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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management (REWM)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

2000. Principles of Rangeland Management. 3. Basic principles of range management as they apply to various regions and vegetative types. Relationship of range management practices to livestock production, wildlife management, forestry, hydrology and other land uses. Introductory course for majors and non-majors. Prerequisite: LIFE 1001 or 1010. (Normally offered fall and spring semesters)

2500. Rangeland Plant Identification. 2. Sight identification and distribution of western U.S. rangeland plants. Prerequisite: REWM 2000. (Normally offered fall semester)

3020. Nutritional Management of Grazing Ungulates. 3. Characterization of grazing animal nutritional needs and foraging behavior; rangeland forages and supplements. Management of animals and forages/feeds to optimize nutrient intake. Prerequisite: approved University Studies biological sciences course. (Normally offered fall semester)

3100. Principles of Wildland Water Quality. 3. Basic principles of aquatic chemistry and water quality as they relate to watershed management practices including livestock production, agronomic production, mineral and natural gas extraction and other land uses. Cross listed with ENR 3100. Prerequisite: CHEM 1000. (Normally offered fall semester)

3390. Range Judging. 2. Identification of important range plants based upon specialized morphological characteristics. UW Range Judging Team is selected from this course. Prerequisite: REWM 2000, 2500, and 3020. (Normally offered spring semester)

3500. Rangeland Plant Ecophysiology. 3. Examines plant physiological processes that have application to ecological and land management issues. Topics include carbon assimilation, water relations, mineral nutrition as applied to plant distributions, plant and system responses to grazing, as well as plant tolerance of extreme conditions including drought, excessive temperatures and changes in climate. Prerequisite: LIFE 2022 or 2023. (Normally offered fall semester)

4000. Poisonous Plants and Plant Toxins. 3. Plants poisonous to livestock in Wyoming and the Mountain West; identification, ecology, toxic principles, physiologic responses of animals, situations leading to poisoning, control and management to prevent losses. Prerequisite: 12 hours of biological and chemical sciences. (Normally offered spring semester)

4051. Environmental Politics. 3. [C2, W3<>WC] Analyzes environmentalism as a political phenomenon. Provides students with a basic understanding of how to analyze political issues by: (1) examining the historical and contemporary issues that produce controversy over environmental matters; and (2) surveying the impacts of these issues on the formulation and implementation of laws, policies, and regulations. Cross listed with AMST, ENR, GEOG and POLS 4051. Prerequisite: POLS 1000.

4052. Federal Land Politics. 3. Examines the political forces that have shaped and continue to shape federal land policy and management. Explores the interactions between democratic decision making and science in the management of federal lands. Surveys the sources of controversy over federal land management and methods for harmonizing public demands with technical expertise. Cross listed with POLS/ENR/GEOG/AMST 4052. Prerequisite: POLS 1000.

4103 [3103]. Range and Ranch Recreation. 3. [C2<>(none)] Understanding of public demands for leisure use of public and private rangelands; potential impacts on rangeland resources, ranch practices and families and other rangeland users. Students prepare public range or private ranch recreation operations plan. Graduate students assist in preparation and presentation of lecture. Dual listed with REWM 5103. Prerequisites: REWM 2000 and CS course. (Normally offered spring semester)

4150 [3150]. Behavior Modification for Production of Grazing Herbivores. 3. Strategies for manipulation of behavior and management of the grazing herbivore will be developed from scientific and practical information. Designed to equip the student to manage for animal and natural resource production. Dual listed with REWM 5150. Prerequisites: REWM 2000 and REWM 3020 or ANSC 3100. (Normally offered spring semester)

4200. Reclamation of Drastically Disturbed Lands. 3. Overviews reclamation of drastically disturbed lands in the west, emphasizing surface mined lands. Includes principles of ecology, agronomy, soils and other relevant disciplines as applied to mitigate adverse environmental impacts of land disturbance. Prerequisite: LIFE 3400, AECL 2100. (Normally offered fall semester)

4210. Land Reclamation Seminar. 1 (Max. 2). Discusses pertinent topics within the reclamation field of disturbed lands. Prerequisite: REWM 4200 or concurrent registration. (Normally offered fall semester)

4285. Wildland Hydrology. 3. Teaches essential and unique characteristics of hydrologic cycle as occurred on range and forest lands, concentrating on quantification of these processes and storages. Cross listed with ENR 4285. Dual listed with REWM 5285.  Prerequisite: QA (Normally offered fall semester of even-numbered years)

4300 [3320]. Grass Taxonomy. 3. Identification of grasses and their place in range management and world agriculture. Dual listed with REWM 5300. Prerequisite: REWM 2500 or LIFE 2023. (Normally offered spring semester)

4330. Rangeland Ecosystem Assessment and Monitoring. 3. [M3<>(none)] Assessment, monitoring, and analysis of rangeland ecosystems. Students integrate sampling design, measurements of vegetation attributes, ecological site information, and statistical estimation to evaluate rangeland resources. Students collect, analyze, and report data using current technology. Prerequisites: STAT 2050 or 2070 (can be concurrent with either); REWM 2000 (earn at least a C); REWM 2500. (Normally offered fall semester)

4340. Reclamation Techniques Field Trip. 2. Provides increased comprehension of current land reclamation problems and solutions by means of a field trip to sites in region where land reclamation is occurring. Prerequisite: REWM 4200. (Normally offered fall semester)

4530. Seminar. 1 (Max. 2). Discusses pertinent range management problems. Prerequisite: REWM 2000 (earn at least a C) or ENR 4000.

4540. Problems. 1-4 (Max. 6). Experimental work or intensive reading and discussion on range management problems. Includes problems offered in the following areas of range management: natural resources ecology, livestock habitat, business, improvements, watershed, reclamation, extension and international development. Prerequisite: basic training in field of problem selected and consent of instructor. (Offered fall, spring and summer)

4550. Internship in ____. 1 (Max. 4). Supervised field experience in range management or disturbed land reclamation. No more than 4 credits. Prerequisites: basic course work in subject selected and consent of instructor. (Offered fall, spring and summer)

4580. Rangeland Restoration Ecology. 3. Detailed analysis of various disturbed ecosystems unique to western rangelands.  Primary emphasis on plant community restoration following degradation from edaphic, biotic, hydrologic, and topographic influences on degradation and strategies for vegetative rehabilitation. Strong focus on current research to formulate restoration strategies. Dual listed with REWM 5580. Prerequisites: REWM 4200 or LIFE 3400.

4700. Wildland Watershed Management. 3. Studies hydrological cycle with specific emphasis on the role of vegetation in hydrologic processes such as interception, surface detention storage, infiltration, percolation, run-off and water quality. Utilization of watersheds and vegetation manipulation practices to modify these hydrologic processes. Prerequisite: LIFE 1001 or 1010. (Normally offered spring semester)

4710 [4180]. Watershed Water Quality Management. 3. Studies watershed processes controlling water quality. Examines impacts of land use activities such as agriculture production, livestock grazing and mineral and natural gas extraction on surface water and ground water quality. Emphasis will be placed on water quality modeling and management. Dual listed with REWM 5710. Prerequisites: CHEM 1000. (Normally offered spring semester)

4750. Wildlife Habitat Restoration Ecology. 3. Emphasis on fundamental and applied aspects of restoration ecology for terrestrial wildlife habitats following anthropogenic and natural disturbances. Although the course overviews theoretical concepts applicable to many systems, there is a focus on applications for wildlife habitats in western North America. Dual listed with REWM 5750. Prerequisites: REWM 4330 and 4850.

4830. Ecological Applications for Wildland Management. 3. [(none)<>WB] Emphasis on applying understanding of intereactions among components of rangelands to facilitate sustainable provision of ecosystem services. The influences of stocasticity and disturbances on  ecosystem structure and function will be the focus of discussion and technical writing exercises. Prerequisites: WA, REWM 2000 (earn at least a C), LIFE 3400 (latter may be concurrent). (Normally offered fall semester)

4850. Rangeland Vegetation Management Techniques. 3. Uses applied ecological principles in restoration of degraded rangeland ecosystems to introduce methods for manipulating rangeland vegetation that satisfy land management objectives. Provides ecologically-sound practices to maintain optimal and sustained yield of rangeland products. Prerequisites: REWM 2000 and SB. (Normally offered spring semester)

4900. Rangeland Management Planning. 3. [W3<>WC] Applies planning processes that integrate soil, vegetation, water, livestock, wildlife and environmental regulatory considerations within the context of satisfying ecologically sustainable rangeland management objectives. Prerequisites: REWM 4830, ECON or AGEC 1010 or 1020, SOIL 4120 or 4150 (may be concurrent), REWM 3020 (may be concurrent), REWM 4330 (may be concurrent). (Normally offered spring semester)

4990. Undergraduate Teaching Practicum. 1 (Max 2). Teaching experience in classroom or laboratory assisting faculty instructor. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

5000. Range Resource Management. 3. Basic concepts and theories of rangeland resource management, trends in rangeland classification, grazing management and improvement practices. Prerequisite: graduate classification in agriculture or related natural resource subject matter areas.

5050. Range Forage Quality. 3. Effects of environments, grazing and management factors on preference and forage values of native range plants for domestic and wild grazing animals. Prerequisite: graduate or senior standing and REWM 2000 and ANSC 2020 or 3100.

5103. Range and Ranch Recreation. 3. Understanding of public demands for leisure use of and private rangelands; potential impacts on rangeland resources, ranch practices and families and other rangeland users. Preparation of public range or private ranch recreation operations plan. Graduate students assist in preparation and presentation of lecture. Dual listed with REWM 4103. Prerequisites: REWM 2000 and CS course.

5150. Behavior Modification for Production of Grazing Herbivores. 3. Strategies for manipulation of behavior and management of the grazing herbivore are developed from scientific and practical information. Designed to equip the student to manage for animal and natural resource production. Dual listed with REWM 4150. Prerequisite: REWM 2000 and ANSC/REWM 3020 or ANSC 3100.

5250. Water Resources Seminar. 1. Objective is to develop interaction among students from the various water resource disciplines to enhance their perspectives on how water problems are addressed within an interdisciplinary environment. Prerequisite: graduate status.

5285. Wildland Hydrology. 3. Teaches essential and unique characteristics of hydrologic cycle as occurs on range and forest lands, concentrating on quantification of these processes and storages. Cross listed with ENR 5285. Dual listed with REWM 4285. Prerequisite: graduate standing and University Studies QA.

5300. Grass Taxonomy. 3. Identification of grasses and their place in range management and world agriculture. Dual listed with REWM 4300. Prerequisite: REWM 2500 or LIFE 2023.

5520. Ecology and Management of Grasslands. 3. Ecological nature, management strategies, and management problems of North American and world grassland ecosystems. Prerequisites: REWM 4300, 5300 and BOT 4700.

5580. Rangeland Restoration Ecology. 3. Detailed analysis of various ecosystems unique to western rangelands. Primary emphasis on plant community restoration following degradation from edaphic, biotic, hydrologic, and topographic factors. Application of ecological principles to rehabilitate vegetation and restore ecosystem function.  Strong emphasis on current research to formulate restoration strategies. Prerequisites: REWM 4200 or LIFE 3400.

5610. Quantitative Modeling in Landscape Ecology. 3. Emphasis on quantitative, spatial analysis of landscapes and application of these quantitative tools to making sound management decisions. Work with real data, acquire high-level quantitative skills, develop problem-solving skills, and discuss management application of model results. Analysis will encompass abiotic, biotic (plant and animal), and human use of ecological systems in a spatial context. Cross listed with ECOL 5610. Prerequisites: upper division stats course (e.g., STAT 4015 or STAT 4025) and graduate standing.

5620. Graduate Seminar. 1-2 (Max. 6). Presentation and discussion of recent range management research. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5640. Investigation. 1-4 (Max. 10). Research on specialized problems in range management. Investigations offered in the following areas of range management, habitat management, business management, range improvements and monitoring, watershed management, extension and international development. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5710. Watershed Water Quality Management. 3. Studies watershed processes controlling water quality. Examines impacts of land use activities such as agriculture production, livestock grazing and mineral and natural gas extraction on surface water and ground water quality. Emphasis is placed on water quality modeling and management. Dual listed with REWM 4710. Prerequisites: CHEM 1000.

5750. Wildlife Habitat Restoration Ecology. 3. Emphasis on fundamental and applied aspects of restoration for terrestrial wildlife habitats following anthropogenic and natural disturbances. Although the course overviews theoretical concepts applicable to many systems, there is a focus on applications for wildlife habitats in western North America. Dual listed with REWM 4750. Prerequisites: REWM 4330 and 4850.

5800. Experiments in Restoration. 2. Emphasis on the current status of restoration science and the application of ecological theory in restoration ecology. Focus on concepts of population genetics, metapopulation biology and ecosystem science, food webs, biodiversity and invasion, conceptual models, experimental design and climate change. Address topics in experimental, ecological restoration. Prerequisites: graduate standing, STAT 2050, LIFE 3400.

5830. Wildlife Habitat Ecology. 2. For students in animal ecology, wildlife science, or rangeland ecology emphasizing the relationships between wildlife populations and their habitats. Emphasis on concepts forming the basis of wildlife habitat ecology including habitat and niche, carrying capacity, habitat measurements, resource selection, habitat-relationships modeling, habitat management, and habitat restoration. Prerequisites: STAT 2050 (or equivalent) and graduate standing.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3 (Max. 3). Work in classroom with a major professor. Expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate status.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis.  Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate degree program.

5980. Dissertation Research. 1-12 (Max. 48). Designed for students who are involved in research for their dissertation project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their dissertation. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate level degree program.

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