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Saturday University

Fall Term 2011

Fall Term 2011 welcomed professor in the Department of Zoology and Physiology Carlos Martinez del Rio talking about From Big Bang to Big Mac: Stable Isotopes and the Fabric of the World, professor in the Department of Anthropology and director of the Frison Institute Robert L. Kelly talking about Wyoming's Bighorn Basin: 14,000 Years of Climate and Human Population Change, and professor and chair of the Department of English Caroline McCracken-Flesher talking about Jekyll and Hyde: Science and Scandal. Click on the titles above or below to view classes and discussions online.

Talks


Carlos Martinez del RioFrom Big Bang to Big Mac: Stable Isotopes and the Fabric of the World
Carlos Martínez del Rio, Professor, Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming
We can tell a lot about ourselves and life on this planet by counting the number of neutrons in atoms. By analyzing the chemistry of birds' feathers, we can find out the routes they take as they commute across a continent. By analyzing a tiny piece of fingernail, we can know if a person is a vegetarian, carnivore, or fast food junkie. Discover the three simple, yet profound observations that make these miraculous insights possible.

 

Robert L. KellyWyoming's Bighorn Basin: 14,000 Years of Climate and Human Population Change
Robert L. Kelly, Director, Frison Institute, and Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Wyoming 
We can now reconstruct changes in the size of human populations, accurately over thousands of years, with a new method developed by UW faculty. Combined with new UW research into past climate change, we can also examine, more precisely than ever before, the relationships between human population size and climate change. Find out what these new insights from Wyoming's Bighorn Basin could mean for the Rocky Mountain region.

 

Caroline McCracken-FlesherJekyll and Hyde: Science and Scandal
Caroline McCracken-Flesher, Professor and Chair, English Department, University of Wyoming
Robert Louis Stevenson's classic novel, "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde," could easily be re-titled "Mr. Jekyll and Dr. Hyde." A widely-published specialist in 19th century British literature, McCracken-Flesher shows how Hyde reveals the dark side of 19th century doctors, linking medicine and murder, drugs and dreadful deeds. By delving into medical history, modern brain theory, pharmacology and 19th century scandals - from murderous dentists to a notorious dissectionist - discover how Stevenson's universally popular tale reflects contemporary, and evolving, societal beliefs about medicine and drugs.

 

Lunch and Discussion
Moderated by Jean Garrison, director of International Studies and professor in the Department of Political Science, University of Wyoming
Lunch and audience Q & A in the Wapiti Gallery.

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Jekyll and Hyde: Science and Scandal

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Caroline McCracken-Flesher, professor and chair of the Department of English

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