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Department of Veterinary Sciences|College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

PATB 4110 - Diseases of Food Animal and Horses

Course Information

OBJECTIVE

This course is intended to familiarize livestock managers and pre-veterinary students with common diseases in cattle, sheep, pigs and horses. The emphasis is on control and prevention. Due to their importance in the region, examples from the beef cattle industry are used to demonstrate principals of control.

STRATEGY

  • Familiarize students with principals of disease processes, including agents of disease (infectious and non-infectious), host-pathogen interactions, host defense mechanisms and immunity, mechanisms of disease, disease transmission, and methods of treatment and control.
  • Every effort will be made to simplify learning of infectious disease nomenclature and to deemphasize jargon. Nevertheless, you need to make an effort to learn general classifications of disease agents and some medical terminology. If it is novel to you, ask.
  • Diseases will be grouped by involved organs (e.g., respiratory tract, digestive tract, central nervous system, reproductive tract) and common clinical syndromes (sudden death, diseases in feedlots, intoxication) to assist learning.
  • Management factors to control disease will be stressed.
  • The economics of disease will be addressed.
  • Common herd health measures to prevent disease before they become a major problem will be emphasized.
  • The purpose of the course is not to make you a veterinarian. Instead, it is to familiarize you with disease syndromes you may encounter so you will know when to treat it yourself, involve your veterinarian or submit samples to an accredited veterinary diagnostic laboratory.
  • Diseases of public health importance to people (zoonoses = diseases transmitted from animals to people) will be discussed.
  • Common disease problems, particularly for range operations in the western US, are emphasized.
  • Every effort will be made to integrate course material from related disciplines such as nutrition, microbiology and biochemistry, as well as from the popular press.
  • You will be exposed to elements of biology, microbiology, nutrition, animal husbandry, toxicology and pathology.  The three instructors are pathologists.  All are in the Department of Veterinary Sciences. Use will be made of case material submitted to the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory, as well as other sources such as the Dr. John King image set at Cornell.
  • You will find links to external sites on the lecture notes. THESE ARE FOR INTEREST. You will NOT be examined on external material.
  • Please download the PPT notes of each lecture BEFORE each lecture. Make your annotations on those. More detailed class notes in HTML format (below) should be downloaded AFTER each lecture. I generally load the final version of the PPT notes on the morning of class.  It is your responsibility to be sure you have the current version from which I lectured, since examination questions will be drawn from those.


INSTRUCTORS

Dr. Donal O’Toole, Veterinary Pathologist

Professor, Veterinary Sciences307 766 9976

dot@uwyo.edu

Office: WSVL #119

 

Dr. Don Montgomery, Veterinary Pathologist

Head, Veterinary Sciences

Director, Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory

Professor, Veterinary Sciences

montgome@uwyo.edu

 

Dr. Jonathan Fox, Veterinary Pathologist

Associate professor, Veterinary Sciences

JFox7@uwyo.edu

 

Dr. Shannon Swist, Veterinary Pathologist

Assistant professor, Veterinary Sciences

sswist@uwyo.edu

Office hours: All the instructors are in Department of Veterinary Sciences in the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory building in West Laramie at 1174 Snowy Range Road (beside I-80). Instructors email addresses are above. Instructors can meet with students before or after class. We do not have official office hours.  We are generally available any time we are in our office (usually 8:00 - 5:00 weekdays). If other meeting times or extensive assistance is required (i.e. 30 min or more), students are encouraged to make an appointment via email.

RECOMMENDED TEXT

Text: Merck Veterinary Manual is available online   Notes for the lectures are available online in two forms: as pdf versions of the PowerPoint lectures and in HTML format. Where there are links to sites of interest, these are intended as supplemental information.  With few exceptions, such as chapters in MVM that I will specifically ask you to read or links I ask you to visit, information via links will NOT be on the examination, since the information is large and technical. I do want to know what is out there, and to be able to discriminate reliable from unreliable information.

If a technical word is used in class or in your notes that you do not understand, it is your responsibility to look it up in a medical dictionary or ask an instructor in class or via email to clarify. There are good medical dictionaries in the UW libraries such as Black's, Stedman's and Mosby's. All are at the reference desk at Coe Library. For those of you who work at the WSVL, there is a copy of Dorland's medical dictionary in the front office.

GRADING AND EXAMINATIONS

Grading is based on the total points earned on four exams on the following dates:

Monday Sept 13

Examination #1

Multiple choice/short answer

4:10 - 5:00

AG 1030

100 points

Monday Oct 11

Examination #2

Multiple choice/short answer

4:10 - 5:00

AG 1030

100 points

Monday Nov 8

Examination #3

Multiple choice/short answer

4:10 - 5:00

AG 1030

100 points

Monday Dec 6

Examination #4

Multiple choice/short answer

1:15 - 3:15

AG 1030

100 points

Each examination period is 4:10 - 5:00 PM.  It is more important you get it right than you get it fast - within reason.  Grades are based on four examinations (100 points per examination) given during the semester. Each examination is cumulative for material learned to that time, but may emphasize more recent material lectured. No makeup examinations are given unless students make an arrangement with the instructor before the examination time. If you miss an examination and have not made prior arrangements, you get 0 points for missed examination.   If you are sick or have a family emergency, contact me in advance (work: 742 6638 or direct line: 307 766-9925; or by email). Grades are below. I do not negotiate grades.  If you think I made a mistake on grading, bring it to my attention immediately, and we will discuss.  Do NOT do this at the end of the semester. 

A = 90% -100%; B = 80 - 89.99% C = 70 - 79.99%; D = 60 - 69.99% F = <60%

Exams consist of any combination of definition/description, multiple choice, matching, true/false, or short answer questions. The points available on each exam are based on the number of lectures covered. At the students' request, review sessions can be done before schedules examinations. To facilitate student learning and to help me see whether material is being retained, ungraded quizzes may be given periodically.   

If the class wants to do a review session to clarify issues in the notes, you MUST bring questions with you to the session. The best time and place for us to do this is on the week of each examination before 8:00 AM or after 5:00 PM.

The date of the final examination is determined by the registrar's office.  DO NOT PLAN TO LEAVE TOWN BEFORE THE FINAL EXAMINATION - the date listed about (Monday Dec 6) can be changed by the registrar's office.  If you elect to do this and have not been excused, you get a 0 for that examination.  This affects your cumulative grade.

GRADUATE STUDENTS TAKING  PATB 5130

Graduate students: This year (2100) is the first time the class is open to graduate students.

Monday Sept 13

Examination #1

Multiple choice/short answer

4:10 - 5:00

AG 1030

100 points

Monday Oct 11

Examination #2

Multiple choice/short answer

4:10 - 5:00

AG 1030

100 points

Monday Nov 8

Examination #3

Oral presentation/paper

4:10 - 5:00

AG 1030

100 points

Monday Dec 6

Examination #4

Multiple choice/short answer

3:30 - 5:30

AG 1030

100 points

Graduate students will be given 25 minutes to present on a topic agreed with the lecturers toward the start of the semester on April 19.  On the same day they will submit the final version of their term paper on the same subject.   The term paper will be written in the format of JAVMA and will be appropriately referenced, double-spaced and 10 - 12 pages long. 

READINGS

As part of the course, I may direct you to some reading material.  These are topical, generally peer-reviewed articles.   It is your responsibility to read them.  The purpose is get you used to reliable articles since hese are the sources on which derivative web-based articles such as Wikipedia are based.  I reserve the right to draw examination questions from these articles. 

STUDY GUIDE

The study guide comprises the questions at the bottom of each HTML page.  These emphasize important topics, and a variant of some of these questions may be used for examination purposes.

MAKE-UP POLICY

Make-up exams will be given ONLY upon submission in writing of a justifiable absence and at my discretion. Unless absence is due to an emergency, students MUST notify me before the absence such that appropriate make-up arrangements can be made. All make-up exams MUST be completed before the 2nd class period following the scheduled exam.

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

Academic dishonesty is not acceptable.  If you observe a dishonest act with regard to this course, please notify me.  Any student suspected of academic dishonesty will be dealt with appropriately and promptly. The standard sanction is dismissal from the course, an F grade, and notification to your advisor. If you have questions regarding policies on academic dishonesty at the University of Wyoming, see the General Bulletin.

USE OF ELECTRONIC DEVICES DURING CLASS TIME:

Cell phones, Blackberrys and MP3 players are distraction to the learning environment of the classroom. Consequently, use these devices must cease (turned off or put on vibrate/silent) upon the start of each lecture/lab or exam. If necessary to respond to a call or text message, leave the classroom quietly or wait until the lecture period is over to do so. In the event of a University emergency (i.e. activation of the UW-ALERT system), the instructor will notify the class.  If a phone goes off during class, or a student is using an electronic device other than a laptop computer, I will ask you to leave the lecture for that period.

RELATED COURSES

PATB 4130/5130.  Mammalian Pathobiology.  3 credits.  Instructors: Dr. Donal O'Toole, Dr. Don Montgomery and Dr. Shannon Swist.  Offered fall semester.   This course acquaints students with anatomical basis of disease in mammals.  Its emphasis is on concepts of disease pathogenesis, and the gross, microscopic, and clinicopathological changes associated with disease: cell injury and death; cellular degeneration; disturbances of growth and circulation; neoplasia; inflammation; and recognition of gross and microscopic tissue changes.   Prerequisites:  C grade or better in BIOL 2022. Students with a background in Immunology (PATB or MOLB 4400) will be at an advantage in this class

PATB 4120/5120. Diseases of Wildlife. 3 credits. Offered spring semester of even-numbered years, so it is offered this semester. Dr. Todd Cornish is the instructor.  It covers mechanisms of disease, pathobiology, epizootiology and population dynamics in wildlife infected with viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, helminths and arthropods. It discusses metabolic, traumatic, toxic and neoplastic diseases. It is suitable for wildlife majors, microbiology majors and pre-veterinary students interested in wildlife disease management. Students can take this at a graduate level (5120) in which case they participate in three necropsy/case studies during the semester and prepare three case reports.   Prerequisite: 12 hours of biological or zoological sciences. MICR 2220.

PATB 2220/MICR 2220.  Pathogenic Microbiology (Bacteriology). 4 credits.  Instructor: Dr. Gerry Andrews. This course covers the major human communicable diseases caused by bacteria. It is aimed to provide microbiology majors with a solid grounding in the basis and mechanism for diseases. Class material focuses on disease, diagnosis, treatment, prevention and transmission. Prerequisite: MOLB 2210 / MICR 2210. There is a laboratory with this class. It is taught each spring.


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