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Lander Student Works with Wyoming Conservation Corps


September 9, 2010 — University of Wyoming student, Calla Massman of Lander, gained valuable leadership and outdoor skills working this summer with the Wyoming Conservation Corps.

Massman constructed a Wind River Wilderness access trail in Boysen State Park. In Bear River State Park, she and her crew built trails and did boardwalk maintenance work. She helped restore the Fort Bridger State Historic Site, and in Glendo State Park Massman built hiking and mountain bike trails. For the Casper Biathlon Club she helped cut a Nordic ski trail.

She was among 48 WCC student workers who logged more than 31,000 hours of service on 36 projects completed this field season. Crews assisted resource managers with public lands management activities.

"'Leadership in public service' is the motto of the Wyoming Conservation Corps, with Wyoming's residents as the beneficiaries of the crews' hard work enhancing public lands," says Indy Burke, director of the University of Wyoming's Environment and Natural Resources program that coordinates the WCC program.

With sponsors such as UW's School of Energy Resources, as well as industry, corporate and non-profit organizations, WCC partnered with state and federal land management agencies on projects that involved students tackling a variety of outdoor leadership skills.

"Students are our future land stewards and through the WCC they can learn first hand about natural resources and energy development in Wyoming," said Mark Northam, director of UW's School of Energy Resources. "The wide assortment of projects on public lands allows them to gain the skills and field experiences necessary to pursue a career in natural resources."

Founded in 2006, this year represents WCC's fourth successful field season. The WCC relies on grant dollars to fulfill its mission and in 2010 generated $46,000 in private and foundation gifts in addition to receiving funding from AmeriCorps.

The WCC has been built on the long legacy created by the Civilian Conservation Corps of the 1930s and the Youth Conservation Corps of the 1970s. "The WCC continues this legacy by carrying out the highest caliber of service for Wyoming's public lands," said Kendall Peacock, a WCC project coordinator.

As an AmeriCorps program, WCC requires 450 to 900 volunteer hours that start in the classroom and end in the field. Members earn a monthly stipend and college credits during the academic year, receiving extensive training in leadership, civil engagement, and natural resource ethics, Peacock added.

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