Skip to Main Navigation. Each navigation link will open a list of sub navigation links.

Skip to Main Content

Apply to the University of Wyoming

Global Resource Navigation

Visit Campus
Download UW Viewbook
Give to UW
Menu

Conrad L. Chavez, Jr.

Multicultural Affairs

Dr. Karen Cachevki Williams

Office of Multicultural Affairs

Jerry Parkinson

College of Law

Dr. Jose Rosa

College of Business, Management & Marketing

Dr. Kelly Visnak

UW Libraries


Contact Us

Social Justice Research Center

314 UW Beta House

1731 Fraternity Row

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: 307 766-3422

Email: sjrc@uwyo.edu

SJRC Logo

Social Justice Research Center

Advisory Board Members

College

Representative

American Heritage Center

Amanda M. Stow Assistant Archivist

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Erin Irick

College of Arts and Sciences

Marcus D. Watson 

College of Arts and Sciences

Nevin Aiken

College of Business

Terri Rittenburg

College of Education

Angela Jaime

College of Health Sciences

Christine Porter

College of Law

Melissa Alexander

Information Technology

Alec Muthig

Outreach School

Reed Scull

Haub School of Environment & Natural Resources

Maggie Bourque

UW Libraries

David Macaulay

Wyoming Institute for Disabilities

Michelle Jarman


Maggie Bourque

Maggie Bourque


Social justice is a way of living and taking action with the understanding I am inextricably bound up with all others. The actions of social justice for me are grounded in broad and inclusive kinship—in being with one another, acting out of love, seeking to understand our own fears, and working to change the structural and individual barriers to justice. Participating on the board of the Social Justice Research Center allows me to engage in and help support academic research investigating all aspects of social justice, and to join the UW community in practicing kinship for a more just world. 


Nevin Aiken

Dr. Nevin T. Aiken


Amanda M. Stow 

Amanda M. Stow

Social justice acknowledges and brings value and equity to diverse groups whose rights and privileges have been denied. Throughout history, cultures and governments have systematically negated rights and privileges to communities within their society due to differences of wealth, religion, class, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and gender, often culminating in violence and/or other traumas to the disadvantaged. The documentation of current and past atrocities is often important to reestablish rights and privileges, learn to respect diversity, as well as educate how equity was lost and provide evidence if it is necessary. Social justice is important to me and, as an archivist, so are education and documentation – which is why I joined the SJRC Board of Advisors.


Dr. Michelle Jarman 

Dr. Michelle Jarman

Social justice is a central value in my life — it shapes my personal commitments as well as my academic interests. As a professor and citizen of the university, I see social justice as a broad, critical framework essential to providing students with tools for understanding the complexity of their world. My pedagogical practice is shaped by social justice concerns, especially individual, community, and structural inequities shaped by dis/ability, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and nation. My work with the Shepard Symposium is driven by a desire to engage with diverse perspectives and difficult conversations in an effort to collaboratively work toward more just and equitable futures. 

 angelajaime2

Dr. Angela Jaime

Definitions are hard, I feel as though they are constraining and definitive. It makes more sense to me to think in terms of ways of thinking about social justice work holistically. I advocate and fight for the rights of marginalized groups of people, people who are on the fringes of societies center. I work to break barriers down between people, to encourage dialogue and understanding. I fight for the rights of children, the elderly, people of color, women and the LGBTQ Communities to name a few; those in the margins. If we are not willing to have constructive and open dialogue, we will never move forward as a global society.

I joined the SJRC conversations when it was only a conception or idea. Over the course of a year, under the direction of Dr. Francisco Rios, our group formulated a conceptual framework and structure of the SJRC. Working with other like minds and amazing people, showed me the amazing things that can happen out of social justice and advocacy. I was asked to stay on as an advisory board member when the center was established and have been here ever since.


Alec Muthig 

Alec Muthig

Social justice, at its very foundation, is a movement toward equitable human flourishing, and is concerned with the elimination of unjustified obstacles to flourishing faced by many members of society. Being associated with the Social Justice Research Center gives me a chance to support academic inquiry and educational programs that explore the qualities of a just society, identify factors that perpetuate unjustified inequalities, encourage persons to work toward a fair treatment of the various members of society, and ultimately remove obstacles to human flourishing.


 marcus

Dr. Marcus Watson

For me, social justice refers to efforts at valuing diversity in relation to variables such as culture, race, class, gender, and sexuality and working to ensure that such variables do not lead to discrimination in any situation. I joined the SJRC because, in offering and supporting diversity events and evaluating and funding student and faculty research here and abroad, it is the go-to space on campus to work toward greater social justice on campus, in the country, in the world.


Dr. Christine Porter 

Dr. Christine Porter

Democracy theorist Iris Marion Young notes that “the concepts of domination and oppression, rather than the concept of distribution, should be the starting point for a conception of social justice” (in Justice & the Politics of Difference, p16).  Social justice work, then, means working to end the ways our society systematically works against some groups of people according to classifications our society creates and marks as different. As “other.” As “them” and not “us.” The philosopher-activist Cornel West tells us how to do that work when he says that “justice is what love looks like in public” (fabulously on the Colbert Report, 1/18/11). Oppression stems from fear and the hate that grows from fear. Justice (and personal joy) grows when we muster the courage to face our fears (which often manifest as feeling anger, guilt or defensiveness) and to act, instead, out of love.

Social justice work gives meaning and purpose to my life. It  is my life’s work. Thus, I am grateful that UW has the SJRC to provide a “home” for collaborating on that work within our University.


Reed Scull

Dr. Reed Scull

Social justice is a larger, community-scale state of being, it is a cause, and it is a value.  Fair treatment, care for the welfare of others, respect for differences, harmonious relations with neighbors, and the sharing of resources all are ideas consistent with social justices concepts. The opportunity to contribute to these ideas at the university level is why I have joined the Social Justice Research Center advisory board.


Terri Rittenburg 2

Dr. Terri Rittenburg

For me, social justice means equity and fairness for every member of society, in all arenas, political participation, social interaction, education, and the marketplace. I believe social justice goes beyond equality of opportunity to provide a basic foundation whereby people can realistically engage in those opportunities, without discrimination. My association with the Social Justice Research Center grew out of my interest in business ethics, particularly my work in the area of consumer vulnerability. Despite a cultural value favoring free markets and open competition, there are segments of society who experience vulnerability in the marketplace, sometimes because of the bad behavior of others. I value the perspectives provided through the SJRC in shining a spotlight on injustice and unfair treatment of people based on their personal characteristics and applaud their efforts to engage the UW community in conversation about these issues.


david2


David Macaulay

Social justice is the goal of sustained efforts to identify, understand, and dismantle systemic barriers to the full realization of everybody’s human potential as participants in society, while redressing the historical effects of past injustices. I joined the SJRC as a representative of University of Wyoming Libraries, with the aim of helping researchers on social justice-related topics make their research as widely accessible as possible.


Dr. Erin Irick

Dr. Erin Irick

Social Justice is a primary focus in my personal life as well as professionally. This is why I wanted to join the SJRC advisory board. In my career, I educate and encourage consumers and companies in the apparel and textile industries to make more socially responsible decisions. This includes advocating for fair-trade policies, ethically-produced products and environmentally-sustainable methods, which I believe all fall under the larger umbrella of social justice.


Melissa Ballengee Alexander

Melissa Ballengee Alexander

I joined the Social Justice Advisory Board because I believe that working on social justice, and aiding and encouraging other people who do, can help make concrete changes that improve lives.  Studying health law exposes the myriad ways that structural inequality undermines health for vulnerable populations.  Approaching health policy, practice and laws with humility, respect and solidarity with those impacted, leads to dramatically improved results and a stronger community.


Share This Page:

Conrad L. Chavez, Jr.

Multicultural Affairs

Dr. Karen Cachevki Williams

Office of Multicultural Affairs

Jerry Parkinson

College of Law

Dr. Jose Rosa

College of Business, Management & Marketing

Dr. Kelly Visnak

UW Libraries


Contact Us

Social Justice Research Center

314 UW Beta House

1731 Fraternity Row

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: 307 766-3422

Email: sjrc@uwyo.edu

SJRC Logo

1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071
UW Operators (307) 766-1121 | Contact Us | Download Adobe Reader

Twitter Icon Youtube Icon Instagram Icon Vimeo Icon Facebook Icon

Accreditation | Emergency Preparedness | Employment at UW | Gainful Employment | Privacy Policy | Accessibility Accessibility information icon