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Sociology (SOC)

1000 Level | 2000 Level 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

1000. Sociological Principles. 3. [C2<>CS] Provides a survey of the discipline and foundation for other sociology courses. Explores major areas of interest - ranging from small groups and families to bureaucracies and social movements. Introduces significant concepts and theories, along with tools of social research. Gives attention to contemporary American society, as well as comparative and historical material.

1100. Social Problems and Issues. 3. [(none)<>I,L] Explores various approaches to defining and identifying social problems and applies basic sociological concepts and methods to analysis of selected social problems and issues.

1350. American Indians in Contemporary Society. 3. [(none)<>CS, D] Survey lecture course. Examines social and cultural issues and concerns of American Indians both on and off the reservations. Additionally, the status of American Indian people within the dominant society and culture are explored. Cross listed with AIST 1350.

2070 [2000]. Introductory Statistics for the Social Sciences. 4. [M2<>QB] Presents central ideas of descriptive statistics and statistical inference, as applied to questions in social sciences. Includes graphs, averages, sampling, estimation, hypothesis-testing and relationships between variables. Introduces associated computer skills. Credit cannot be earned in more than one of STAT 2010, 2050, 2070, 4220, 5520. Cross listed with STAT 2070. Prerequisites: MATH 1000, 1400 or equivalent.

2350. Race and Ethnic Relations. 3. [C2<>D] Examines social relations among majority and minority groups by devoting particular attention to race and ethnic relations in the U.S. Encompasses sociological approach to this topic, which emphasizes power structures, economic relationships and cultural traditions historically and today. Devotes attention to social psychological issues, such as prejudice, and social structural issues, such as class inequality. Prerequisite: SOC 1000.

2400. [3300]. Criminology. 3. Generally introduces the nature of crime, statistics on crime, types of criminal behavior and explanations of crime. Cross listed with CRMJ 2400. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or equivalent.

2890. Special Topics. 3. Introduces students to some of the unique sociological interests of our faculty and instructors that fall outside of topics covered in our regular course curriculum. Prerequisites: none.

3000 [2100]. Social Change. 3. [C2, G1, W2<>G] Studies causes, processes and consequences of structural transformations in historical and comparative perspective.  Reviews and assesses forces that account for sociological changes.  Explores social change globally as well as in the U.S.  Cross listed with INST 3000. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 and junior standing.

3090. Sociological Research. 4. [M3<>WC] Examine the design and conduct of social research. Students will complete a research prospectus, including formulating a sociological research question, developing hypotheses, conducting a literature review, surveying prospective data, speculating about potential findings, and discussing implications.  This course satisfies the USP-WC requirement. Prerequisites: STAT/SOC 2070, junior standing in sociology major, completion of WB, and SOC 3900.

3100. Chinese Society. 3. [C2, G1<>G] Reviews origins and consequences of Chinese revolution in comparative and cultural perspectives. Discusses influence of historical traditions and social structure on individual lives and behavioral patterns. Cross listed with INST 3100. Prerequisite: SOC 1000.

3110 [2110]. Self and Society. 3. Considers social behavior at the micro level, emphasizing the influence of society on the individual's thoughts, emotions and behaviors. Topics such as the development of the self over the life course, the self in social interaction, and the role of attitudes and emotions in social interaction are discussed. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or PSYC 1000. 

3150. Collective Behavior and Social Movements. 3. Analyzes and explains fads, fashions, rumors, riots and mass behavior in light of theoretical frameworks. Studies social movements including blacks, women, labor, religions and students. Assesses meaning of contemporary revolutionary movements in Third World countries against sociological interpretations of historic French, Russian and Chinese Revolutions. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or equivalent.

3200. Sociology of Religion. 3. Introduces various ways sociologists interpret religion. Explores the nature of relationships between religion and society. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or equivalent.

3320 [2320]. Family Violence. 3. [C2<>(none)] Prevalence, types and causes of family violence are examined with an emphasis on a sociological understanding. Theories of violence are applied to the conflict that exists within the family institution such as woman battering, courtship conflict and child abuse. Cross listed with CRMJ 3320. Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology or equivalent social science (including SOC 1000).

3400 [4200]. Deviant Behavior. 3. [C2<>(none)] Examines theory and research relevant to understanding deviant behavior in general and specific types of individual and subculture deviancy. Cross listed with CRMJ 3400. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or equivalent.

3500. Sociology of Gender. 3. [W2, C2<>WB] Investigates causes and consequences of gender construction within social institutions such as family, government, education, religion, and economy. Analyzes social structural factors affecting support for gender differentiation, e.g. social values, position in hierarchies of control, access to paid employment, and gendered life experiences. Examines differences by race, social class and sexuality. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 and junior/senior standing.

3550. Medical Sociology. 3. Considers sociological contributions to diagnosis and treatment of illness. Studies social organization of health professions and agencies. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or equivalent.

3605. Sociology of Education. 3. An introductory overview of the principal areas of inquiry in the field. Students learn relevant theories and concepts, principal methodological approaches as well as important current issues in education. Comparative analysis may focus on historical comparisons, national/global comparisons, U.S. regional, and/or variant educational systems at the local level. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or equivalent.

3880. Political Sociology. 3. Study of political theory, political organization, political mobilization, the state, nation-building, national identity, post-nationalism, the relationship between the state and markets, historic formation of the nation-state, and the changing role of the state in a global context. Prerequisites: SOC 1000 and junior/senior standing.

3900 [3700]. Sociological Theory. 3. [C2<>(none)] Examines the emergence and development of sociological theory in the writings of thinkers such as Marx, Durkheim, and Weber. Explores continuities and discontinuities between the classical period of sociological theory and contemporary schools such as functionalism, conflict theory, neo-Marxian theories, symbolic interactionism, phenomenonlogy, and rational choice/exchange theory. Prerequisite: Nine credit hours of sociology.

3950. Environmental Sociology. 3. Explores how ecology, technology, politics, economics, and culture intersect. By analyzing key contemporary environmental debates, students will develop an understanding of sociological analyses, and the impact of social life on our environment, as well as the effect of the environment on social life. Topics covered include: the environmental movement; sustainable development; developing nations and their environment; capitalism and technology; and environmental justice. Cross listed with ENR 3950. Prerequisite: SOC 1000.

4000. Social Inequality. 3. [C2<>(none)] Focuses on structure and consequences of unequal access to political, economic and prestige benefits in American society and the world. Critically examines institutional arrangements that perpetuate and are supported by inequality, as well as patterns of social mobility. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or equivalent.

4020 [4560]. Sociology of Work. 3. [C2<>(none)] Examines social organization of work-especially in response to change in technology, demands for equal opportunity, size and goals of firms and desires for meaningful work. Historically and comparatively analyzes work-life experiences shaping of labor markets and role of collective action. Explores impact of the labor process on distribution of society's material and symbolic rewards. Dual listed with SOC 5560. Prerequisite: SOC 1000, MGT 3210 or ECON 1010.

4110. Sociology of International Development. 3. [C2, G1, W3<>WC, G] Surveys development studies and rural change, including case studies of deliberate change efforts toward industrialization. Includes peasant modes of food production, daily life in subsistence, agriculture, shifts to commercial agriculture and global economy, ethical and critical issues of induced change and different approaches to development process and outcomes. Cross listed with INST 4110. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or ANTH 1200; SOC 3000 recommended.

4140 [4100]. The Family. 3. [C2<>(none)] Two major themes of the course are change experienced by the family institution and the centrality of the family in America today. Subjects that are covered include: A brief history of the family in the U.S., kinship, family structure, mate-selection, marriage, divorce and socialization. Dual listed with SOC 5140. Prerequisites: 6 hours of sociology (including SOC 1000) and junior standing. 

4160 [4050]. Sociology of Aging. 3. [C2<>(none)] The process of aging from the individual to the societal level is the focus of the course. Consequences of this process such as the increase in the number of elderly, retirement and health are examined from the major social institutions, the relationships between these institutions and American society as a whole. Dual listed with SOC 5160. Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology (including SOC 1000) and at least junior standing.

4250. Sociology of Law. 3. [C2, W3<>(none)] A consideration of sociological concepts such as inequality, stratification, social control and social change in an analysis of the law and legal institutions. Topics include: the role of the police, lawyers, judges, and juries; race, sex, age, and sexuality discrimination and civil rights; free speech, and toxic torts. Cross listed with CRMJ 4250. Prerequisites: SOC 1000 and upper division status.

4300. The World System. 3. [G1<>(none)] Analyzes structure of political and economic interdependence among nation-states. Reviews and assesses theoretical approaches to explaining changing structure of inequality, power, war and peace. Dual listed with SOC 5300. Cross listed with POLS 4300 and INST 4300. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or ANTH 1100 or equivalent political science, international studies, or social science course.

4370. Global Political Economy. 3. [(none)<>G] Examines the interaction of politics and the economy at the global level. Evaluates how political and economic decisions of one country or groups of countries affect institutions and life circumstances in others. Assesses the causes of consequences of globalization as rooted in political economy. Cross listed with INST 4370. Prerequisites: SOC 1000 and junior standing or SOC 3000.

4500. Sociology of Organizations. 3. Complex organizations have been described as the dominant feature of modern societies.  Organized on the basis of bureaucratic modes of administration, they dominate contemporary societal institutions, such as the economy, the polity, education, religion, and the military.  This course investigates basic structures and processes of all types of complex organizations. Prerequisites: 6 hours of SOC including SOC 1000 and junior/senior or graduate student standing.

4540. Women, Crime and the Law. 3. [W3, C2<>(none)] Addresses status of women as offenders and as victims in society and in the criminal justice system. Considers special role of women as professionals in the criminal justice system. Cross listed with CRMJ/WMST 4540. Prerequisite: WMST 1080, SOC 3500, or SOC 2400.  

4650. Urban Sociology. 3. [C2<>WC] Considers growth of metropolis and its impact upon modern life. Dual listed with SOC 5650. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or equivalent. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

4680. Shanghai: Past & Present. 3. [(none)<>CS, G] Lectures, fieldtrips, and other cultural activities are all incorporated into the curriculum to help students learn about the political, economic and cultural development in 21st century China. Cross listed with INST 4680. Prerequisites: none.

4700. Science and Modern Society. 3. [W3, C2<>(none)] Leads students to consider how science is a social phenomenon in its practice and in its knowledge by examining the history, culture and methods in science. Prerequisite: 6 hours of social science.

4805. Principles of Population. 3. Considers population structure and demographic transition, with applications to topics such as global population growth, population aging, health, family, migration, urbanization, environment. Dual listed with SOC 5805. Prerequisites: SOC 1000 or equivalent and SOC 2070 or STAT 2070 or equivalent.

4850. Conference. 1-6 (Max. 6). Considers topics of current sociological interest in consultation with a faculty member. Prerequisites: senior standing and 15 hours of sociology. (Normally offered every semester)

4890. Special Topics in____. 1-3 (Max. 6). Accommodates seminar series and/or course offering by visiting faculty whose subject matter is not included in other courses. Prerequisites: junior standing and consent of department. 

4900. Seminar. 3-6 (Max. 6). Considers special topics of current sociological interest. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours credit when topic of seminar is different. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

4950. Seminar. 3-6 (Max. 6). Considers special topics of current sociological interest. May be repeated for maximum of 6 hours credit when topic of seminar is different. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

4970. Sociology Internship. 3. Students gain practical experience in the application of principles learned in sociology courses. Students work with the internship coordinator to select a site and faculty supervisor; intern approximately six hours per week in the host organization; and complete readings and written assignments which reflect the student's work. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Only. Prerequisites: sociology major or minor with a minimum of junior standing and the completion of SOC 1000, and two additional sociology courses.

5000. Advanced Sociological Theory. 3. A consideration of the nature of theory and the major theoretical perspectives in sociology. Prerequisite: SOC 3900 or equivalent.

5020. Sociology of Work. 3. Examines social organization of work-especially in response to change in technology, demands for equal opportunity, size and goals of firms and desires for meaningful work. Historically and comparatively analyzes work-life experiences shaping of labor markets and role of collective action. Explores impact of the labor process on distribution of society's material and symbolic rewards. Dual listed with SOC 4020. Prerequisite: SOC 1000, MGT 3210 or ECON 1010.

5070. Statistical Methods for the Social Sciences. 3. General statistical analyses and their application to the social sciences. Analysis of variance, regression and correlation methods are studied from a data analytic perspective, emphasizing the conceptual understanding of where and when these techniques should be used and the interpretation of their results. Available computer programs are utilized. Credit cannot be earned in more than one of the following courses: STAT 2110, 3050, 5050, 5060, 5070, 5080. Cross listed with STAT 5070. Prerequisite: one course in statistics (all introductory courses except STAT 2000).

5100. Advanced Social Research Methods. 3. In-depth survey of research concepts and methods with emphasis on application that culminates in the designing and execution of a research project by the student. Prerequisite: SOC 5070 or equivalent.

5140. The Family. 3. Two major themes of the course are change experienced by the family institution and the centrality of the family in America today. Subjects that are covered include: A brief history of the family in the United States, kinship, family structure, mate-selection, marriage, divorce, and socialization. Dual listed with SOC 4140. Prerequisite: 6 hours in sociology including SOC 1000 and at least junior standing.

5160. Sociology of Aging. 3. The process of aging from the individual to the societal level is the focus of the course. Consequences of this process such as the increase in the number of elderly, retirement and health are examined for the major social institutions, the relationships between these institutions and American society as a whole. Dual listed with SOC 4160. Prerequisite: 6 hours of sociology including SOC 1000 and at least junior standing.

5200. Conference. 1-8 (Max. 8). Consideration of topics of current sociological interest in consultation with a member of the faculty. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 5250. Seminar. 3-6 (Max. 6). Consideration of topics of sociological interest in the content of a graduate seminar. Cannot be dual-listed with any course below the 5000 level. May be repeated for credit when the topic of the seminar is different. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5250. Seminar. 3 (Max. 12). Consideration of topics of sociological interest in the content of a graduate seminar. Cannot be dual-listed with any course below the 5000 level. May be repeated for credit when the topic of the seminar is different. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5300. The World System. 3. Analyzes structure of political and economic interdependence among nation-states. Reviews and assesses theoretical approaches to explaining changing structure of inequality, power, war and peace. Dual listed with SOC 4300 Cross listed with POLS/INST 5300. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or ANTH 1100 or equivalent political science, international studies, or social science course.

5340. Comparative and Global Sociology. 3. In-depth survey of sociological theory and research on substantive issues such as economic development, nation-building, and conflict and war. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5440. Crime and Deviance. 3. In-depth survey of theory and research on substantive topics such as the social construction of crime and deviance categories, causes of criminal and deviant behavior, and formal mechanisms for the social control of crime and deviance. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5500. Societal Institutions. 3. In-depth survey of theory and research on substantive topics in areas such as religious, political, and medical institutions. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5540. Stratification and Inequality. 3. In-depth survey of sociological theory and research on substantive issues such as social class structure, racial/ethnic relations, and gender stratification. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5650. Urban Sociology. 3. Considers growth of metropolis and its impact on modern life. Dual listed with SOC 4650. Prerequisite: SOC 1000 or equivalent.

5805. Principles of Population. 3. Considers population structure and demographic transition, with applications to topics such as global population growth, population aging, health, family, migration, urbanization, environment. Dual listed with SOC 4805. Prerequisites: SOC 1000 or equivalent and SOC 2070 or STAT 2070 or equivalent.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3 (Max. 3). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 12). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5959. Enrichment Studies. 1-3 (Max. 99). The course is designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: Credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes. Offered S/U only. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Graduate level course designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate degree program.

5990. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 24). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

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