Skip to Main Navigation. Each navigation link will open a list of sub navigation links.

Skip to Main Content

Apply to the University of Wyoming apply now

Global Resource Navigation

Visit Campus
Download UW Viewbook
Give to UW

August Planetarium Schedule at UW Explores Ancient and Unseen Aspects of Astronomy

August 2, 2018
the planet Saturn and a nebula
Planets, galaxies and … painters? This month, programs at the UW Harry C. Vaughan Planetarium take a look at the universe from a different perspective and celebrate the artistic inspiration of space. (UW Planetarium Photo)

During August, shows at the University of Wyoming Harry C. Vaughan Planetarium will take a closer look into the ancient and unseen aspects of astronomy.

Kid-themed planetarium shows are Saturdays at 11 a.m. The month also includes four Tuesday night shows; they begin at 7 p.m.

Tickets cost $3 for students and $4 for non-students, and can be purchased at the Department of Physics and Astronomy main office, located in Room 204 of the Physical Sciences Building, Monday through Thursday, from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m., and Friday from 8 a.m.-noon. Tickets also can be purchased by going online at www.uwyo.edu/physics/ and clicking on “Planetarium Schedule.” Doors open 20 minutes before each show, where tickets will be sold if available. The planetarium, which seats 58, is located in the basement of the Physical Sciences Building.

The August planetarium schedule is as follows:

-- “Around Another Sun,” Friday, Aug. 3, 8 p.m. The Earth and other planets work their way around the sun every year but, until the 1990s, we had no idea that planets orbit many other stars beyond our solar system. This program will explore exoplanets. The STAR Observatory on the rooftop of the Physical Sciences Building will be open to the public 8-10 p.m. Weather permitting, telescopes will be set up to peer into the evening sky.

-- “This Month’s Sky,” Tuesday, Aug. 7, 7 p.m. This program looks at constellations, meteor showers and visible planets.

-- “In a Galaxy Far, Far Away … or Maybe Not,” Friday, Aug. 10, 8 p.m. This program will explore the origin of galaxies and cosmological giants discovered by the famous Hubble telescope.

-- “The Earth’s Closest Star,” Saturday, Aug. 11, 11 a.m. This program will explore the sun and how it works. The STAR Observatory on the rooftop of the Physical Sciences Building will be open for an activity after the program.

-- Full-dome movie, “From Earth to the Universe,” Tuesday, Aug. 14, 7 p.m. The night sky, both beautiful and mysterious, has been the subject of campfire stories, ancient myths and awe for thousands of years. This film explores theories of the ancient Greek astronomers to today’s grandest telescopes.

-- “The Art of Space,” Friday, Aug. 17, 8 p.m. Historically, humanity has gazed at the cosmos and seen a giant tapestry but, recently, science has dominated the way we look to the heavens. This program looks at space not as the scientific curiosity, but as the artistic inspiration. The STAR Observatory on the rooftop of the Physical Sciences Building will be open to the public 8-10 p.m. Weather permitting, telescopes will be set up to peer into the evening sky.

-- Full-dome movie, “From Earth to the Universe,” Tuesday, Aug. 21, 7 p.m. The night sky, both beautiful and mysterious, has been the subject of campfire stories, ancient myths and awe for thousands of years. This film explores theories of the ancient Greek astronomers to today’s grandest telescopes.

 -- “Wonders of the Ancient Skies,” Friday, Aug. 24, 8 p.m. Archeoastronomy is the fusion of two seemingly different fields, which happen to be very similar in purpose. This program explores ancient wonders in the study of astronomy, such as the Egyptian pyramids, Stonehenge and even Mayan marker stones, and attempts to understand their purpose and the people who left them.

-- “How We Reclassified Pluto,” Saturday, Aug. 25, 11 a.m. From its discovery as a planet in 1930 to reclassification in 2006, Pluto has been a hot topic in the United States and a favorite among schoolchildren. This program remembers Pluto: its brief period as a planet; reasons for its reclassification; New Horizons discoveries; and America’s reactions to it all. A pocket solar system activity for visitors follows the program.

-- Full-dome movie, “From Earth to the Universe,” Tuesday, Aug. 28, 7 p.m. The night sky, both beautiful and mysterious, has been the subject of campfire stories, ancient myths and awe for thousands of years. This film explores theories of the ancient Greek astronomers to today’s grandest telescopes.

-- “Astronomy Mythbusters,” Friday, Aug. 31, 8 p.m. What causes the seasons? Do astronauts feel gravity in space? What causes the phases of the moon? What are shooting stars? What color is the sun? When I look at a star, has it already burned out? These are some common astronomy questions many think they know the answer to, but could be wrong. This program busts myths and misconceptions about space.

For more detailed descriptions of these programs, go to www.wyomingspacegrant.org/planetarium/shows/.


Share This Page:

Contact Us

Institutional Communications

Bureau of Mines Building, Room 137

Laramie

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: (307) 766-2929

Email: cbaldwin@uwyo.edu

Find us on Facebook (Link opens a new window) Find us on Twitter (Link opens a new window)

1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071
UW Operators (307) 766-1121 | Contact Us | Download Adobe Reader

Twitter Icon Youtube Icon Instagram Icon Facebook Icon

Accreditation | Virtual Tour | Emergency Preparedness | Employment at UW | Gainful Employment | Privacy Policy | Harassment & Discrimination | Accessibility Accessibility information icon