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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Kinesiology (KIN)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

1004 [PEPR 1004]. Foundations of Physical Education. 3. [(none)<>I, L] An introductory course designed to acquaint first year or second year students to the academic discipline of physical education with an emphasis on the teaching career. Cross listed with HLED 1004.

1005 [PEPR 1005]. Kinesiology, Health, and Teaching Physical Activity. 3. [(none)<>I, L] A survey of the disciplines of kinesiology, health, and teaching physical activity. Students master knowledge specific to kinesiology, health, and teaching physical activity while developing critical thinking skills and basic competence in communication skills and information literacy.

1040. Contemporary Topics in North American Sport. 3. [(none)<>CH,D] An introductory course that focuses on sport as an institution in North American society. A range of topics is explored from diverse perspectives (historical, sociological, psychological, political, and gender theories), so learners can critically examine what it means to be a part of "sport" in contemporary North American society. Prerequisites: none.

1052 [PEPR 1052]. Introduction to Athletic Training. 3. Provides the prospective athletic trainer with the skill and knowledge necessary to improve a risk management and preventative program for athletes and others involved in physical activity.

1058 [PEPR 1058]. Emergency Management of Athletic Injury/Illness. 3. Provides the prospective athletic trainer with the skill and knowledge necessary to provide for emergency care, triage, and management of emergencies and life-threatening situations for the physically active.

2000 [PEPR 2000]. Movement Core I: Striking/Fielding and Invasion Games. 2. Exposes students to skill and tactical themes comprising striking/fielding and invasion games. Course aims for students' ability to understand, demonstrate and analyze the different offensive and defensive tactics that facilitate game play success in invasion (soccer, tag rugby, basketball) and striking/fielding (softball, cricket) games. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, declared PHET major, completion or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1400.

2001 [KIN 1025, PEPR 1025]. Movement Core II: Net and Target Games. 2. Exposes students to skill and tactical themes comprising net and target games. Course aims for students' ability to understand, demonstrate and analyze different offensive and defensive tactics facilitating game play success in net (volleyball, tennis, badminton) and target (archery) games. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, declared PHET major, completion or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1400.

2002 Movement Core III: Fundamental Motor Skills. 2. Designed to provide pre-service physical education teachers with the content and teaching strategies associated with teaching motor skills to school aged children grades K-5. Students learn both skill themes and movement concepts. Students have the opportunity to apply skills and knowledge in a practical experience with young children in a school based PE setting. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, declared PHET major, completion or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1400.

2003 [KIN 1000, PEPR 1000]. Movement Core IV: Educational Games and Gymnastics. 2. To provide pre-service teachers (PTs) with the skills and knowledge necessary to teach educational games and gymnastics to public school students. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, declared PHET major, completion or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1400.

2004 [KIN 3025, PEPR 3025]. Movement Core V: Fundamental Motor Skills, Creative Movement, and Dance. 3. [C3<>CA] Designed for prospective physical education teachers K-12. Fundamental motor skills, dance, and creative movement and the associated teaching behaviors needed to teach this content to K-12 learners is the focus of this course. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, declared PHET major, completion or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1400.

2005 [KIN 2025, PEPR 2025]. Movement Core VI: Physical Fitness and Physical Activity 2. [P1<>(none)] Designed for prospective school-based physical and health education teachers K-12. Focuses on five primary content areas: what is fitness education and why do we need it; development of conent-based fitness curriculum; teaching cognitive aspects of fitness education; teaching physical aspects of fitness education; and promoting fitness education. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, declared PHET major, completion or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1400.

2010 [PEPR 2010]. Field Experience for Prospective Elementary and Secondary Teachers. 1-4 (Max. 4). Provides initial experience in the public school setting. Full-time assignment of one to four weeks in a public school under supervision of a certified teacher. Students serve as teacher aides.

2012 [PEPR 2012]. Physical Education for Elementary Schools. 2. Emphasizes impact that a sound elementary physical education program can have on growth and development of healthy children. Students identify the need for a balanced physical education program. Focuses on curriculum, teaching styles, class management and instruction. Prerequisite: EDFD 2040 or consent of instructor.

2015 [PEPR 2015]. Methods of Teaching Social Dance Forms. 1. Develops a large repertoire in folk, square, round and social dance. Students acquire knowledge and confidence in methods of teaching these forms. Prerequisite: KIN 1031.

2017 [PEPR 2017]. Water Safety Instructors' Course. 1. Examines procedures and standards as required by the American Red Cross in analysis, performances and teaching techniques. Includes five styles of swimming and senior lifesaving. Prerequisites: 18 years of age and a current Senior Life Saving Certificate.

2040 [PEPR 2040]. Human Anatomy. 3. [S1<>SB] Study of human structure in terms of its microscopic and gross anatomy. Provides students with adequate background to study human physiological function. The corresponding course, to be taken concurrently, is ZOO/KIN 2041. Cross listed with ZOO 2040. Prerequisite: LIFE 1000 or 1010.

2041 [PEPR 2041]. Human Anatomy Laboratory. 1. [S1<>SB] A laboratory study of human structure in terms of human microscopic and gross anatomy. This laboratory course is designed to provide students with an adequate background to study human physiology and kinesiological function. Prerequisite: KIN/ZOO 2040 or concurrent enrollment in KIN/ZOO 2040.

2057 [PEPR 2057]. Assessment and Evaluation of Athletic Injury/Illness I. 3. Provides the prospective athletic trainer with the skill and knowledge necessary to evaluate and recognize upper extremity, cervical spine, and head injuries that occur to the athlete and physically active. Prerequisites: KIN 1052, 1058, 2040, and 2041; concurrent enrollment in KIN 2068.

2058 [PEPR 2058]. Assessment and Evaluation of Athletic Injury/Illness II. 3. Provides the prospective athletic trainer with the skill and knowledge necessary to evaluate and recognize lower extremity and spine injuries that occur to the athlete and physically active. Prerequisites: KIN 2057; concurrent enrollment in KIN 2078.

2068. Athletic Training Clinical I. 1. Provides clinical and field experience for the athletic training student. Skill and knowledge learned in KIN 1052 and 1058 are applied in the clinical and field settings. Prerequisites: KIN 1052, 1058, 2040, and 2041; concurrent enrollment in KIN 2057.

2069 [PEPR 2069]. History and Philosophy of Sport. 3. Discusses history of sport with emphasis on contributions of Greeks and Romans. Studies influence of Scandinavian countries, Germany and other European nations, plus sports and games of the American Indians. Includes sports in the U.S. from colonial period through present and influence of selected educational philosophers on sports. (Offered fall semester)

2078. Athletic Training Clinical II. 1. Provides clinical and field experience for the athletic training student. Skill and knowledge learned in KIN 1052, 1058, and 2057 are applied in the clinical and field settings. Prerequisites: KIN 2057 and 2068; concurrent enrollment in KIN 2058.

2080 [3090, PEPR 3090]. Coaching Football. 2. For those who wish to become proficient in skills and techniques of teaching fundamentals and team organization of modern football. Presents use of audiovisual materials for teaching and scouting purposes. Prerequisites: successful completion of USP core requirement I. (Offered spring semester)

2081 [3091, PEPR 3091]. Coaching Basketball. 2. For all men and women wishing to coach basketball. Presents organization of practice schedule, meeting the public, varsity travel and fundamentals of offense and defense. Prerequisites: successful completion of USP core requirement I. (Offered fall semester)

2082 [3092, PEPR 3092] Coaching Track and Field. 2. For those interested in teaching or coaching track and field. Prerequisites: successful completion of USP core requirement I. (Offered fall semester)

2083 [3093, PEPR 3093]. Coaching Swimming. 2. Acquaints students with many different aspects of aquatics; provides understanding of rhythmical parts of selected swimming strokes; explains water safety; discusses  teaching and coaching aspect of a total swimming program. Prerequisites: successful completion of USP core requirement I. (Offered fall semester)

2084 [3094, PEPR 3094]. Coaching Wrestling. 2. Acquaints and prepares students with theory and techniques involved in teaching and coaching wrestling. Prerequisites: successful completion of USP core requirement I. (Offered spring semester)

2085 [3095, PEPR 3095]. Coaching Volleyball. 2. Encompasses techniques of coaching volleyball with emphasis on skill analysis, strategy, team dynamics and training. Prerequisites: successful completion of USP core requirement I. (Offered fall semester)

2086 [3096, PEPR 3096]. Coaching Gymnastics. 2. Helps students organize and administer competitive gymnastics program and introduces coaching and training philosophies used in gymnastics. Prerequisites: successful completion of USP core requirement I. (Offered fall semester)

2087 [3097, PEPR 3097]. Coaching Baseball. 2. Encompasses theories and techniques of coaching baseball. Emphasizes team and individual position play. Prerequisites: successful completion of USP core requirement I. (Offered fall semester)

2088 [3098, PEPR 3098]. Coaching Tennis. 2. Examines techniques of coaching tennis. Emphasizes skill analysis, strategy and training. Prerequisites: successful completion of USP core requirement I. (Offered spring semester)

2089 [3099, PEPR 3099]. Coaching Soccer. 2. Explores techniques of coaching soccer. Emphasizes skill analysis, strategy, team dynamics and training. Prerequisites: successful completion of USP core requirement I.

2091 [PEPR 2091]. Rules and Techniques of Athletic Officiating I. 2. Surveys techniques and rules of athletic officiating. Emphasizes principles and procedures necessary to become an effective official. Laboratory experience in officiating is provided that covers the officiating aspects of football, cross country, basketball and wrestling.

2092 [PEPR 2092]. Rules and Techniques of Athletic Officiating II. 2. Surveys techniques and rules of athletic officiating. Emphasizes principles and procedures necessary to become an effective official. Provides laboratory experience in officiating, covering officiating aspects of swimming, volleyball, track and field and baseball.

2900. Topics In:__. 1-3 (Max. 3). Course Topics could include Peer Health Education, Current Issues in Health, etc. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

3010 [PEPR 3010]. Fundamentals of Health and Fitness Assessment. 3. Students will learn the fundamental concepts of health appraisal, assessment of health-related fitness and physical fitness levels, individual and group exercise programming and leadership, and methods of behavioral change. Fitness will be discussed in both theoretical and practical terms with an emphasis on adults. Has lecture and lab components. Prerequisites: completed or concurrent enrollment in KIN 3021; 2.5 GPA.

3011 [PEPR 3011]. Teaching Methods in Physical Education K-12. 3. Develops knowledge, skills and understandings appropriate to successful participation in a class setting when functioning in the teaching role. Prerequisites: grade of C or better in KIN 3012 and 3034; 2.75 minimum GPA; concurrent enrollment in KIN 3015.

3012 [PEPR 3012]. Teaching Laboratory I. 3. Provides the opportunity to develop skills and acquire knowledge needed to teach physical education. Allows the opportunity for students to evaluate the motor status and progress of a preschool aged child, as well as plan and implement a developmentally appropriate motor program. Prerequisites: Completed KIN 1000, 1004, 1025, 2000, 2025, 3025, and THEA 3025; concurrent enrollment in KIN 3034; 2.5 GPA. (Offered fall semester)

3015 [PEPR 3015]. Teaching Laboratory II. 3. [(none)<>WC] Provides pre-service physical education teacher with skills, knowledge and principles of teaching through application of peer teaching and small group elementary school teaching. Emphasizes and practices program development, lesson planning and development of a physical education teaching unit. Prerequisites: grade of C or better in KIN 3012 and 3034; 2.75 minimum cumulative GPA; concurrent enrollment in KIN 3011, 4055 and 4080. (Offered spring semester)

3020 [PEPR 3020]. Observational Experience in Movement Science. 1-2 (Max. 6). Provides students with off-campus opportunity to observe professionals in the work place. Emphasis is placed on physical or occupational therapy. Conducted under supervision and arranged by coordinator of undergraduate programs. Offered S/U only. Prerequisites: sophomore status, consent of coordinator of undergraduate programs, 2.5 GPA.

3021 [PEPR 3021]. Physiology of Exercise. 4. [M3<>(none)] Applies physiological principles to human physical activities. Emphasizes interaction of neuromuscular, circulatory and respiratory mechanisms as affecting, and affected by, immediate exercise situation and physical training. Includes laboratory. Cross listed with ZOO 3021. Prerequisites: QA, KIN/ZOO 2040 and 3115; minimum 2.5 GPA. (Offered fall and spring semesters)

3034 [PEPR 3034]. Lifespan Motor Development. 3. Studies lifespan motor development. Emphasizes developmental periods of infancy through adolescence. Gives attention to observation and analysis of motor behavior and movement performance of individuals across lifespan. Prerequisites: PSYC 1000; junior status; 2.50 GPA. (Offered fall semester)

3037 [PEPR 3037]. Sport Psychology. 3. Studies psychological theories and techniques applied to sport to enhance the performance and personal growth of athletes and coaches. Emphasizes the influence of personality, anxiety, motivation, social factors, and psychological skills training. Prerequisite: Admitted to the last two years of one of the programs in DK&H. Prerequisites: PSYC 1000, junior status and 2.50 GPA.

3038. Exercise Psychology. 3. Studies psychological theories for understanding and predicting health-oriented exercise behavior, including psychological intentions for increasing exercise participation and adherence. Emphasizes psychological and psychobiological responses to exercise. Prerequisites: admitted to the last two years of one of the programs in DK&H.

3040 [PEPR 3040]. Teaching Human Anatomy. 3. Students develop communication and teaching skills while expanding their knowledge in anatomy. Under faculty instruction, each student develops lecture and laboratory lessons for all human anatomy systems. Under direct faculty supervision, each student demonstrates their teaching skills through preparation of videotape segments and actual laboratory teaching experience in the lower-division human anatomy course. Prerequisites: KIN/ZOO 2040, junior status and consent of instructor.

3042 [PEPR 3042]. Biomechanics of Human Movement. 3. Introduces fundamental principles of human movement. Includes study and elementary analysis of human motion based on anatomical and mechanical principles. Prerequisites: KIN/ZOO 2040; PHYS 1050 or 1110 or 1210 or 1310; minimum 2.5 GPA.

3050 [PEPR 3050]. Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries. 2. Encompasses theory and practical work in the field of athletic training. Strongly emphasizes prevention and care of athletic injuries, including wrapping and taping techniques. Prerequisites: junior status; LIFE 1000 or 1010; minimum 2.5 GPA.

3052 [PEPR 3052]. Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries. 3. Provides a foundation of appropriate rehabilitation principles and techniques based on current research/rationale. The scope is inclusive of approaches applicable to common sports medicine problems. Prerequisites: KIN 2058 and 2078; minimum GPA of 2.50.

3058 [PEPR 3058]. Therapeutic Modalities for the Athletic Trainer. 3. Provides the prospective athletic trainer with the knowledge and skill necessary to use therapeutic modalities for the health care of the physically active. Prerequisites: KIN 3052 and 3068; minimum GPA of 2.50.

3060. Understanding Skill Acquisition for Teaching. 3. Addresses practical questions specific to teaching physical activity - who are my students, what skills am I teaching, how do I teach skills effectively?  Examine such concepts as individual differences, nature of motor skills, content and structure of skill practice, and the art of giving feedback. Prerequisites: PSYC 1000 or equivalent; admission to professional program in PHET.

3068. Athletic Training Clinical III. 2. Provides clinical and field experience for the athletic training student. Skill and knowledge learned in KIN 2057 and 2058 are applied in the clinical and field settings. Prerequisites: KIN 2058 and 2078; concurrent enrollment in KIN 3052; minimum GPA of 2.50.

3078. Athletic Training Clinical IV. 2. Provides clinical and field experience for the athletic training student. Skill and knowledge learned in KIN 2057, 2058, and 3052 are applied in the clinical and field settings. Prerequisites: KIN 3052 and 3068; concurrent enrollment in KIN 3058; minimum GPA of 2.50.

3115. [KIN 2110, PEPR 2110]. Human Systems Physiology. 4. Covers the fundamental function(s) of the human body systems, from cells and tissues through organs and systems, focusing also on biological communication and homeostasis. Students learn how to interpret physiological data. Includes laboratory and tutorial sessions. Fulfills degree requirement in physiology subsection for zoology major. Cross listed with ZOO 3115. Prerequisites: At least ((C in CHEM 1020 or CHEM 1050) or B in CHEM 1000) and C in LIFE 1010.

4001 [PEPR 4001]. Short Course in Physical Education for Undergraduates. 1‑6 (Max. 6). Highlights special topics in kinesiology at the undergraduate level, based on need. Maximum allowable credit is 6 semester hours. Offered S/U only. Prerequisites: junior status and 2.50 cumulative GPA.

4012 [PEPR 4012]. Curriculum Development in Physical Education. 2. Focuses on the design of K-12 school physical education programs. It provides opportunities to study alternative curriculum models, engage in the process of curriculum design, and examine policy and theoretical issues of concern to curriculum designers. Prerequisites: grade of C or better in KIN 3011, 3015 and 4080; 2.75 minimum cumulative GPA; concurrent enrollment in KIN 4017. (Offered fall semester)

4013. School Administration for the Health Sciences. 2. Provides teaching majors with information about staff-administrator relationships in school settings. Topics include principles of leadership, school organization and culture, legal issues, financial issues, building and facilities management. Prerequisites: senior status, acceptance into the Physical Education Teacher Education program, and minimum GPA of 2.75.

4015 [PEPR 4015]. Internship Experience in Kinesiology. 1‑12 (Max. 12). Provides culminating clinical experience at a business, industry or institution related to students' aspirations and training. Conducted under Kinesiology departmental faculty member. Offered S/U only. Cross listed with HLED 4015. Prerequisites: junior standing, KIN 3021; 2.50 GPA.

4016. Research Experience in Kinesiology and Health. 1-6 (Max. 6). Offered to students who wish to gain a research experience in Kinesiology and Health. Meant for students who are interested in pursuing an advanced degree. Students may choose to complete KIN/HLED 4016 instead of KIN/HLED 4015. Cross listed with HLED 4016. Prerequisites: minimum junior standing; completed KIN 3021; minimum 2.50 GPA.

4017 [PEPR 4017]. Teaching Laboratory III. 3. Focuses on the application of teaching skills and the effective utilization of sport-based curricular and instructional models in the secondary public school setting. Prerequisites: grade of C or better in KIN 3011, 3015, and 4080; 2.75 minimum cumulative GPA; concurrent enrollment in KIN 4012. (Offered fall semester)

4020. Motor Behavior. 3. Provides undergraduate majors in kinesiology and health the foundation of motor learning and control theories to be applied to decisions related to the enhancement of human performance. Prerequisites: PSYC 1000 or equivalent course; admission to professional program in K&HP.

4024. Physical Activity Epidemiology. 3. This course will examine physical activity from a public health perspective. Topics include study design, critical appraisal of research, assessment of physical activity, relationships between physical activity and health outcomes, and current issues in physical activity epidemiology. Dual listed with KIN 5024. Prerequisite: KIN 3021.

4029 [PEPR 4029]. Methods of Training and Conditioning. 3. Gives students knowledge and experience needed to develop and lead exercise training programs. Of interest to teachers, coaches and fitness leaders. Prerequisites: junior standing, KIN 3021 and minimum 2.50 GPA. (Offered spring semester)

4042. Applied Biomechanics. 3. Provides understanding of biomechanical theories and the application of biomechanical measurements to human movement in sports, training, and rehabilitation. Emphasis on using equipment to collect biomechanical data to answer research and clinical questions. Lecture and data collection topics include electromyography, force, balance, kinematics, and kinetics. Prerequisites: KIN 3042.

4052 [PEPR 4052]. General Medical Conditions for the Athletic Trainer. 3. Provides the prospective athletic trainer with the knowledge and skill necessary to recognize, manage, and refer the general medical conditions, disabilities and pathologies that occur to athletes and the physically active. Prerequisites: KIN 3058 and 3078; concurrent enrollment in KIN 4068; minimum GPA of 2.50. (Offered fall semester)

4055 [PEPR 4055]. Adapted Physical Education. 2. Presents skills necessary to plan, implement and evaluate individualized physical education programs in the least restrictive environment. Acquaints students with current laws, characteristics, assessment instruments and nationally validated programs in physical education for the disabled child. Prerequisites: KIN 3034 and 2.50 GPA. (Offered spring semester)

4056 [PEPR 4056]. Advanced Exercise Testing and Prescription. 4. Teaches foundational electrocardiography to perform graded exercise stress tests (GXT), performance of GXT's to health and diseased populations based on a health appraisal assessment. Knowledge used to develop comprehensive exercise prescriptions, make metabolic calculations. Emphasis on how physical activity, nutrition/weight management, and behavioral factors interact with exercise programming. Dual listed with KIN 5056. Prerequisites: completion of KIN 3010 and 3021; 2.5 GPA; CPR Certification.

4058 [PEPR 4058]. Organization, Administration, and Pharmacology for the Athletic Trainer. 3. Provides the prospective athletic trainer with the knowledge and skill necessary to better understand the pharmacology and administration of athletic health management. Prerequisites: KIN 3052 and 3068; concurrent enrollment in KIN 3058 and KIN 3078; minimum GPA of 2.50. (Offered spring semester)

4062. Applied Concepts in Human Aging. 3. Designed to integrate and apply concepts acquired in core KIN and HLED courses (e.g. human physiology, exercise physiology, health promotion, etc.) to the growing of older/aging adults. Age-related pathologies will be presented and discussed as will be the scientific method. Prerequisites: KIN 3021; minimum 2.5 GPA; junior standing.

4065 [PEPR 4065]. Resources in Adapted Physical Education. 2-3 (Max. 3). Offers flexible credit for students interested in pursuing intensive study of resources for adapted physical education. Required for state endorsement in Adapted Physical Education. Prerequisites: junior status, KIN 4055 and minimum 2.50 GPA.

4066. Biological Factors Influencing Exercise Performance. 3. Application of physiological responses to exercise to special conditions. A focus on skeletal muscle fiber typing and the importance of fiber type distribution in athletics. Factors like nutritional needs of athletes, use of ergogenic aids, the female and child athlete, exercise in "hostile" environments, and long term competitive events covered. Prerequisite: KIN 3021; 2.50 GPA.

4068. Athletic Training Clinical V. 3. Provides clinical and field experience for the athletic training student. Skill and knowledge learned in KIN 3052 and 3058 are applied in the clinical and field settings. Prerequisites: KIN 3058 and 3078; concurrent enrollment in KIN 4052; minimum GPA of 2.50.

4074 [PEPR 4074]. Field Studies in _____. 1‑5 (Max. 12). Offered only through extension services. Broad and flexible and can be utilized in numerous situations to meet local needs. (Credit in this course is not applicable toward advanced degrees.) Cross listed with HLED 4074. Offered for S/U grade only.

4075. Assessment in Adapted Physical Education. 3. Designed to provide an overview of the assessment process in adapted physical education. Developmentally and disability appropriate psychomotor assessments and procedures for administering them are examined. Prerequisites: KIN 4055, KIN 4080.

4080 [PEPR 4080]. Assessment in Physical Education. 3. [(none)<>WC] Provides prospective teachers with a thorough knowledge of learner assessment as applied to physical education K-12. Prerequisites: grade of C or better in KIN 3012 and 3034; 2.75 minimum cumulative GPA. (Offered spring semester)

4085 [PEPR 4085]. Honor Studies in Physical Education. 2‑10 (Max. 10). Provides flexible credit for undergraduate honor students to study under distinguished faculty in a specialized academic area of interest at UW or any other approved college or university. Prerequisites: 3.00 cumulative GPA and admission to physical education honors program.

4086 [PEPR 4086]. Honors Seminar. 2. Independent study. Consists of in-depth application of experimental techniques and materials to appropriate academic areas which directly support students' majors. Offered for S/U grade only. Prerequisites: 3.00 cumulative GPA and admission to physical education honors program.

4088. Athletic Training Clinical VI. 3. Provides clinical and field experience for the athletic training student. Skill and knowledge learned in KIN 3052, 3058 AND 4052 are applied in the clinical and field settings. Prerequisites: KIN 4052 and 4068; concurrent enrollment in KIN 4058; minimum GPA of 2.50.

4090 [PEPR 4090]. Foundations of Coaching. 3. Coaches must be effective teachers, trainers, fund-raisers, recruiters, motivators, administrators, and counselors. The major purpose of this course is to provide future coaches with current information about the eight domains of essential coaching skills identified in the NSSC. These domains include philosophy and ethics, safety and injury prevention, physical conditioning, growth and development, teaching and communication, sport skills and tactics, organization and administration, and evaluation. Dual listed with KIN 5090. Prerequisites: junior status and 2.5 cumulative GPA.

4097 [PEPR 4097]. Individual Problems. 1‑3 (Max. 6). Provides flexible credit for juniors and seniors who wish to undertake intensive study of a special problem in physical education. Offered S/U grade only. Prerequisites: junior status and 2.50 GPA.

4099 [PEPR 4099]. Student Teaching in Physical Education. 1‑16 (Max. 16). Student teaching is the culminating experience required of all students in teacher education for graduation and recommendation for certification. Consists of full-time assignment of 16 weeks in an approved school station in Wyoming under supervision of an experienced, approved supervising teacher. Offered for S/U grade only. Prerequisites: Completion of KIN 4012 and 4017; 2.5 GPA; consent of coordinator of student teaching in physical education.

4900. Topics in:___. 1-3 (Max. 9). The study of current topics not included in more formal course offerings in kinesiology and health. Prerequisite: KIN 3021.

5001. Short Course. 1-6 (Max. 6). Used for special topics in physical education on the basis of need. Each department in the college may make offerings under this number, the maximum allowable credit for each department is 6 semester hours. Offered satisfactory/unsatisfactory only. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5012. Curriculum Design in Physical Education. 3. Addresses current problems of curriculum design and development in physical education, including foundational concerns, curriculum anatomy (aims, goals, objectives, content, evaluation), and problems associated with design (scope, sequence, relevance, continuity, articulation, balance, and integration). Prerequisite: graduate standing, completion of a teacher certification program in physical education and teaching experience or permission of school.

5013. Spectrum of Teaching Styles. 3. Explores the range of teaching styles and the appropriateness of their uses. Cross listed with HLED 5013. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5014. Teaching Tactics in Sport-Based Physical Education. 3. Introduces students to the instructional strategy of the Tactical Games Approach (Mitchell, Oslin, & Griffin, 2006) of teaching sport-based activities in physical education.  Emphasis is on planning, implementing, assessing and evaluating the tactical approach within the K-12 physical education context. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5016. Analysis and Supervision of Teaching in Physical and Health Education. 3. Introduces various evaluative and supervisory techniques which are designed to improve teaching effectiveness and student learning. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing various strategies of evaluation in instructional settings. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5017. Research on Teaching Physical and Health Education. 3. Survey of techniques, paradigms, and findings of research on teaching. Cross listed with HLED 5017. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5018. Psychology of Teaching Physical Education. 3. Weaves together theory, research, and practical information related to the psychological aspects of teaching physical education. It shows how you can use psychological principles and strategies to manage behavior, motivate students, achieve program goals, and establish a positive learning environment. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Kinesiology and Health Masters program.

5020. Modalities and Administration in Athletic Training. 3. Emphasis on professional development and ability to research and compile information. Students will have opportunity to develop administrative skills related to the day-to-day operations of an athletic training room including budgeting, ordering, inventory, and facility maintenance. Students will develop an understanding of hiring practices within a healthcare facility. Prerequisites: Graduate level standing, NATA-BOC certification, and a Graduate Assistant Athletic Trainer in the Athletic Department.

5021. Pharmacology and Rehabilitation in Athletic Training. 3. Emphasis is on professional development and ability to research and disseminate information. Students will recognize and understand the pharmacokinetics of commonly prescribed medications in the athletic setting. Students will research injuries and develop rehabilitation programs to be presented to the athletic training staff and various medical providers within the community. Prerequisites: Graduate level standing, NATA-BOC certification, and a Graduate Assistant Athletic Trainer in the Athletic Department.

5022. Surgical Procedures and Post-operative Care. 3. Students will watch orthopedic surgeries and develop a sound understanding of common surgical techniques and procedures. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the anatomical structures, appropriate post-operative care, and rehabilitation techniques. Prerequisites: Graduate level standing, NATA-BOC certification, and a Graduate Assistant Athletic Trainer in the Athletic Department.

5023. Advanced Rehabilitation in Athletic Training. 3. Students will be provided opportunities to continue to increase their clinical evaluation skills and develop advanced rehabilitation protocols. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of using evidence based medicine and the ability to critically evaluate peer-reviewed research. Prerequisites: Graduate level standing, NATA-BOC certification, and a Graduate Assistant Athletic Trainer in the Athletic Department.

5024. Physical Activity Epidemiology. 3. This course will examine physical activity from a public health perspective. Topics include study design, critical appraisal of research, assessment of physical activity, relationships between physical activity and health outcomes, and current issues in physical activity epidemiology. Dual listed with KIN 4024. Prerequisite: KIN 3021.

5025. Exercise Physiology II. 2-4 (Max. 4). Provides interested students with an additional opportunity to study selected aspects of exercise physiology. Research and investigation are emphasized. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5029. Methods of Training and Conditioning. 3. Upper-level applied exercise training and conditioning course aimed at giving students the knowledge and experience needed to develop and lead exercise training programs. It will be of interest to teachers, coaches, and fitness leaders.  Dual listed with KIN 4029. Prerequisite: junior standing, KIN 3021 and a minimum 2.50 GPA.

5034. Lifespan Growth and Psychomotor Development. 3. Takes a scholarly approach to the subject of psychomotor development, with particular emphasis on the theoretical and scientific examination of motor behavior as it changes over time. Emphasis is placed on observing movement and analyzing changes in it. Prerequisites: graduate standing, KIN 3034 or equivalent.

5035. Sociology of Sport. 3. Study of the social aspects of sport and play. Includes concepts, research studies, and theories related to such topics as politics, economies, crowd behavior, religion, sexual identity and gender, and ethical and moral values related to sport. Prerequisites: graduate standing and a general sociology course.

5038. Advances in Research on Sport Expertise. 3. Examines the science behind skill acquisition in sport and explores the application of science to optimal training for achieving and retaining elite performance. Different theories will be compared to reveal how "perfection" is made by "practice." Prerequisites: graduate standing with experience of taking undergraduate courses in Motor Behavior, Cognitive Psychology, Sport Psychology, or Coaching.

5039. Perception and Action in Motor Skills. 3. For graduate students who have general interest in understanding how the human perceptual system is coping with the human action system in performing skilled motor tasks. An overview of the existing theories and studies in the field will be provided with sufficient breadth and depth. Prerequisite: undergraduate prerequisite course in one of the following areas: Motor Behavior (Motor Learning, Control, or Development); Cognitive Psychology; Human Biomechanics; Human Physiology.

5046. Applied Biomechanics and Programming. 3. Understand advanced biomechanical theories and utilize MATLAB programming to perform signal process and calculate 3-dimensional ground reaction force, center of pressure, electromyography, and 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional kinematics and kinetics. Emphasize on computational biomechanics and code writing in MATLAB. Prerequisite: KIN 3042, graduate standing.

5047. Research Biomechanics. 3. Designed to develop skills and techniques needed to conduct biomechanics research and the knowledge to better understand published research studies in biomechanics. Prerequisite: KIN 5045.

5056. Advanced Exercise Testing and Prescription. 4. Teaches foundational electrocardiography to perform graded exercise stress tests (GXT), performance GXTs to health and diseased populations based on a health appraisal assessment. Knowledge used to develop comprehensive exercise prescriptions, make metabolic calculations. Emphasis on how physical activity, nutrition/weight management, and behavioral factors interact with exercise programming. Dual listed with KIN 4056. Prerequisites: completion of KIN 3010 and 3021; 2.5 GPA; CPR certification.

5062. Applied Concepts in Human Aging. 3. Designed to integrate and apply concepts acquired in core KIN and HLED courses (e.g. human physiology, health promotion, etc.)  to the growing population of older/aging adults. Age-related pathologies are presented and discussed as is the scientific method. Dual listed with KIN 4062. Prerequisites:  KIN 3021; minimum 2.50 GPA; junior standing.

5080. Investigations in Kinesiology and Health. 1-3 (Max. 3). Designed to develop Master of Science level graduate students into critical consumers of research. An additional purpose is to develop research skills to the level necessary to complete a master of science Plan B paper. Cross listed with HLED 5080. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5085. Research Methods. 3. Focuses on methods and techniques for evaluating and conducting research. Potential and completed research problems are analyzed and evaluated. Research processes are reviewed with emphasis on application. Standards for writing literature reviews and research proposals are also emphasized. Prerequisite: admission to the UW Division of Kinesiology and Health's graduate program.

5090. Foundations of Coaching. 3. Coaches must be effective teachers, trainers, fund-raisers, recruiters, motivators, administrators, and counselors. The major purpose of this course is to provide future coaches with current information about the eight domains of essential coaching skills identified in the NSSC. These domains include philosophy and ethics, safety and injury prevention, physical conditioning, growth and development, teaching and communication, sport skills and tactics, organization and administration, and evaluation. Dual listed with KIN 4090. Prerequisite: graduate status.

5097. Individual Problems. 1-3 (Max. 6). Provides flexible credit for students who wish to undertake intensive study of a special problem identified in a regular class. Cross listed with HLED 5097. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5536. Sport Psychology. 3. Examines theoretical, research, and professional issues in contemporary sports psychology. Basic research design, including quasi-experimental design are covered, particularly to discuss the outcome studies or proposed applications such as imagery and hypnosis. Development of applied sport psychology and proposed interventions with sport behavior are viewed in relation to the development of these approaches, related training issues and outcome research. Identical to PSYC 5536. Prerequisites: graduate standing, sport or general psychology course, and consent of instructor.

5537. Exercise Psychology. 3. Focuses on key conceptual issues and research in exercise psychology and the application of research findings in a variety of physical activity settings. Specific content areas include psychological benefits of physical activity, exercise adherence, public health and exercise issues, theory, and determinants of physical activity, interventions for adoption and maintenance, and professional ethics. Prerequisites: graduate standing, KIN 3037.

5586. Seminar. 1-6 (Max. 8). Graduate students in kinesiology and health work intensively on current issues and problems, and may pursue specific areas of emphasis. Although a total of 8 hours is permitted under this number, only 6 hours are allowed by the Division of Kinesiology and Health toward a student's graduate program. Cross listed with HLED 5586. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5587. Special Problems. 1-6 (Max. 9). Provides a broad perspective through selected reading material and wherever possible the student collects and uses original information in practical school situations. All work is done independently under the direction of a faculty member. As many conferences are held as necessary to assure successful completion of the project. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and division director, graduate status.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3 (Max. 3). Work in classroom with a major professor. Expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5959. Enrichment Studies. 1-3 (Max. 99). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project.  Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate degree program.

5980. Dissertation Research. 1-12 (Max. 48). Graduate level course designed for students who are involved in research for their dissertation project.  Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their dissertation. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate degree program.

5990. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 24). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

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