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Presenting Your Research

Office of Research and Economic Development

Kalpana Subedi is from Kathmandu, Nepal and is studying molecular and cellular life sciences. She works in a lab with a Mass Spectrometer machine that uses liquid chromatography to separate unknown compounds. It is used for detection and analysis of a wide range of compounds and small molecules and qualitative and quantitative analyses of samples. Her research involves studying the protein known as TraA. TraA is a cell surface localized protein in Myxococcus xanthus, a soil-dwelling bacteria exhibiting social behaviors associated with higher living organisms such as swarming, rippling, and fruiting bodies formation.

I have learned so much from this project, and have been exposed to fundamental concepts in the fields of ecology, parasitology, and epidemiology. While those facts and theories were educationally significant, more then anything else, this project has thought me to think like a scientist, regardless of the specialty.

 

Undergraduate research helped me find the next step of my career, attend graduate school to pursue a Ph.D.

 

Share your research with a wider audience

Once you feel prepared, presenting your research through a poster or oral presentation at an event or conference is a great way to inform others about the work that inspires you. Below you will find tips and resources for preparing materials for presentations.

You will likely need to prepare an abstract to accompany your registration or proposal for a conference.

What is an abstract and how do you write it?

Whether you’re planning to present a poster or a talk, you’ll need to write an abstract that describes your work in a concise and interesting way. This is a tool for advertising your work to a large audience. Once you have a working draft, compare it to this rubric to ensure you’ve appropriately addressed important content. Take a look at the abstract scoring rubric for guidance on how your work will be reviewed and received by an outside audience.

The abstract is a quick overview or summary of the paper and contains the following:

  • Purpose or rationale of the study – why researcher(s) asked this question

  • Methodology – briefly, how they did it

  • Key results

  • Conclusion – what it means

 

 

How to prepare for an oral talk

Many conferences and venues for sharing research offer participants the chance to give a talk. In general, these are called oral or concurrent sessions. They are concurrent because there are multiple sessions and venues where talks occur at the same time.

The conference organizers can tell you how much time you have to speak, often talks run about 15 minutes, which includes the talk + a question and answer session. Sessions are moderated by someone keeping time and facilitating the questions.

You may not have audience questions, that’s fine! Just be prepared to discuss your research with curious audience members.

 

How to prepare a scientific poster

Posters are a popular way to convey scientific research. When planning to create a poster, students should prepare a brief talk that provides a high-level overview of their poster and research and prepare answer questions from an audience who will walk through the poster session. Rreview the rubric for poster presentations to determine whether your poster is ready for prime time!

  • Presenters must be available to discuss their posters during the session.

  • Posters must be readable from at least three feet away.

Contact Us

Office of Research & Economic Development

Dept. 3355, 1000 E. University Avenue

Old Main Room 305/308

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: (307) 766-5353

Fax: (307) 766-2608

1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071
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