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Physics (PHYS) (See also Astronomy )

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

1050. Concepts of Physics. 4. [S2<>SP] Introduces the physical world. For students whose background in math and science is minimal; recommended for students in paramedical sciences and medical technology. Three lecture hours per week are supplemented by two hours per week of laboratory work. Prerequisite: MATH 1000 or passing the Mathematics Placement Examination at Level 3. (Normally offered both semesters)

1090. The Fundamentals of the Physical Universe. 4. [S2<>SP] Applies fundamental principles of chemistry and physics to real life situations. Primarily for elementary education majors. Prerequisites: Math Level 3 or MATH 1000 and major in elementary education. (Normally offered fall, spring and summer)

1110. General Physics I. 4. [S2<>SP] First course of two-semester sequence. Introduces elementary college physics without calculus. Primarily for premedical, predental, preoptometry, prephysical therapy and other students requiring insight into workings of the physical world. Includes classical mechanics, gravitation and heat. Laboratory sessions will illustrate principles studied. Students receiving credit for PHYS 1110 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1050, 1210 or 1310. Prerequisite: MATH 1450, 1405 or equivalent. (Normally offered fall and summer semester)

1120. General Physics II. 4. [M3<>SP] Follows PHYS 1110 and completes introduction to physics without calculus. Includes electricity, magnetism, optics and modern physics. Laboratory sessions illustrate principles studied. Students receiving credit in PHYS 1120 cannot receive credit in PHYS 1050, 1220 or 1320. Prerequisite: PHYS 1110. (Normally offered spring and summer semester)

1210. Engineering Physics I. 4. [S2<>SP] First course of a two-semester sequence. Provides introduction to physics with calculus for engineering students. Includes classical mechanics, gravitation and mechanical waves. Laboratory sessions illustrate principles studied. Students receiving credit for PHYS 1210 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1050, 1110, or 1310. Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in MATH 2200 and concurrent enrollment in MATH 2205.

1220. Engineering Physics II. 4. [M3<>SP] Follows PHYS 1210 and continues introduction to physics with calculus for engineering students. Includes electricity, magnetism and heat. Laboratories illustrate principles studied. Students receiving credit for PHYS 1220 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1050, 1120, or 1320. Prerequisites: grades of C or higher in MATH 2200, 2205 and concurrent enrollment in MATH 2210.

1310. College Physics I. 4. [S2<>SP] First course of two semester sequence. Provides thorough introduction to physics with calculus. Primarily for majors in physics, astronomy, and other areas in science, mathematics and technology requiring the highest levels of sophistication. Includes classical mechanics, gravitation and mechanical waves. Laboratory sessions illustrate principles studied and meaning of physical measurement. Students receiving credit for PHYS 1310 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1050, 1110, or 1210. Prerequisites: MATH 2200 and concurrent enrollment in MATH 2205.

1320. College Physics II. 4. [M3<>SP] Follows PHYS 1310 and continues introduction to physics with calculus. Includes electricity, magnetism and thermodynamics. Laboratory sessions illustrate principles studied and meaning of physical measurement. Students receiving credit for PHYS 1320 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1050, 1120 or 1220. Prerequisites: MATH 2200, 2205 and concurrent enrollment in MATH 2210.

2150. The Physical Principles of Contemporary Social Problems. 3. [C2, G1<>(none)] Introduces technical basis of several important social problems including pollution, transportation, radiation, nuclear weapons and medical technology. Prerequisite: PHYS 1110 or consent of the instructor.

2250. Themodynamic Systems in Energy Science. 4. Introduces the principles of thermodynamics and their application to energy science. Intended for students majoring in Energry Resource Science. Prerequisites: PHYS 1210, grade of C or higher in MATH 2205.

2310. Physics III: Waves and Optics. 4. Third-semester course primarily for majors in physics, astronomy, engineering, mathematics, and other sciences. Includes Gaussian Optics and matrix calculations, wave equations, interference, superposition principle, elementary Fourier Analysis, Fraunhofer and Fresnel Diffraction, application to optical instruments. Prerequisite: PHYS 1220 or 1320 or equivalent.

2320. Physics IV: Modern Physics. 3. Fourth semester course primarily for majors in physics, astronomy, engineering, mathematics, and other physical sciences. Topics include introductory quantum mechanics, nuclear and particle physics, lasers, Planck's Blackbody Radiation, photoelectric effect, electron diffraction, wave-particle duality, deBroglie Wavelength, Bohr Atom, Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, Schrodinger Equation, and Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity. Prerequisite: PHYS 1220 or 1320 or equivalent. (Normally offered spring semester)

2330. Modern Physics Laboratory. 1. Provides experimental background needed by physics majors taking lecture course PHYS 2310. Students perform experiments crucial in birth of modern atomic and molecular physics, nuclear physics and solid-state physics. Prerequisites: PHYS 1320, MATH 2210, PHYS 2310 concurrently and physics or astronomy major.

2870. Special Topics in ____. 1-4 (Max. 4). Presents various subjects not available in regularly scheduled courses. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

3100. Application of Physics in the Modern World. 4. Presents a broad overview of physics concepts and their application to selected topics of current interest such as atmospheric pollution, nuclear radiation and medicine, and nuclear weapons. Prerequisite: 12 hours university-level biological, physical and/or earth sciences.

3640. Modern Electronics and Experimental Techniques. 4. Introduced to analog and digital circuits/devices and computer interfacing with laboratory equipment and experiments. Includes computer programming, the analysis of experimental data, and report writing. Apply the skills developed in this class to interface with and control representative instrumentation used in experimental physics laboratories. Prerequisites: PHYS 2320.

3650. Advanced Lab in Modern Physics and Electronics. 4. [W3<>(none)] Presents fundamentals of modern optics, modern and quantum physics, E&M/electronics, and thermodynamics in a project oriented interactive undergraduate laboratory with a focus on professional grade lab report writing that qualifies as WB USP. Students learn professional data handling, error theory, and data analysis. Prerequisites: WA and PHYS 2310 or 2320.

4000. Applied Laser Science. 3. Covers basic operational principles of lasers and their many applications in science and industry. Prerequisites: PHYS 2310 or equivalent; PHYS 4310. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4210. Classical Mechanics I. 3. First semester of a two-course sequence. Presents classical mechanics at intermediate level. Begins with elementary Newtonian mechanics and builds step by step into analytic mechanics. Includes simple harmonic motion of particles in one, two or three dimensions, gravitation; introduction to rigid-body motion; and introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics. Prerequisites: PHYS 2310 or equivalent, MATH 2210 or equivalent. (Normally offered spring semester)

4220. Classical Mechanics II. 4. Follows PHYS 4210. Presents classical mechanics at an intermediate to advanced level. Includes detailed treatment of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics, rigid-body motion, small oscillations and introduction to relativity. Dual listed with PHYS 5220. Prerequisite: PHYS 4210.

4310. Quantum Mechanics. 3. Studies fundamental concepts of quantum theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 4210. (Normally offered fall semester)

4340. Semiconductor Materials and Devices. 3. Physical properties of semiconductor materials and devices, including crystal lattices and energy bands, carrier generation, transport, and recombination. PN, metal-semiconductor, and heterojunction operation. Field Effect Transistors, including Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOSFET), Junction (JFET), MEtal Semiconductor (MESFET), and High Electron Mobility (HEMT) transistors. Bipolar Junction (BJT) and Heterojunction (HBT) Transistor operation. Cross listed with EE 4340. Prerequisite: PHYS 1220 or 1320.

4350. Advanced Quantum Mechanics. 3. Covers advanced topics in quantum mechanics, including angular momentum, quantum states in three dimension, hydrogen atomic structure, electron spin, Pauli matrices, time-dependent and independent perturbation methods, Born approximation, formal scattering theory, etc.. Prerequisites: PHYS 4210, 4310, 4420 and MATH 4440. (Normally offered spring semester)

4410. Electricity and Magnetism I. 3. First semester of a two-course sequence. Presents electricity and magnetism on intermediate level, emphasizing fields. Begins with review of vector algebra and calculus and proceeds to discussion of electrostatics, potential theory and steady currents. Prerequisites: PHYS 2310 or equivalent and MATH 2210. (Normally offered fall semester)

4420. Electricity and Magnetism II. 3. Follows PHYS 4410 and continues intermediate discussion of electricity and magnetism. Covers magnetstatics, magnetoquasistatics, alternating currents, electromagnetic waves, transmission lines and antennae. Prerequisite: PHYS 4410. (Normally offered spring semester)

4510. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. 3. Presents fundamental principles of thermodynamics, emphasizing mathematical development. Prerequisites: PHYS 4310 or equivalent and MATH 2210.

4690. Science: Fact, Fiction and Future. 3. [(none)<>CH, WC] Examines a number of concepts related to the scientific method. How science "works" is investigated within six topic areas: What is Science?, The Nature of the Scientific Method, Science Fact?, Science Fiction, Science of the Future and Case Studies of the Application of the Scientific Method. Prerequisites: completion of at least one lower-division science course and successful completion of a WB course or permission of instructor.

4710. Solid-State Physics. 3. Surveys theory and application of solid state physics using quantum theory. Emphasizes relation between theory and experiment. Discusses areas of present research activity. Prerequisites: PHYS 4310 and 4510.

4830. Mathematical and Computational Physics I. 3. First semester of a two-semester sequence. Provides a comprehensive overview of mathematical physics and numerous analytical mathematical techniques applied to physics problems. Topics include: numerical computations and visualizations, differential and integral vector analysis, linear algebra, infinite series, complex variables, partial differential equations, ordinary differential equations, integral transforms and equations, and calculus of variations. Prerequisites: PHYS 2310 or PHYS 2320 and MATH 2210.

4840. Mathematical and Computational Physics II. 3. Second semester of a two-semester course. Provides a comprehensive overview of computational physics and provides numerous numerical techniques applied to physics problems. Topics include: numerical computations and visualizations, numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations, linear systems, curve fitting, discrete Fourier transforms, partial differential equations, integration, and Monte Carlo simulations of general stochastic systems. Prerequisite: PHYS 4830.

4860. Independent Study in _____. 1‑6 (Max. 12). Encompasses independent study to advanced problems which may involve either library and/or laboratory research. Prerequisite: PHYS 2310. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4870. Special Topics in _____. 1‑6 (Max. 12). Presents various subjects not available in regularly scheduled courses. Prerequisites: PHYS 2310 and consent of instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4970. Senior Research/Internship. 1-3 (Max. 4). Requires a practical research experience or internship from the student up to 4 credits under the advisement of a faculty member. This requirement for graduation should lead to a professional publication or document written by the student. The credit requirements may be spread over several semesters.

5110. Methods of Theoretical Physics I. 4. First semester of a two-semester sequence which introduces mathematical techniques used in graduate physics courses. The content may be adjusted to meet the needs of the students. This course is required for M.S. and Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: PHYS 4310, PHYS 4410, MATH 4440 or equivalent.

5120. Methods of Theoretical Physics II. 4. Designed to follow PHYS 5110 and will introduce further mathematical techniques used in graduate physics courses. Required for M.S. and Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: PHYS 5110.

5210. Classical Mechanics. 4. Advanced classical dynamics beginning with classical Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalism, covering relativistic Lagrangian formulation, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, and small oscillations. A required course for Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: PHYS 4220, MATH 4440 or equivalent, and concurrent registration in PHYS 5110.

5220. Classical Mechanics II. 4. Presents classical mechanics at an intermediate to advanced level and is designed to follow PHYS 4210. Includes a detailed treatment of Langrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Rigid-body motion, small oscillations, and an introduction to relativity. Dual listed with PHYS 4220. Prerequisite: PHYS 4210.

5230. Advanced Classical Mechanics. 4. The developments of the 1970s and 1980s, including a major expansion in our understanding of chaotic motion in many areas of science, will be brought together in a coherent framework. A strong computational component will be associated with many of the problems studied. Prerequisite: PHYS 4210 and 5220 or equivalent.

5310. Quantum Theory I. 4. First semester of a two-semester sequence which presents quantum mechanics on a professional level. Includes topics such as infinite dimensional vector spaces, postulates of quantum mechanics, exactly soluble bound systems, and angular momentum. Required for M.S. and Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: PHYS 4220, PHYS 4310, MATH 4440 or equivalent, concurrent registration in PHYS 5110.

5320. Quantum Theory II. 4. Designed to follow PHYS 5310 and will present topics such as scattering by a potential, addition of angular momentum, stationary and time dependent perturbation, identical particles. It is required for M.S. and Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: PHYS 5310 and concurrent registration in PHYS 5120.

5410. Electromagnetic Theory I. 4. The first semester of a two-semester sequence which presents electromagnetic theory on a professional level. The classical analytic solutions of the equations of motion are discussed and expressed as quadratures over the Green functions with attention to effect of boundary conditions. It presents topics such as algebra and calculus of vectors in configuration space, electrostatics, potential theory, and steady currents. Required for M.S. and Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: PHYS 4420, PHYS 5110, MATH 4440 or equivalent.

5420. Electromagnetic Theory II. 4. Designed to follow PHYS 5410 and will present topics such as magnetostatics, magnetoquasistatics, time dependent electromagnetic theory, physical optics with a vector field, and radiation from antennae. Required for Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: PHYS 5410.

5510. Statistical Mechanics. 4. An introduction to statistical mechanics and the many-body problem, including quantum statistics. Required for Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: PHYS 5210, 5320, 5410.

5550. Advanced Statistical Mechanics. 3. A study of modern calculational techniques in the many-body theory of liquids and solids, and an introduction to nonequilibrium processes. Prerequisite: PHYS 5520.

 

5610. Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy. 3. A quantum mechanical treatment of atomic and molecular structure, transition probabilities, selection rules, and the Zeeman and Stark effects. Prerequisite: PHYS 5320.

5720. Advanced Solid State Physics. 3. A course in modern topics and theoretical technique relevant to condensed matter. Prerequisite: PHYS 4710 or equivalent, PHYS 5510.

5730. Condensed Matter Magnetism. 4. Designed to give graduate students instruction in the fundamental principles of magnetism, the important properties of magnetic materials and their applications. Required for the physics track of the PhD program. Prerequisites: PHYS 4310, 4410, 4510 or equivalent.

5740. Transport Properties of Solids. 4. Instruction in the basic quantum theories of electron and phonon transport, interactions among the carriers and with impurities, and important transport phenomena in various systems. Required for the physics track students in the PhD program. Prerequisites: PHYS 4310, 4410, 4510 or equivalent.

5750. Optical Properties of Solids. 4. Covers advanced topics of optical properties of solids, including free carrier contribution to their optical properties, interband transitions, absorption of light in solids, luminescence and photoconductivity, electron spectroscopy and surface science, light emitting diodes, etc. Prerequisites: PHYS 4310, 4410, 4510 or equivalent.

5770. Nanotechnology: Nanophysics and Nanosystems. 4. Introduction to nanoscale fabrication techniques including lithography, pattern transfer, thin film deposition etc. Electronic transport in mesoscopic systems. Electrical properties of nanoscale devices including self-assembled monolayers, carbon nanotubes, and semiconductor nanowires. Noise properties of nanostructures. Prerequisites: PHYS 4310 or equivalent.

5780. Modern Computational Methods in Solids. 4. Introduces students to a series of physical problems in condensed matter. This course is an extension of introductory condensed matter, with extra degrees of complexity that necessitate numerical techniques and advanced computational approaches to obtain solutions. Prerequisites: graduate standing.

5810. Nuclear and Elementary Particle Physics. 3. An advanced course in nuclear and elementary particle interactions, with emphasis on current development. Prerequisite: PHYS 5350.

5820. Plasma Physics. 4. Introduction to plasma physics is exhibited through the analysis of numerous ionized environments (fusion systems, stellar surfaces, and the ionosphere).  Fluid approximations (MHD), as well as a kinetic theory formulation (including the Vlasov equation) of plasma physics will be employed.  Damping, instabilities, and nonlinear plasmas will be explored. Prerequisites: PHYS 4210 and PHYS 4420.

5830. Physics of Solar Cells. 4. Covers problems of energy economy, photon physics, physics of semiconductors, conversion of chemical energy into electrical energy, basic structure of solar cells, quantum-dot-semiconductor solar cells, limitations of energy conversions in solar cells, and strategies for higher efficiency. Prerequisite: PHYS 5720.

5840. Experimental Methods and Low Temperature. 4. Introduction to experimental methods in condensed matter physics and phenomena at low temperatures.  The fields of solid properties at low temperatures, the generation and measurement of low temperatures, the generation of high magnetic fields in laboratory magnets, and basic vacuum technology are covered. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5860. Independent Study. 1-4 (Max. 8). Designed to provide opportunities for self-study and special projects under supervision of individual professors.

5870. Special Topics In Physics. 1-4 (Max. 10). Intended to accommodate various subjects not offered as regular courses. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3 (Max. 3). Work in classroom with a major professor. Expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5959. Enrichment Studies. 1-3 (Max. 99). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate degree program.

5980. Dissertation Research. 1-12 (Max. 48). Designed for students who are involved in research for their dissertation project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their dissertation. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate level degree program.

5990. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 24). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

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