Skip to Main Content

University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Renewable Resources (RNEW)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

2100 [BOT 2100]. Forest Management. 3. Principles of forest management. Topics include the laws affecting forest management, methods of harvesting wood from forests, fire and insect management, the effects of disturbances on stream flow and nutrient cycling, and the challenges of developing management plans for forests. Cross listed with ENR 2100. Prerequisites: LIFE 1001 or 1010.

2345. Natural Resource Ethics. 3. [(none)<>CH, D] Introduction to ethics in context of natural resource extraction, use, conservation, preservation, and distribution. Ethical frameworks include teleological and deontological theories primarily applied to human needs and wants.  Concepts and applications of environmental justice are addressed, including private property, sustainability, and obligations to future generations. Cross listed with ENR/PHIL 2340.  Prerequisites: none.

3000. Tropical Ecology. 3. Examines the characteristics of tropical ecosystems, how they evolved, their value to humans, their present status, and current issues relating to biodiversity, deforestation, extinction, and conservation. Prerequisites: LIFE 1001 or 1010.

4130. Applied Remote Sensing for Agricultural Management. 3. Address principles and applications of remote sensing to crop and rangeland management.  Provides an overview of remote sensing concepts and applications pertaining to crops, shrubs and range vegetation.  In laboratory, students will learn to process remotely sensed data for mapping and monitoring crop and rangelands. Cross listed with AECL/BOT 4130; dual listed with RNEW 5130. Prerequisites: QA course and 9 credit hours in student's major field and junior/senior standing or permission of instructor.

4340. Issues: Environmental Ethics. 3. Encompasses selected topics in environmental and natural resource ethics.  Cross listed with PHIL 4340. Prerequisites: PHIL 2330, 3300, 3350.

4400. Invasive Plant Ecology. 3. Ecological impacts of invasive, non-indigenous plant species, the ecological, genetic and evolutionary hypotheses for invasiveness, as well as management strategies for invasive plant species. Dual listed with RNEW 5400; cross listed with AECL 4400. Prerequisite: LIFE 3400.

4730. Plant Physiological Ecology. 4. Acquaints advanced students with environmental factors which affect the establishment and growth of plants. Emphasizes adaptive mechanisms. Dual listed with RNEW 5730. Cross listed with BOT 4730. Prerequisites: one course in physiology and one course in ecology. (Normally offered spring semester)

4775. Forest Ecology. 4. Integrative study of the structure, function, and ecological diversity of forested ecosystems, and the physical factors that influence this diversity, including emergent properties of energy flow and nutrient cycling.  Special emphasis is given to understanding forest disturbances and succession, and implications for impacts of management and sustainability are discussed throughout. Cross listed with BOT 4775. Prerequisite: LIFE 3400.

4990. Topics in:______. 1-4 (Max. 8). Special topics pertaining to renewable natural resource management. Intended to accommodate instruction in various specialized subjects not offered on a regular basis. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course provided topics are different. Dual listed with RNEW 5990. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor to pursue study of the topic.

5130. Applied Remote Sensing for Agricultural Management. 3. Address principles and applications of remote sensing to crop and rangeland management.  Provides an overview of remote sensing concepts and applications pertaining to crops, shrubs and range vegetation.  In laboratory, students will learn to process remotely sensed data for mapping and monitoring crop and rangelands. Dual listed with RNEW 4130; cross listed with BOT 5130. Prerequisites: QA and 9 hours in student's major field and junior/senior standing.

5200. Spatial Analysis of Watersheds and Ecosystems. 3. Covers topics related to analysis of spatial and temporal processes at watershed and ecosystem scales using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Topics include land classification and suitability analysis interpolation techniques, terrain analysis, model integration, and visualization. Sources of potential error and ramifications are examined. Prerequisite: GEOG 4210 or equivalent.

5400. Invasive Plant Ecology. 3. Ecological impacts of invasive, non-indigenous plant species, the ecological, genetic and evolutionary hypotheses for invasiveness as well as management strategies for invasive plant species. Dual listed with RNEW 4400; cross listed with AECL 5400. Prerequisite: LIFE 3400.

5500. Stable Isotope Ecology. 3. Application of stable isotope measurements to organismal and systems ecology.  Lectures address the theory underlying the use of stable isotopes at natural abundance levels as tracers and integrators of important physiological and ecological processes. Laboratory exercises provide hands on experience with stable isotope ratio measurements. Prerequisite: graduate classification in a natural science or agriculture discipline.

5540. Shrubland Ecology. 3. Ecology of shrub-dominated lands and shrub species in grasslands. Location, importance and environmental constraints of shrub distributions. Topics include herbivory, woody plant invasions, competitive interactions, monitoring and population dynamics. Emphasizes familiarity with scientific literature. Prerequisite: RNEW 3000, BOT 4700.

5545. Shrub Ecology Trip. 2. Field study in North American shrublands of western US ecosystems. Participants learn from researchers, managers, field activities, required readings and written assignments. Participants will be camping and a fee is required. Prerequisite: RNEW 5540.

5730. Plant Physiological Ecology. 4. Acquaints advanced students with environmental factors which affect the establishment and growth of plants. Emphasizes adaptive mechanisms. Lecture with inclusive hands-on laboratory. Dual listed with RNEW 4730; cross listed with BOT 4730/5730. Prerequisite: one course in physiology and one course in ecology.

5775. Forest Ecology. 4. Integrative study of the structure, function, and ecological diversity of forested ecosystems, and the physical factors that influence this diversity, including emergent properties of energy flow and nutrient cycling. Special emphasis is given to understanding forest disturbances and succession, and implications for impacts of management and sustainability are discussed throughout. Dual listed with RNEW 4775; cross listed with BOT 5775 and ECOL 5775. Prerequisite: LIFE 3400.

5959. Enrichment Studies. 1-3 (Max. 3). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes.

5985. Seminar. 1-3 (Max. 3). Current issues relevant to renewable resources research and management. Offered S/U only. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5990. Topics In Renewable Resources. 1-4 (Max. 8). Special topics pertaining to renewable natural resource management. Intended to accommodate instruction in various specialized subjects not offered on a regular basis. Students may enroll in more than one section of this course provided topics are different. Dual listed with RNEW 4990. Prerequisites: none.

Share This Page:

Footer Navigation

University of Wyoming
 
1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071 // UW Operators (307) 766-1121 // Contact Us