HISTORY OF WYOMING

History 1251, Autumn Term, 2011

 

FINAL EXAM REVIEW QUESTIONS

AHC ASSIGNMENT                                                                                EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITIES

 

Dr. Phil Roberts  (and grader for those with last names beginning with the letter A-F)   T, Th, 9:35-10:50 a.m.

Office: 356 History Bldg., 766-5311 or 766-5101                                                                     129 Classroom Bldg.

Office Hours: Tuesday, Thursday,  11-Noon, and by appointment                                  E-mail: philr@uwyo.edu

 

TEACHING ASSISTANTS:

                                                                Braxton Beemer who will be the grader for those with last names beginning with the letters G-M

                                                                Olivia Hathaway who will be the grader for those with last names beginning with the letters N-Z

                                                                 766-4333, 56 History Bldg.,

                                                Office Hours: 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., T, Th (both Beemer and Hathaway)

               

OBJECTIVE: The course is a general thematic survey to encourage an understanding of Wyoming history, how it relates to the history of the West and the rest of America, and how it has influenced the present.   

 

This course will be set up thematically, although generally, events occurring before 1940 will be discussed in the first half of the semester and later events in the second half.  In neither half, however, will the course be taught in terms of strict chronology. The chronological context, of course, is important because, in history, past actions influence later events. Students will be expected to understand the main themes in the state’s history as well as to recognize the context in the wider national/international perspective.

 

The lectures and readings will provide a general overview and encourage further reading in Wyoming and Western history. Consequently, it is essential for the student to keep up with the reading assignments (both printed and on the web) and to have a clear understanding of the chronology of Wyoming events,. Also, the class will include an opportunity for each student to work with primary documents in the American Heritage Center, providing training on how historians work with one-of-a-kind original documents.

 

This course satisfies the University Studies V1 requirement. Study of the Wyoming and United States Constitutions is an important part of the class.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS. The main texts actually are sets of articles, available on the web. These readings will be important to understand the various events in the state’s history while the lectures are designed to provide the thematic framework. The readings will provide context and continuity, but they will NOT duplicate the lectures. Successful completion of the class requires careful reading of the assigned texts and good note-taking during lectures. Occasional quizzes will be administered to ensure that required readings have been done.

 

Readings in Wyoming History is a compilation of scholarly articles with footnote citations and well-developed historical arguments. Each article will require careful reading. The other assigned books were written for the popular audience and, consequently, are neither extensively footnoted nor difficult to read. 

 

Written outlines will NOT be provided for lectures because all lectures will be accessible through WyoCast. Students are expected to develop better note-taking skills to satisfy the requirements for the course.  On the rare occasions when PowerPoint is used, the emphasis will be on photographic images and maps—not on repeating what is said in the lectures or duplicating student notes. Consequently, relentless attendance will be required in order to succeed in this class.

 

Because class attention will be necessary for successful completion of the course, all students are asked to turn off cell phones and pagers during lectures.  It is expected that students will be using computers, if desired, for note-taking and not for playing games or showing images that distract from full attention in the class and bother students in the proximity. Violations of this behavior may be reflected in verbal request to go elsewhere to conduct viewing and/or penalty assessment of the final grade, particularly the portion respecting participation.

 

REQUIRED BOOKS:

O’Gara, Geoff. What You See in Clear Water:  Indians, Whites and a Battle Over Water in the American West. (Vintage, 2002). Paperback. ISBN-10: 9780679735823

Davis, John W. Wyoming Range War: The Infamous Invasion of Johnson County. (U of Oklahoma Press. 2010),.

Western, Sam. Pushed Off the Mountain, Sold Down the River: Wyoming’s Search for Its Soul. (Homestead, 2002) Paper. ISBN: 0-943972-73-6

Phil Roberts, A New History of Wyoming. (currently available only on the web)

Phil Roberts, Buffalo Bones: Stories from Wyoming's Past (available only on the web)

 

Phil Roberts, editor. Readings in Wyoming History. (web edition), available entirely on the web. Other editions are still available, but the fifth edition contains a number of essays not included in earlier editions.

 

Wyoming Constitution.  (Available for purchase, but also on reserve at Coe Library circulation and on the web).

 

United States Constitution. (On reserve at Coe Library circulation and on the web).

 

                RECOMMENDED BUT NOT REQUIRED:

                T. A. Larson. Wyoming: A History. (W. W. Norton, 1984).

                Mike Mackey. Meeting in Cheyenne: Wyoming’s Constitutional Convention (2011).

“Made in Wyoming: Our Legacy of Success,” joint publication/web pages of the Casper Star-Tribune and Casper Journal, available on the web at: http://www.madeinwyoming.net/

                Robert Righter. Crucible for Conservation: The Crusade to Save Grand Teton National Park. (Moose: Grand Teton Natural History Assoc., 1982, 2000) 

Phil Roberts, David L. Roberts, and Steven L. Roberts. Wyoming Almanac. 6th ed. (Laramie: Skyline West Press, 2010). 

Helena Huntington Smith. War on Powder River: The History of an Insurrection. (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1966). 

                Elinore Pruitt Stewart. Letters of a Woman Homesteader. (Lincoln: Bison Books, 1989).

 

EXAMS: Along with exams and quizzes, a short research paper, based on primary sources, will be required.

One mid-term exam, 150 points (30%); the final exam, 150 points (30%); Constitution exam, 100 points (20%); research exercises, American Heritage Center research paper (requiring attendance, during class time, at an orientation session at the AHC), 75 points (15%); five unannounced quizzes, 25 points, (5%).  Absolutely no make-up quizzes will be given. Make-up exams will be given ONLY IF the student informs the professor or TA before the exam is to be administered with a valid reason for missing the scheduled time. Students are expected to be familiar with the university rules governing plagiarism and academic dishonesty which will be enforced in this class.  This applies to the AHC assignments as well as to the exams.

                American Heritage Center visits will be scheduled later in the semester. Each student will be assigned on one day to go during the regularly scheduled class period.  The names/dates will be noted on the webpage for this class. When preparing the essay for completion of the AHC assignment, students will be given specific instructions during the visit to the AHC.  When the American Heritage Center assignments are made, students are expected to attend on the date they are assigned. Unless PRIOR approval of the instructor is given, missing the date will result in losing all credit for the AHC assignment.

For the AHC Research Assignment specifics, click on this link.

 

                Extra Credit: Additional “extra-credit” points may be earned, from time to time, by attending history-related lectures outside regularly scheduled classes. These opportunities will be announced in advance and will require proof of attendance at the event and a brief statement about the lecture program.  Points given will be determined by the event. Up to a maximum of 20 points may be earned in this fashion.

 

GRADING PROCEDURE: The final grade will be calculated on the total "points" earned during the semester, tentatively based on the following scale:  A: 450-500 points   B: 400-449 points  C: 350-399 points  D: 300-349 points   F: 299 or fewer. The grades in this course will not be “curved.” You will earn your own grade regardless of what others in the class may do. Everyone could earn the grade of “A,” but also the grade of “F.”

 

PLAGIARISM AND ACADEMIC DISHONESTY: Students are expected to know and understand the university’s policies on plagiarism and academic dishonesty. The university rules will be strictly enforced in this class. University Regulations on Academic Dishonesty

 

Outlines of lectures will NOT be posted. Except for the one day during which each student will be at the AHC, all students will be expected to attend and take notes, using WyoCast for general review or to check on items missed during the lecture. The student will be required to use WyoCast for the lecture on the day on which she/he attends the AHC orientation session.

For access to Wyocast, click on the below listed link:

WyoCast

Go to the upper right of the page and Log in (using your university e-mail name and password) and then go to "Fall 2011" and click. Below you will find the link to History 1251. Click on that and you are there and ready to view the recorded lectures.

 

OUTLINE OF TOPICS, MEETINGS AND ASSIGNMENTS (subject to minor change)

 

Aug. 23: Introduction.

 

Thurs., Aug. 25:  Organizing Concepts in Wyoming History

Readings in Wyoming History, Introduction

               

Tues., Aug. 30: Washington and Wall Street West: Early Exploration and the Fur Trade.

New History of Wyoming, Chap. 1:  Original Residents, Explorers and the Fur Trade

                New History of Wyoming, Chap. 2: Lessons from the Fur Trade

 

Thurs., Sept. 1:  Wyoming as a Trail to Somewhere Else: Oregon, California, Mormon, Bozeman Trails

New History of Wyoming, Chap. 3: Trails Across Wyoming

Fort Laramie treaties

 

Sept. 6: Wyoming as a Trail...II: Coming of Rails

New History of Wyoming,  Chap. 4: Coming of Rails

Pacific Railway Acts

Readings in Wyoming History, Selections from John Crowley’s Diary 

               

Sept. 8: Establishing the Territory; Women's Suffrage

                New History of Wyoming, Chap. 5: Establishing the Territory and Granting Women Equal Rights

Buffalo Bones: Stories from Wyoming's Past:  The 1st Woman Juror

Readings in Wyoming History, Near Repeal of Women Suffrage

                Readings in Wyoming History, Wyoming’s Estelle Reel

 

Sept. 13: Open-Range Ranching

New History of Wyoming, Chap. 6: Public Lands

Readings in Wyoming History, Cowboys Form a Health Cooperative

                Group 1 goes to the American Heritage Center. (Last names: A-Ca)

 

Sept. 15: Coal-mining in Wyoming

                New History of Wyoming, Chap. 7: Minerals in Territorial Wyoming

Readings in Wyoming History, The Wyoming Experience: Chinese in Wyoming

 

Sept. 20: Native American Role in Wyoming History

                Reading: O’Gara, Geoff. What You See in Clear Water:  Indians, Whites and a Battle Over Water in the American West.

Readings in Wyoming History: Same Decision, Different Result?

Readings in Wyoming History, Reflecting Community: Case Studies of Three Wyoming Museums and the Impact of Each on the Community

                Group 2 goes to the American Heritage Center (Last names Ce-F)

 

Sept. 22: Society and Culture in the Territory and Beyond

                Prohibition in Wyoming: A Brief Overview

                Buffalo Bones: Stories from Wyoming's Past: 'Drizzling Rain Kept All Indoors': Wyoming’s First Arbor Day, 1888

New History of Wyoming, Chap. 10: Wyoming’s Self-Image

Buffalo Bones: Stories from Wyoming's Past: Edison, the Light Bulb and the Eclipse

                Buffalo Bones: Stories from Wyoming's Past: Wyoming's First License Plates

 

Friday, Sept. 23: Extra Credit Opportunity: Sneak Preview of Ken Burns' film on Prohibition. Wyoming Union, Noon-1 p.m. FREE FOOD, TOO!

 

Sept. 27:  Development North of the Union Pacific Line

New History of Wyoming, Chap. 12: Into the 20th Century 

Readings in Wyoming History, School Bells and Winchesters

                Group 3 goes to the American Heritage Center (Last names G-Ha)

 

Sept. 29:  Statehood

Readings in Wyoming History, The Contest for the Capital.

                               

Oct. 4:  REVIEW for First Exam. By popular request, I have rescheduled the exam for Thursday, Oct. 6. Today will be a good opportunity to ask questions about readings and generally review the structure of the exam.

 

Oct. 6:  FIRST EXAM--on all lectures and materials covered so far, including all of O’Gara. 

The exam will be essay in style. Please bring an examination "blue-book" to class. No electronic devices are allowed today and students are reminded to keep cell phones turned off during the exam. The exam will be designed for completion in 75 minutes (9:35-10:50) and you will not be given additional time due to scheduling commitments in this room. Keep this in mind as you prepare for the exam.

                 

Oct. 11:  Water in Wyoming History

New History of Wyoming, Chap. 13, Water and Irrigation

                Grand Old Men of Wyoming Politics (and Two Grand Women)

                Group 4 goes to the American Heritage Center (Last names He-K)

 

Oct. 13:  Wyoming in the Decade After Statehood

Readings in Wyoming History, Evolution of Roads

Buffalo Bones: Stories from Wyoming's Past, Lovejoy's Toy: Wyoming's First Car

Buffalo Bones: Stories from Wyoming's Past: Torrey's Roughriders

New History of Wyoming, Chap. 9: History of Wyoming Oil 

 

Oct. 18:  The Johnson County War/Invasion. Guest Lecturer: John W. Davis, author of Wyoming Range War: The Infamous Invasion of Johnson County. (U of Oklahoma Press. 2010)

                Reading: Davis, Wyoming Range War: The Infamous Invasion of Johnson County (entire book)

 

Oct. 20, 25: The United States Constitution; The Wyoming Constitution.

Reading: Wyoming Constitution

Reading: U. S. Constitution.

Readings in Wyoming History: Wyoming Constitutional Convention and Adoption of Wyoming’s Constitution, 1889, and the Aftermath

 

Oct. 27: WYOMING/UNITED STATES CONSTITUTIONS EXAM

 

Nov. 1: Wilderness (introduction)

            Group 5 goes to the American Heritage Center (Last names L-Me)

 

Nov. 3: Wilderness Conundrum: Preservation, Conservation, Development

New History of Wyoming, Chap. 11: Conservation and National Parks

Readings in Wyoming History, Progressivism Comes to Yellowstone: Theodore Roosevelt and Professional Land Management Agencies in the Yellowstone Ecosystem

Readings in Wyoming History, Commodification of Wildlife

Readings in Wyoming History, Harvard Cook in the Wyoming Badlands

               

Nov. 8: Wyoming in the 1920s

                Readings in Wyoming History, My One Hobby 

Readings in Wyoming History, Lovell's Mexican Colony   

Readings in Wyoming History, Give Them What They Want

Buffalo Bones: Stories from Wyoming's Past: Somewhere West of Laramie

Buffalo Bones: Stories from Wyoming's Past: The Builder of the World's Oldest Cabin

                Group 6 goes to the American Heritage Center (Last names Mi-P)

 

Nov. 10: Wyoming’s Great Depression (1920-1935)

New History of Wyoming, Chap. 14: The 1920s in Wyoming

New History of Wyoming, Chap. 15: Depression and New Deal  

              History of Wyoming's Sales Tax

 

Nov. 15-17: World War II and the Postwar Years

Readings in Wyoming History, The 100-Octane Fuel Plant

Readings in Wyoming History, O’Mahoney and Japanese Relocation

Readings in Wyoming History,  The Textbook Controversy at the University of Wyoming

Buffalo Bones: Stories from Wyoming's Past, Sleeping with the Nuclear Genie

Readings in Wyoming History, Quest for Public Television

                Readings in Wyoming History,  Visions Beyond an Arrow of Fire

Nov. 15: Group 7 goes to the American Heritage Center (Last names R-S)

Nov. 17: Group 8 goes to the American Heritage Center (Last names T-Z)

 

Nov. 22: Questions of Diversity and Equality

Buffalo Bones: Stories from Wyoming’s Past: Equality State? Cowboy State?

New History of Wyoming, Chap. 18: The 1960s

Readings in Wyoming History, Ethnicity in Wyoming

Readings in Wyoming History,  The Emerging Civil Rights Movement

Readings in Wyoming History,  Fired by Conscience

               Readings in Wyoming History,  The Black 14: Williams v. Eaton

Readings in Wyoming History, 'Mrs. Barriers' and the Crusade to Make Wyoming Public Buildings Accessible

Readings in Wyoming History, The Virginian Meets Matt Shepard

 

Thursday, Nov. 24: NO CLASS. THANKSGIVING VACATION.

                 Buffalo Bones: Stories from Wyoming's Past: No Turkeys at the Post 

 

Nov. 29:  Minerals Boom and Issues of Impact

                Reading: Sam Western, Pushed Off the Mountain, Sold Down the River: Wyoming's Search for Its Soul. (entire book)

New History of Wyoming, Chap. 19: The 1970s

Readings in Wyoming History, Project Wagon Wheel: A Nuclear Plowshare for Wyoming

New History of Wyoming, Chap. 20: The End of the 20th Century

Readings in Wyoming History, Home on the Range No More

                 

Dec. 1: The 21st Century Boom and the Quest for Economic Diversification

 

FINAL EXAM. Tuesday, Dec. 6, 10:15 a.m. The Final Exam will be administered in our regular classroom.

            SAMPLE REVIEW QUESTIONS

          The final exam will be essay in style and you will have two hours to answer the questions. Please bring an examination "blue-book" to class. No electronic devices are allowed today and students are reminded to keep cell phones turned off during the exam. The exam will be designed for completion in 80 minutes, but you will have two hours for this exam, consistent with university final exam policies.

            NOTE:  Throughout the semester, the lectures will be recorded and available on Wyocast. The link will be announced in class during the first session. These are intended to supplement your attendance in class, but not replace your own diligent attendance and note-taking. Students will be expected to attend and take notes, using the Wyocast lectures for general guidance on the main ideas presented and review.