier and Z-transforms; layer matrix analysis; reflectivity function; deconvolution and predictive deconvolution; digital filter design; array analysis; velocity filters; and migration. Prerequisite: mathematics through calculus. (Normally offered fall semester)

4880. Earth Surface Processes. 3. [M3<>(none)] Quantitative interpretation of Earth's surface processes. Uses a quantitative approach to demonstrate how the development of landforms can be modeled. Prerequisites: MATH 2205 (2210 preferred), PHYS 1210.

4888. Glaciology. 3. [M3<>(none)] Dynamics of frozen water. Covers behavior of ice masses, in the form of glaciers or ice-sheets, and geomorphic aspects of glacial erosion and deposition. Includes forcing and feedbacks between cryosphere and global climate. Prerequisite: MATH 2205, PHYS 1210 (1310). (Offered every second year spring semester)

4990. Gravity Prospecting. 3. Encompasses lectures and laboratory treating gravity methods applied to structural interpretation and prospecting techniques. Discusses potential field theory gravity methods and case histories. Laboratory exercises cover topics discussed and include field work to conduct gravity measurements. Prerequisites: GEOL 4610 and one year of calculus. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

5000. Paleomagnetism in Geology/Geophysics. 3. Studies paleomagnetic solutions in geoscience topics. Includes plate reconstructions; sea-floor formation; structural geology; dating of structural/tectonic events; western North American tectonics; global geomagnetic polarity reversals and time scale; magneto-stratigraphic correlation; stratigraphic dating; dating diagenetic events; characteristics of core and mantle; extraterrestrial impacts and geologic phenomena; environmental and climate change applications. Field trip and laboratory project required. Dual listed with GEOL 4000. Prerequisite: GEOL 1000 or 1100, GEOL 1200 desirable.

5020. Fundamentals of Research. 2. Lectures, discussion and projects centered on three fundamental aspects of research: development of research tools, understanding the scientific method, learning how to write a grant, read the literature and present a talk. Class is designed for all incoming graduate students in the department. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5030. Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport Modeling. 3. Movement of groundwater and the dissolved solute is responsible for a variety of environmental, engineering, and geological processes of interest. Presents an overview of the analyses of groundwater flow and solute transport using numerical modeling. The principles of the Finite Difference Method are introduced. Dual listed with GEOL 4030. Prerequisites: MATH 2205, GEOL 5444.

5050. Introduction to Isotope Geology. 3. Understanding of atomic structure, radioactive decay, mass spectrometry, dating techniques and petrologic uses of isotropic systems. Emphasis will be placed on evaluating dating methods in relation to particular geologic problems and possible sources of error. The use of isotopes in defining magmatic sources and crustal contamination are discussed. Prerequisites: CHEM 1020, CHEM 1110, MATH 2200, MATH 2205.

5113. Geological Remote Sensing. 4. Acquaint students with aircraft and spacecraft remote sensing of the environment, emphasizing geological application to earth and other planetary bodies. Includes visible, infrared, ultraviolet, radio and radar sensing. The laboratory exercises are applications related to tectonics, geomorphology, paleoclimate, structure, statigraphy, environmental geology and geologic hazards. Dual listed with GEOL 4113 and cross listed with GEOG 4113/5113. Prerequisites: GEOL 1005 or 1100 or 1200 or GEOG 1010 and MATH 1400/1405 OR MATH 1450.

5120. Tectonic Evolution of the North American Cordillera. 4. Phanerozoic tectonic evolution of western North America viewed through the paradigm of plate tectonics. Course involves intensive literature review, guest speakers, a possible field trip, and an in-depth regional tectonic analysis to be done by each student. Prerequisite: GEOL 2020, GEOL 2100, and GEOL 4610.

5140. Advanced Igneous Petrology. 4. Review of the classification of igneous rocks, physical characteristics of magmas and processes of magmatic differentiation. Using this knowledge, the course examines the major type of global magmatism. Topics considered include mid-ocean ridges, subduction zones, layered complexes and continental volcanism. Prerequisite: GEOL 2020.

5150. Metamorphic Petrology. 4. Lectures on field occurrence, macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of igneous rocks, followed by lectures on application of physical chemistry to genetic study of igneous rocks. Laboratory devoted to the study of suites of igneous rocks from classical areas. Prerequisite: GEOL 2020 and 4490; graduate standing.

5160. Regional Tectonics. 4. The study of orogenic belts worldwide including both external and internal zones. Cross-section preparation is emphasized as well as geometric analysis. Includes lectures, readings, and a cross-section project. Prerequisite: GEOL 4610.

5180. Reflection Seismology. 3. Lectures treating seismic methods applied to the study of earth structures ranging from exploration to crustal structure. Topics covered include wave propagation recording techniques, processing, modeling, resolution and interpretation. Laboratory exercises give practical experience on lecture topics and emphasize use of instruments and data analysis. Computer processing introduced. Prerequisite: GEOL 1200, one year of calculus and one year of physics.

5190. Petroleum Geology. 3. Principles governing the exploration for hydrocarbons; characteristics of reservoirs and traps; origin, migration and accumulation of hydrocarbons; subsurface evaluation techniques. Dual listed with GEOL 4190. Prerequisites: GEOL 2100, 4610.

5191. Methods in Petroleum Geology. 3. Lectures and laboratory exercises are designed to give the student experience in working with various kinds of geoscientific data in relation to the exploration for and production of hydrocarbons. Most exercises utilize real data and real situations. Topics include recognition of hydrocarbons, interpretation of sample, mud and geophysical logs, geologic utilization of drill stem tests; subsurface correlation and mapping techniques; prospect generation. Dual listed with GEOL 4191. Prerequisite: GEOL 5190.

5200. Topics in Geology. 1-3 (Max. 9). Provides a detailed study at a graduate level of a particular topic in geology. Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology and geophysics and permission of the instructor.

5210. Topics in Geophysics. 1-3 (Max. 9). Provides a detailed study at a graduate level of a particular topic in geophysics. Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology and geophysics and permission of instructor.

5211. Seminar in Structural Geology and Tectonics. 1 (Max. 6). Selected topics in structural geology and tectonics. On-going research among undergraduate and graduate students is emphasized. Prerequisite: GEOL 4610 or equivalent course.

5212. Sedimentary Seminar. 1 (Max. 3). Seminar in selected topics in sedimentary geology. Designed to bring, and keep, graduate students up to date with the current literature and new, unpublished ideas. Visiting lecturers and presentations of student and faculty research. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5215. Inverse Theory. 3. Inverse theory is about learning the techniques to invert data for an acceptable model. The simplest example is least-squares fitting of a line. Covers inversion of both over and under-determined inverse problems, regularization techniques, bayesian theroy, along with probabilistic viewpoints. Prerequisites: graduate standing in geology and geophysics; linear algebra, MATLAB programming.

5216. Global Seismology. 3. Introductory class in theoretical seismology with emphasis on wave propagation. Topics include elastic wave theory for body and surface waves, normal modes, anisotropic wave propagation, source processes, derivation of the wave equation, the ray theoretical approximation, representation theorems, stress/strain constitutive relations, normal modes, surface waves, and attenuation operators. Prerequisites: graduate standing in geology or geophysics and permission of the instructor.

5217. Geodynamics. 3. Examines the fundamental physical processes necessary for the understanding of plate tectonics and a variety of other geological phenomena. Provides a solid grounding for future study and research covering plate tectonics, stress & strain, elasticity, isostasy & the flexural strength of the lithosphere, gravity, and thermal processes. Prerequisites: GEOL 1100, one year of college-level Physics and MATH 2210.

5220. Vertebrate Morphology and Evolution. 2. Course for paleontology majors and vertebrate anatomists involving advanced concepts, recent literature, and research training in the areas of morphology and evolution of fossil vertebrates. Cross listed with ZOO 5220. Prerequisite: GEOL/ZOO 4150 or GEOL/ZOO 4160, or GEOL/ZOO 4170 or ZOO 4000.

5230. Vertebrate Paleobiogeography. 2. Lectures and discussions devoted to use of data from the fossil record of vertebrates in interpreting ancient distributions of landmasses and seaways, recognizing paleoclimatic changes, and documenting the evolution of zoogeographic provinces. Prerequisite: GEOL/ZOO 4150, or GEOL/ZOO 4160 or GEOL/ZOO 4170.

5240. Vertebrate Biostratigraphy. 2. Lectures, discussion, and exercises devoted to use of the fossil record of vertebrates (with emphasis on mammalian assemblages) in recognizing contemporaneous physical and/or biological events within and between geographic areas. Field trip. Prerequisite: GEOL/ZOO 4150 or GEOL/ZOO 4160 or GEOL/ZOO 4170.

5300. Sedimentary Basins. 4. Sedimentary basin evolution are examined from the view point of plate tectonics, thermal histories, and lithospheric processes. Quantitative basin modeling techniques are applied to understanding subsidence histories, sea level changes, and the primary controls on the formation of stratigraphic sequences. Prerequisite: 1 year of calculus.

5330. Mechanics of Sediment Transport, Erosion and Deposition. 4.

5340. Advanced Tectonics and Sedimentation. 3. Lectures, seminars, and field observations on the relations between tectonism and the sedimentary record. Topics include a review of plate tectonic theory, characteristics of major types of sedimentary basins, techniques for evaluating tectonic activity from evidence in the sedimentary record and large-scale tectonosedimentary elements. Prerequisites: graduate standing, GEOL 2100, and GEOL 4610.

5350. Diagenesis of Clastic Sedimentary Rocks. 5. The study of diagenesis of clastic sedimentary rocks utilizing all available observational, experimental and theoretical data. Particular attention will be given to the relationship between diagenesis and porosity (mass transfer). The objective of the course is to understand diagenetic processes and ultimately to make porosity predictions in a variety of geological terrains. Laboratories consist of examining suites of thin sections and rocks from a variety of classical techniques used in studying diagenetic problems. The first semester emphasizes the observation aspects of clastic diagenesis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5410. Geochemical Analytical Methods. 4. Lectures and laboratories in analytical methods used in geochemical studies. Particular emphasis given to sampling and sample preparation, inductively coupled argon plasma emission, atomic absorption analysis. Other analytical methods are also treated. Prerequisite: GEOL 4490.

5420. Surfaces and Interfaces. 3. Examines the role of surfaces and solid-solution interfaces in regulating the chemistry of the Earth's surface. Subjects to be covered includes surface tension, capillarity, and the thermodynamics of surfaces; the equilibrium and kinetic chemistry of absorption-desorption; dissolution-precipitation kinetics and controlling factors; surface catalysis; and surface oxidation-reduction reactions. Presented in the context of geochemically and environmentally important processes such as chemical weathering, partitioning of solutes between water and surfaces, and the transport and degradation of pollutants. Prerequisite: One of the following GEOL 4490, 4777, 5777, CHEM 3020, CHEM 4507.

5430. Applied Geostatistics. 3. Designed to provide general geostatistical analyses and their applications for spatial random variables and functions. Topics covered include variogram, cross validation, kirging, cokirging, sampling strategies, and both non-conditional and conditional simulations. Several geostatistics packages are used to analyze real field data and students are encouraged to use their own data for practicing geostatistical applications. Examples are taken from geohydrology, soil science, crop science, mining, and various environmental studies. Prerequisite: STAT 4010.

5444. Geohydrology. 3. Discusses principles governing occurrence, movement and extraction of water in subsurface geologic environment. Once required weekend field trip in September. Dual listed with GEOL 4444. Prerequisite: MATH 2205.

5446. Introduction to Geostatistics. 3. The development of the basic principles of geostatistics and its practical applications in the geosciences will be presented. Main topics include: spatial analysis, kriging, cokriging, geostatistical simulations (unconditional, conditional). If time permits additional topics include: simple kriging, indicator kriging and block kriging. Prerequisites: MATH 2200, 2205, 2250 and STAT 2000.

5450. Geochemical Modeling. 3. Modeling of geochemical processes in fluid-rock systems of the Earth's crust. Emphasizes development and application of conceptual models as well as quantitative numerical models. Reinforces and expands fundamental skills in aqueous and fluid-rock geochemistry to better understand geochemical processes and solve problems in fluid-rock systems. Prerequisite: GEOL 4777/5777 or GEOL 5610 or GEOL 4490.

5460. Introductory Geomodeling. 3. Introductory course in numerical modeling in the geosciences, offering insight into the generalities of modeling. Develop, simple geo-models, which allow hands on experience constructing and testing computer models. As a minimum, develop one extensive Finite Difference model and one minimalistic Finite Element model; other techniques will depend on student interests. Prerequisites: at least one calculus and one physics course, and senior or graduate standing.

5480. Spatial Information Sciences Seminar. 1. There are many earth science technologies, remote sensing, GIS and GPS. Synergism among these technologies increase the range of solutions for research and management. A forum for presentation of these solutions or questions requiring solutions. Prerequisites: a course in remote sensing, GIS, GPS, and graduate standing.

5550. Numerical Methods in Ground Water Geology I. 3. Numerical solution of ground water flow equations with emphasis on steady state and elementary time dependent finite difference techniques. Prerequisites: GEOL 4444 or 5444, competence in FORTRAN programming.

5560. Numerical Methods in Ground Water Geology II. 3. Time dependent digital simulation models designed to forecast impacts of ground water developments. Prerequisite: GEOL 5550.

5570. Advanced Geohydrology. 3. Aquifer performance and testing, ground water basin development and management, conjunctive use of ground and surface water, and regional water resource investigations. Prerequisite: GEOL 4444 or 5444.

5600. Theoretical Petrology. 3. Graphic and analytical techniques used to evaluate the genesis of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Principles of thermodynamics, activity-composition relations, and G-X diagrams will be reviewed. Igneous topics include: use of phase diagrams, heat and mass transfer, magma generation. Fluid rock equilibra and Schreinemakers' analysis will be used to evaluate the origin of metamorphic rocks. Prerequisites: GEOL 4490.

5610. Geological Thermodynamics I. 4. Laws of thermodynamics, conditions which constitute chemical equilibrium, and multiple component systems as applied in geologic problems. Prerequisites: MATH 2200, MATH 2205, CHEM 1030, consent of instructor.

5630. Electronic Microprobe. 3. Lectures cover the theory of X-ray emission analysis, microprobe instrumentation, and data reduction procedures. Labs cover various uses of mocroprobe in solving geological problems. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

5640. Advanced Igneous Petrology Seminar. 1-3 (Max. 9). Advanced training in igneous petrology emphasizing applications of chemical principles to the study of ingneous rocks. Each year a different aspect of igneous petrology are covered in detail. Prerequisites: GEOL 4490, 5050.

5650. Advanced Metamorphic Petrology. 3. Review of the literature and study of the advanced concepts in metamorphic petrology. Prerequisite: GEOL 5150.

5660. Microstructural Analysis of Deformed Rocks. 4. The use of microscope in the interpretation of natural strain in rocks is emphasized. Lectures and extensive laboratory exercises are the principle components of the course. Microfabric analysis using the universal stage is introduced. Prerequisites: GEOL 4610 required, GEOL 5150 recommended.

5666. Plate Tectonics. 3. The theory of plate tectonics including a quantitative assessment of the observations which lead to its acceptance and limitations. Topics include: geometry of plate tectonics, plate boundaries and plate motions at present and in the past, evolution of plates including sea floor spreading and subduction processes, and driving mechanisms. Two lectures, one laboratory/discussion per week. Dual listed with GEOL 4666. Prerequisites: GEOL 4610, geology/geophysics math requirements.

5670. Earth Rheology. 3. Processes of deformation and flow in the earth. Topics include stress, strain, elasticity, mechanical behavior of rocks, mechanics of faulting, microphysics of flow, stress and rheology of earth. Prerequisites: GEOL 2020, GEOL 4610, MATH 2210 or PHYS 2310.

5700. Seminar in Structure and Development of the Earth's Crust. 3. Seminar in structure and development of the Earth's crust. Topics include structure and geochemistry of the Precambrian plate tectonics in the Precambrian early history of the Earth, seismic refraction crustal models, seismic reflection crustal models, and crustal genesis. Prerequisites: admission is by consent of instructor, GEOL 4610 and one semester of geophysics.

5720. Ore Deposits. 4. Teaches principles of economic geology of ore minerals. Lectures cover geochemistry of ore minerals and environments in which various ore minerals are found. Labs include identification of ore minerals in hand sample and under microscope and methodology of economic geology. Dual listed with GEOL 4720. Prerequisite: GEOL 2010.

5730. Seismic Data Processing. 3. Fundamentals of seismic reflection data processing: processing of field tapes, cross-correlation, velocity analysis, stacking, deconvolution. Statistics correct, migration, coherency filtering. Prerequisites: GEOL 5180, MATH 4430, MATH 4440.

5740. Seismic Reflection Interpretation. 3. Seminar in processing and interpretation of seismic reflection data including deep crustal data. Prerequisites: GEOL 4610, GEOL 5180, and consent of instructor.

5760. Rates and Timescales of Surface Processes. 3. Explores methods for quantifying rates and timescales of weathering, erosion, soil formation, nutrient cycling and other surface processes. Focus includes cosmogenic nuclides, tracer thermochronometry, U-series disequilibrium, fallout radionuclides, and optically stimulated luminescence. Course features a mix of instructor-driven lectures on fundamentals and student-driven discussion of cutting-edge research from recent literature. Dual listed with GEOL 4760. Prerequisites: GEOL2150 or GEOG 3010 or GEOL 4880 and MATH 2205 and CHEM 1020 and PHYS 1100.

5777. Geochemistry of Natural Waters. 3. Physical chemistry of solutions applied to natural waters. Chemistry of rock weathering, controls on major, minor, and trace element contents of natural waters. Problems of introduced pollutants. Dual listed with GEOL 4777. Prerequisites: GEOL 2010, MATH 2205, and CHEM 1030.

5800. Advanced Remote Sensing and Technical Mapping. 2-5 (Max. 5). Application of computer methods to spectral analysis, image processing, geometric correction, data transformation, global positioning, digital photogrammetry, and automated interpretation. Integration of spectral data, image interpretation, field mapping, photogrammetric analysis, and map/image analysis will be emphasized. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5810. Remote Sensing Seminar. 1. A two-semester sequence of seminars on selected topics in remote sensing. Designed to familiarize the student with recent developments in remote sensing hardware, data processing, and applications. Prerequisites: GEOL 4111 or 5111 and consent of instructor.

5820. Advanced Geomorphology. 1-3 (Max. 6). Graduate reading and discussion seminar on current topics in surficial processes. An in-depth analysis of the literature and work, with the subject matter determined by student interest. May include lectures. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in geology.

5835. Applied/Exploration Geophysics. 3. Discusses the fundamentals of Applied or Exploration Geophysics, encompassing lecture, laboratory classes and discussion of case histories. Covers the Seismic Refraction, Seismic Reflection, Gravity, and Magnetics methods. Provides a solid grounding about the exploration of the Earth's subsurface for mineral and hydrocarbon resources and environmental issues. Dual listed with GEOL 4835. Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5850. Economic Geology. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5851. Environmental Geology. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5852. Geochemistry. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5853. Geomorphology. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5854. Geophysics. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5855. Ground Water Hydrology. 1-6 (Max. 7). Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5856. Mathematical and Statistical Geology. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5857. Mineralogy and Crystallography. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5858. Paleontology. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5859. Petrology. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5860. Sedimentology. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5861. Stratigraphy. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5862. Structural Geology. 1-6 (Max. 6). Prerequisite: graduate standing in geology.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3 (Max. 3). Work in classroom with a major professor. Expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1 - 2. (Max 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5959. Enrichment Studies. 1-3 (Max. 99). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate degree program.

5980. Dissertation Research. 1-12. (Max. 48). Designed for students who are involved in research for their dissertation project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their dissertation. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate level degree program.

5990. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 14). Prerequisite: graduate standing. Introductory course in numerical modeling in the geosciences, offering insight into the generalities of modeling. Develop, simple geo-models, which allow hands on experience constructing and testing computer models. As a minimum, develop one extensive Finite Difference model and one minimalistic Finite Element model; other techniques will depend on student interests. Prerequisites: at least one calculus and one physics course, and senior or graduate standing.

Share This Page:

Footer Navigation

University of Wyoming
 
1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071 // UW Operators (307) 766-1121 // Contact Us