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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Psychology (PSYC)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

1000. General Psychology. 3. [C2<>CS] Surveys the field of psychology through lectures, class discussion and assigned readings. Includes development of behavior, physiological mechanisms of behavior, perception, motivation and emotion, learning, intelligence, individuality and personality and mental health.

1001. Issues in Psychology. 1. [(none)<>I, L] Students debate and analyze controversial topics confronting psychologists, thereby gaining a better understanding of the varieties of work done by psychologists, as well as a better understanding of the methods psychologists use to advance the date of knowledge in the field. Prerequisites: PSYC 1000 or concurrent enrollment.

1111. Psychology and Social Justice. 3. [(none)<>I] Examines the field of political psychology, the study of how individuals behave in the context of policy-making, supporting leaders and causes, and voting. Particular emphasis is placed on social justice in democratic systems, such as the persistence of inequalities based on race, gender, and social class.

2000. Research Psychological Methods. 4. [W2<>WB] Introduces students to some of the methods of investigating psychological questions. Exposes students to various research strategies ranging from observational to experimental, using representative laboratory exercises, lectures, readings, films and demonstrations. Requires written and oral reports. May be used to satisfy department's written and oral communication requirement for majors. Laboratory two hours per week. Prerequisites: PSYC 1000, ENGL WA, STAT 2050 or 2070.

2080. Biological Psychology. 3. Introduces biological bases of behavior. Includes ethology and comparative behavior, psychobiological development, physiological and sensory mechanisms of behavior, and evolution and behavioral genetics. Presents basic structural and functional properties of the nervous system. Prerequisites: PSYC 1000 and general biology. (Normally offered fall semester)

2210. Drugs and Behavior. 3. Surveys drugs which affect behavior, emphasizing drugs with abuse potential. Includes brief introduction to the chemistry of the brain and how drugs may have their effects. Discusses behavioral, social, historical and medical aspects of each major class of psychoactive drugs. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

2220 [2200]. Infant Development. 3. [C2, W2<>(none)] Examines aspects of development of the human organism in the first three years of life. Examines theories, research and issues relating to infant development. Includes motor, perceptual, physical, cognitive, emotional and social development. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

2300. Developmental Psychology. 3. Explores development and behavior of children from conception to adolescence, emphasizing major roles played by maturation and learning. Acquaints students with the area of child study in terms of research findings, theories of child development and present problems. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000. (Normally offered spring semester)

2310. Exceptional Children. 2. Studies behavior, mental processes and developmental patterns of atypical children, the physically handicapped, the gifted, the mentally retarded and children with neurological and psychological disturbances. Students will not be allowed credit in PSYC 2310 if PSYC 4310 is taken. Prerequisite: 4 hours in psychology. (Offered at Wyoming community colleges)

2330. Psychology of Adjustment. 3. Brings students to an understanding of more common problems of personal adjustment in terms of general psychology principles. Students may not receive credit in both PSYC 2330 and previously offered PSYC 633. Prerequisite: 4 hours in psychology. (Offered at Wyoming community colleges)

2340 [4340]. Abnormal Psychology. 3. Provides a general overview of abnormal behavior, emphasizing types, etiology and treatment methods. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000. (Normally offered spring semester)

2380 [4755]. Social Psychology. 3. Examines how peoples' thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the presence of others.  Course will cover a broad range of theories and research in social psychology.  PSYC 1000.  (Normally offered fall semester)

3120 [4120]. Cognitive Psychology. 3. Deals with higher mental processes that are primarily unique to human beings from theoretical and research orientations. Emphasizes interrelationships between various cognitive processes and continuity of those processes with perceptual and non-cognitive activities. Discusses how information is processed and remembered. Prerequisite: 6 hours in psychology, including PSYC 1000. (Offered spring semester)

3150. Moral Development. 3. [C2<>(none)] Students explore the vast psychological literature on moral development in affect, cognition and behavior from infancy to adulthood. Topics covered include major developmental theories, research methodologies, current scientific knowledge and its relationship to issues of cultural diversity, social policy and education. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000, junior/senior standing or consent of the instructor.

3160 [4160]. Learning and Behavior. 3. Learning focuses on how our experiences affect how we think, feel, and behave.  Reviews major theoretical approaches to learning which derive from animal and human research.  Discusses applications of learning principles to understanding current behavior, teaching and maintaining new behavior, and eliminating unwanted behavior. Prerequisite: 6 hours in psychology.

3250. Health Psychology. 3. Provides overview of growing partnership between psychology and health care, including history of psychology in health care; theoretical foundations of health and illness; intervention and research techniques; stress and high risk behaviors (e.g., substance abuse, eating behaviors, AIDS); psychology's contribution to improving outcomes and quality of life in chronic and life-threatening behaviors. Cross listed with NURS 3250. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 or consent of instructor.

3300. Gender Development. 3. Examines the development of gender roles and sex differences. Incorporates developmental, clinical and social psychological perspectives. Includes examination of biological, social and cultural factors on gender development; conceptualizations of masculinity, femininity and androgyny; differences in play behavior in boys and girls; evaluation of psychological measurement and research regarding gender development and sex differences. Cross listed with WMST 3300. Prerequisite: PSYC 2300 or 4300 or FCSC 2121 or EDST 2450.

3390 [4390]. Theories of Personality. 3. Intensively studies major theoretical approaches to explanation of personality, as well as historical trends that culminated in the theories. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 and PSYC 2300 or PSYC 2340 or 2380.

4050. Experimental Psychology. 4. [W3<>WC] Through lecture and laboratory students are acquainted with experimental methods in psychological research. Prerequisites: PSYC 2000, STAT 2050 or STAT 2070, and 20 hours in psychology.

4060. History and Systems of Psychology. 3. Deals with history of the ideas that led to present science of psychology. Emphasizes the origins of modern psychology within the context of nineteenth century science. Discusses philosophical origins of modern psychology. Prerequisite: 9 hours in psychology.

4070. Motivation. 3. Studies motivation concerning both humans and non-human animals, emphasizing humans. Discusses the physiological basis of motivation in some detail. Considers emotion as primarily a motivational state. Covers psychodynamic and personality factors with regard to the human. Prerequisite: 6 hours in psychology.

4080. Physiological Psychology. 4. [(none)<>SB] Examines physiological mechanisms of behavior, strongly emphasizing neural and hormonal processes. Includes fundamentals of neuroanatomy and evolution of the nervous system, basic neurophysiology, sensory and motor processes, as well as the physiology of emotion, motivation, learning and memory. Lecture three hours per week. Laboratory two hours per week. Prerequisites: 6 hours in psychology; and LIFE 1000 or 1010 or an introductory zoology course.

4090. Comparative Psychology. 4. Studies unicellular organisms, plants and animals with special reference to principles of behavior common to all. Discusses dependence of behavior on structure, particularly neuromuscular and sensory mechanisms in animals, and its variability and modifiability. Emphasizes phylogenetic and ontogenetic development of nervous systems and behavior systems. Lecture three hours per week. Laboratory two hours per week. Prerequisite: 6 hours in psychology.

4110. Sleep and Dreams. 3. Focuses on psychological data of sleep and dreams, as well as implications for the field of contemporary research. Particular attention given to subjective phenomena during sleep and to recent studies of the nature, meaning and function of dreams. Prerequisite: 6 hours in psychology.

4150. Cognitive Development. 3. Examines cognitive development from infancy to adolescence. Explores, through lecture, discussion and projects, major theories and current empirical research on cognitive development, as well as implications for social and educational policies concerning children. Prerequisite: 9 hours in psychology, including child psychology course.

4200. Sensation and Perception. 3. Examines behavioral and physiological processes involved in sensation and perception. Discusses each of the sensory systems, emphasizing their physiology and role in perceptual processing. Prerequisite: 6 hours in psychology.

4220. Psychopharmacology. 3. [W3<>WC] Studies behavioral and conscious effects of drugs and drug use in treatment of psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 2340. Dual listed with PSYC 5220.

4250. Psychological Aspects of Chronic Illness. 3. Investigates the impact of chronic physical illnesses on diagnosed children and adults, their families, and society. Emphasizes effects of illnesses on psychological adaptation and quality of life. Should be of particular interest to helping professionals and health care workers. Prerequisites: PSYC 1000 and 3250.

4300. Adolescent Development. 3. Examines the developmental changes that occur during adolescence.  Considers physical and physiological growth; intellectual, cognitive, academic and vocational development, changes in attitudes, interests and activities; and development of interpersonal relationships. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000. 

4310. Developmental Psychopathology. 3. Provides basic understanding of developmental psychopathology. Examines characteristics, etiology, assessment and treatment of psychological disorders in children including autism, mental retardation, anxiety, depression, attention, learning, and conduct problems. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 and PSYC 2300 or FCSC 2121 or EDST 2450.

4320. Intellectual Disability. 3. Acquaints students will all aspects of intellectual disability including assessment, diagnosis and classification, etiology, and associated health and mental health difficulties. Prevention, educational and psychological intervention, family adaptation, and community involvement are also addressed. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 and PSYC 2300 or 4300 or FCSC 2121 or EDST 2450.

4350. Psychology of Adulthood. 3. Examines theories and research on psychological development from early adulthood to the end of life, with special emphasis on positive development, successful aging, and methodological issues in the study of adult development.   Prerequisite: PSYC 1000.

4370. Criminal Psychopathology. 3. Provides an overview of current theories and empirical evidence concerning relationship between psychological disorder and criminal behavior. Examines various clinical syndromes and their role in biological, social and psychological genesis of crime, as well as the concept of criminal responsibility. Cross listed with CRMJ 4370. Prerequisite: 6 hours in psychology.

4380. Death and Dying. 3. Designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the  field of thanatology. Death is considered from both an individual and sociocultural perspective.  Aims to provide solid ground in research, methods, and theory of end-of-life issues and to encourage contemplation of personal and professional applications of death studies.  Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 and junior/senior standing.

4400. Principles of Psychological Testing. 3. Encompasses basic concepts, principles and procedures of psychological testing, with a lecture, discussion, laboratory project approach. Emphasizes nature and uses of test reliability, validity, norms and transformations, selecting and evaluating tests, test interpretation models and professional ethics in test use. Lecture three hours per week. Prerequisites: 12 hours in psychology and STAT 2050 or 2070.

4500. Introduction to Clinical Psychology. 3. Provides students with general introduction to clinical psychology as a subarea of psychology. Deals with the search for, and applications of, psychological principles and methods aimed at assessing and explaining unique or special problems of the individual, group or family, assisting client(s) to function more meaningfully and effectively, and helping to prevent future problems. Prerequisite: 12 hours in psychology, including PSYC 2340.

4730. Psychology and Law. 3. Exposes students to the application of psychological principles to problems in law. Emphasizes the American trial system, correction systems and civil commitment. Cross listed with CRMJ 4730. Prerequisite: 12 hours in psychology.

4740. Advanced Social Psychology. 3. [(none)<>WC] Concentrates on critical assessment of interpersonal behavior. Students are expected to become familiar with data gathering, analysis and reporting procedures commonly used in contemporary social psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 2000 and PSYC 2380.

4760. Child Maltreatment. 3. [C2<>(none)] Lecture and seminar course. Examines the phenomenon of child abuse and neglect. Includes an overview of attitudes towards and legal definitions of child maltreatment. Explores parental factors, contextual influences and developmental consequences of maltreatment. Relies heavily on current research in child abuse and neglect. Emphasizes policy implications. Cross listed with CRMJ 4760 Prerequisite: 6 hours in psychology.

4820. Psychology of Human Sexuality. 3. Encompasses a clinical-personality orientation to psychological factors in the development and expression of human sexuality. Focuses on the individual: interactions of physiological factors with developmental influences and personality patterns that produce feelings, thoughts and behaviors associated with human sexuality. Prerequisite: PSYC 1000 and 2300 or FCSC 2121 or EDST 2450. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4830. Senior Thesis. 3. [W3<>WC] Senior research project under faculty guidance and supervision. Faculty sponsorship must be obtained prior to registration. Prerequisites: senior standing, majors only, 27 hours in psychology, PSYC 4050 or consent of instructor. (Normally offered each semester)

4850. Field Work in Psychology. 1-3 (Max. 6). Provides students with new opportunities to experience applied aspects of psychology in real world settings through volunteering, internship, teaching, and related activities. Type and location of experience, and requirements for earning credit and for grading, are determined with a sponsoring faculty person in the psychology department. Preparation of an acceptable report on the work done is essential. No credit is available for field work prior to registration for this course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor required in advance.

4855. Undergraduate Research in Psychology. 1-3 (Max. 6). Provides students with new opportunities to assist in aspects of conducting basic and applied psychological research with a sponsoring faculty person in the psychology department. Specific research activities and requirements for earning credit and for grading are determined with a sponsoring psychology faculty person. Preparation of an acceptable report on the work done is essential. No credit is available for research conducted prior to registration for this course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor required in advance.

4860. Seminar. 1-6 (Max. 6). Small group meetings for extended discussions of particular topics in psychology, generally one topic for the entire semester. Students prepare thorough reports on an aspect of the topic and present this as basis for group discussion. Topics vary from semester to semester. There is no textbook for the seminar, but students are expected to make extensive use of the library. Prerequisites: 9 hours in psychology and consent of instructor.

4960. Service-Learning in Psychology. 3. Experience applied aspects of psychology in real world settings through volunteering. Recent research and other materials preparing students for their service will be discussed in class. After the volunteering experience, the students will prepare an academic paper integrating their practical experience with research and theory learned in class. Cross listed with SOWK 4960. Prerequisites: PSYC 1000 and consent of instructor required in advance.

5060. Statistical Methods In Psychology. 3. General statistical analyses and their application to psychology. Analysis of variance, regression and correlation methods are studied from a data analytic perspective, emphasizing the conceptual understanding of where and when these techniques should be used and the interpretation of their results. Available computer programs will be utilized. Credit cannot be earned in more that one of the following courses: STAT 2020, 3050, 5050, 5060, 5070, 5080. Cross listed with STAT 5060. Prerequisite: 1 course in statistics (all introductory courses except 2000).

5095. Statistical Computation In Psychology. 1-3 (Max. 12). Supervised problem-solving practice in statistical analysis is provided with regard to topics corresponding to those covered in a concurrent statistical analysis course. Statistical analysis topics vary. Prerequisites: graduate standing and instructor consent.

5115. Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Seminar. 3. Advanced professional course for students interested in current trends and issues in early childhood development. Interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from research in communication disorders, kinesiology and health, elementary and early childhood education and special education, child and family studies, nursing, and psychology. Cross listed with FCSC, EDEC, NURS, HLED, SPPA 5115. Prerequisite: graduate status.

5120. Neuropsychology of Human Behavior. 3. Brain mechanisms involved in the expression and control of human behavior will be studied. Findings from classical neuropsychological studies and more recent clinical research investigations will be used in deriving explanations for the structural and physiological basis of normal and abnormal psychological processes. Prerequisite: 9 hours in psychology.

5140. Personality Science. 3. Examines contemporary scientific research and theory in personality. Surveys the biological, cognitive, affective, social, and interpersonal determinants of personality function with individual differences. A theoretical framework highlights the dynamic transactions between individuals and the sociocultural environment over the life course. Prerequisite: graduate standing in clinical or experimental psychology.

5180. Advanced Developmental Psychology. 3. Provides a graduate-level overview of development psychology, including current theories, issues, and research in both cognitive development and social development. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5210. Advanced Physiological Psychology. 3. Examines the physiological bases of behavior beginning with a treatment of basic neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and pharmacology. Discussion then proceeds to the physiological correlates of various behavioral states including sleep arousal, sensory processes, motor control, motivational systems, emotions, learning and memory. Prerequisite: 30 hours in psychology including PSYC 4080.

5220. Psychopharmacology. 3. Examines clinical psychopharmacology, the science and practice of using drugs to treat psychological disorders. Dual listed PSYC 4220. Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor.

5230. Advanced Cognitive Psychology. 3. Provides the graduate student with an understanding of theoretical and experimental approaches to the study of human cognitive processing. There is an emphasis on critical evaluation of current research in the area. Prerequisite: 30 hours in psychology including PSYC 3120.

5270. Behaviorism. 3. Acquaints the graduate student with behaviorist philosophy, the experimental analysis of behavior, and the application of behavioral technology to experimental, educational, and clinical problems. Prerequisite: 30 hours in psychology.

5300. Applied Multivariate Anlysis. 3. The application of multivariate statistical methods in behavioral science research. Topics include multivariate regression, canonical correlation, discriminate analysis, factor analysis and multidimension scaling. A wide range of computer assistance is incorporated. Cross listed with STAT 5300. Prerequisite: STAT 5050.

5320. Child and Family Therapy. 3. Designed for graduate students in clinical psychology who already possess adequate background knowledge of child psychopathology and diagnostic skills. Emphasis is on theory and techniques of individual psychotherapy with children and on theories of family therapy. Prerequisite: PSYC 5500 and consent of instructor.

5330. Introduction To Clinical Practicum. 1. Provides an introduction to psychotherapy and to the Psychology Clinic for first year doctoral students by having them observe a therapy case in the Psychology Clinic and receive instruction from an advanced doctoral student as to therapeutic techniques and client dynamics. Prerequisite: admission to the doctoral program in clinical psychology and permission of instructor.

5340. Introduction To Clinical Supervision. 1-4 (Max. 4). Provides an introduction to the supervision of psychotherapy for advanced doctoral students by having them observe a therapy case in the Psychology Clinic with assigned first year doctoral students and then give instruction as to therapeutic techniques used by the therapist and to client dynamics. Prerequisite: admission to the doctoral program in clinical psychology and consent of instructor.

5370. Graduate Seminar in Forensic Psychology. 3. To provide graduate level training in forensic psychology for students pursuing careers in psychology, counseling and criminal justice. Prerequisite: 16 hours in psychology or consent of instructor.

5375. Psychology/Law Proseminar. 1-10 (Max. 10). The Psychology Law Proseminar exposes students to various areas of psycholegal research. Topics will vary each semester and students will be expected be actively engaged in the proseminar activities. Students will be exposed to theoretical and applied research that has relevance to legal settings. Prerequisites: graduate standing in Psychology and permission of instructor.

5380. Theories and Techniques of Psycotherapy. 3. For entering clinical doctoral students. Major current psychotherapies are reviewed in terms of theoretical assumptions and related techniques. Required of first-year students in the program. Prerequisite: admission to doctoral program in clinical psychology.

5400. Clinical Assessment I. 3. First semester of a three semester practicum course in psychological assessment at the doctoral level. During the semesters, extensive examination is made regarding the standardization, relevant application, and significant limitations of assessment techniques. A thorough grounding is interpretation, and communication of the results of psychological evaluation both in writing and in consultation with referral sources. Normally taken during the first year of the doctoral program. Prerequisite: restricted to doctoral students in clinical psychology.

5410. Clinical Assessment II. 3. Second semester of a full-year practicum course in psychological assessment at the doctoral level. Prerequisite: PSYC 5400.

5420. Clinical Assessment III. 3. Presents the clinical psychologist in training with an introduction to the clinical application of neuropsychological principles and various assessment tools. Includes the administration and interpretation of neuropsychological instruments and batteries, as well as the integration of more traditional assessment techniques with neuropsychological testing. Prerequisite: admission to the clinical psychology doctoral program and PSYC 5410.

5425. Diagnostic Interviewing. 1. Students review research on diagnostic interviews, practice basic interviewing skills and learn to administer the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I) using training tapes, class discussion and role-play exercises. As time permits, other interviews used to assess personality disorders and specific diagnostic categories will be reviewed. Prerequisite: admission to the doctoral program in clinical psychology.

5430. Clinical Neuropsychological Assessment. 3. Present the clinical psychologist in training with an introduction to the clinical application of neuropsychological principles and various tools. Includes the administration and interpretation of neuropsychological instruments and batteries, as well as the integration of more traditional assessment techniques with neuropsychological testing. Prerequisite: admission to the clinical doctoral psychology program, PSYC 5400, 5410, and 5120.

5440. Behavior Analysis and Therapy. 3. A seminar in behavior analysis and therapy designed to acquaint the student with literature on radical behaviorism and behavior analysis and to develop skills in the use of techniques based on learning principles. Prerequisite: admission to doctoral program in clinical psychology and consent of instructor.

5450. Clinical Practicum. 1-4 (Max. 8). Beginning clinical practicum course providing doctoral students in clinical psychology with supervised experience in individual psychotherapy. Psychodynamic, client-centered, and behavioral techniques are employed. Cases and theoretical issues discussed in weekly seminar. Individual supervision of students by clinical faculty. Prerequisite: admission to doctoral program in clinical psychology and consent of instructor.

5460. Advanced Clinical Practicum. 1-12 (Max. 12). Advanced clinical practicum course for students beyond their second year in the doctoral program in clinical psychology. Provides additional supervised experience in individual, family, child, and group therapy, as well as in psychological assessment. Experiences include case conceptualization, case management, and provision of direct services. Prerequisite: admission to doctoral program in clinical psychology, PSYC 5450, and consent of instructor.

5470. Empirically Supported Psychotherapies. 3. Students become familiar with the efficacy and effectiveness of important state-of-the-art treatments with a focus on treatments of mood and anxiety disorders. Course goals include gaining a critical understanding of the issues involved in identifying psychological treatments that work. Prerequisite: PSYC 5380; PSYC 5510.

5500. Psychopathology I. 3. PSYC 5500 and 5510 are a two-semester sequence of courses designed to provide in-depth knowledge of the etiology, classification, clinical description and course of psychopathology from a developmental, life span, perspective (infancy to old age). Psychological science, including a biopsychosocial approach, are emphasized, as well as issues involved in diagnostic systems. Prerequisite: admission to the doctoral program in clinical psychology.

5510. Psychopathology II. 3. PSYC 5500 and 5510 are a two-semester sequence of courses designed to provide in-depth knowledge of the etiology, classification, clinical description and course of psychopathology from a developmental, life span, perspective (infancy to old age). Psychological science, including a biopsychosocial approach, are emphasized, as well as issues involved in diagnostic systems. Prerequisite: admission to the doctoral program in clinical psychology.

5515. Introduction to Scientist/Practitioner Training. 2. Acquaints first-year clinical doctoral students with the science-practitioner model for the practice of clinical psychology. Emphasis is on integrating science and practice. Focus is also on the crucial role of the scientist-practitioner in our emerging behavioral healthcare system. Prerequisite: entry into Clinical Doctoral Program.

5520. Introduction To Research. 3. Introduction to problems and issues in research methodology. Ongoing research directed by various faculty are used as paradigms for conceptualization of research problems. Students critically evaluate projects presented and begin planning for research leading to theses and dissertations. Prerequisite: graduate status in psychology.

5530. Ethical Issues in the Practice of Psychology. 1 (Max 2). Informs and sensitizes the student to ethical issues, precedents, practices, and legal issue in the practice of psychology and in research. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology.

5550. Clinical Seminar. 1-3 (Max. 18). Graduate level seminar in clinical psychology, the topic of which will vary from semester to semester. Emphasis is on providing students with an in-depth analysis of some specific area of clinical psychology. Prerequisite: admission to the doctoral program in clinical psychology.

5630. Clinical Supervised Practicum I. 2. The first semester of a one year practicum in clinical supervision for doctoral students in clinical psychology. Students supervise at least one 2nd or 3rd year clinical doctoral student, attend supervision team meetings, and may conduct group supervision and/or see clients as determined by team leader. Prerequisites: enrollment in doctoral program in clinical psychology.

5640. Practicum in Clinical Supervision II. 2. The second semester of a one year practicum in clinical supervision for doctoral students in clinical psychology. Students supervise at least one 2nd or 3rd year clinical doctoral student, attend supervision team meetings, and may conduct group supervision and/or see clients as determined by team leader. Prerequisite: enrollment in doctoral program in clinical psychology.

5650. Theories of Social Psychology. 3. Designed to give the student a thorough understanding of the theories and methodologies of contemporary Social Psychology. Prerequisite: 16 hours in psychology including PSYC 2380.

5670. Group Theory and Process in Psychotherapy. 3. Theory and practice of group psychotherapy. Enrollment requires that students be willing to learn from both objective research of experts and their own subjective experiences in the training-group lab experience. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5685. Neurophysiology. 4. Designed to investigate the structure and function of nervous systems, drawing information from both vertebrate and invertebrate organisms. Topics such as sensory systems, motor coordination and central integrative mechanisms will be covered in addition to the basic neurophysiology of nerve cells. The laboratory complements the lecture sequence. Prerequisite: one course in physiology, chemistry, physics.

5720. Advanced Social Development. 3. Provides a graduate-level introduction to theory and empirical research on social development. Topics include emotional development, attachment, socialization, moral development, aggression, and social context. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5740. Internship in Clinical Psychology. 1. (Max. 3). Full-year, 40 hours per week assignment to a mental health or related agency having an established internship program. This placement must be approved by the Department of Psychology and include: (a) adequate supervision of the intern and (b) didactic and other educational experiences that supplement practicum work. Registration for fall, spring, and summer terms is required. Prerequisite: Completion of preliminary examination and dissertation proposal, department approval.

5760. Graduate Seminar. 1-10 (Max. 18). Topic varies from semester to semester. Emphasis is upon the preparation of reports on special topics in psychology and the presentation and discussion of these reports in the seminar situation. Prerequisite: 6 hours in psychology and consent of instructor.

5775. Developmental Psychology Seminar. 1-3 (Max. 18). Graduate level seminar in developmental psychology, the topic of which will vary from semester to semester. Emphasis is on providing student with an in-depth analysis of some specific area of developmental psychology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5780. Advanced Cognitive Development. 3. Provides a comprehensive account of current views of cognitive development. Emphasis is given to alternative theoretical explanations for findings from empirical research. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5785. Social Psychology Seminar. 1-3 (Max. 18). Graduate level seminar in social psychology, the topic of which will vary from semester to semester. Emphasis is on providing students with an in-depth analysis of some specific area of social psychology. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

5790. Clerkship in Clinical Psychology. 1-3 (Max. 9). Provides practical clinical and administrative experience in institutional and community settings. Experience includes psychological assessment, group and individual therapy activities, participation in clinical and administrative staff conferences, consultation to various departments and agencies within the institutional setting and in the community, training of professionals in psychological concepts and techniques, and participation in research. Experiences are located in various community, county, and state agencies primarily in the Rocky Mountain region. Successful completion of three clerkships is a required part of the doctoral program in clinical psychology. Prerequisite: enrollment in doctoral program in clinical psychology and assignment by department.

5800. Research in General Psychology. 1-8 (Max 24). Prerequisites: consent of the instructor and graduate standing in the department.

5810. Research in Experimental Psychology. 1-8 (Max. 24). Prerequisites: consent of the instructor and graduate standing in the department.

5820. Research in Social Psychology. 1-8 (Max. 24). Prerequisites: consent of instructor and graduate standing in the department.

5830. Research in Clinical Psychology. 1-8 (Max. 24). Prerequisites: consent of the instructor and graduate standing in the department.

5840. Research in Developmental Psychology. 1-8 (Max. 24). Prerequisites: consent of the instructor and graduate standing in the department.

5850. Research in Comparative Psychology. 1-8 (Max. 24). Prerequisites: consent of the instructor and graduate standing in the department.

5860. Research in Physiological Psychology. 1-8 (Max. 24). Prerequisites: consent of the instructor and graduate standing in the department.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3 (Max. 3). Work in classroom with a major professor. Students are expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5959. Enrichment Studies. 1-3 (Max. 99). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Graduate level course designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate degree program.

5980. Dissertation Research. 1-12 (Max. 48). Designed for students who are involved in research for their dissertation project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their dissertation. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate level degree program.

5990. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 24). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

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