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Fall 2021 Honors College Courses

Registration Guidelines

Meeting times, locations, CRNs, specific section numbers, are all listed in WyoRecords under the “Look Up Classes” search function. 

Pre-Requisites: All Honors Upper-Division Classes (3000 and 4000 level) require students to have completed their COM 1 and COM 2 requirements.

Main campus Honors College fall courses will open to non-Honors College after the early enrollment period. Non-Honors College students wishing to register for these courses need to have at least a 3.25 cumulative UW GPA and will need to request an override from the Honors College. Students should email Cass Tolman at ctolman2@uwyo.edu to make this request. Online Honors classes are open to all students.

*Please note that Honors College FYS courses are open to all UW students with no override necessary.

Advising

Please reach out to the Honors Advising Team for more information and guidance when registering.

Course Modalities

  • Traditional – This means that the class is scheduled to be in-person and students will meet face-to-face.  

  • Asynchronous Online –  This means that the course will be completely online, without any scheduled meeting dates or times. 

  • Synchronous Online – This means that the course will be completely online, but there will be a synchronous requirement, meaning students will have specific day/times scheduled for Zoom sessions.

Fall 2021 Course Descriptions

HP 1020:  Honors Colloquium I
REQUIRED FOR ALL FIRST-YEAR HONORS STUDENTS*
*A first-year student is any student who begins at UW with fewer than 30 post high school college credit hours.  Students who earned an associate’s degree while completing their high school degree are still considered first-year students.
Instructor: Various 
Modality: Various
Honors College Attributes: Colloquium 1
USP attributes: (COM1) Communication 1
A&S attributes: none
HP 1020 is the first course in the Colloquium sequence.
The first-year Colloquium is a required two-semester sequence of courses that takes the complex topic of Dreams and Reality and explores it with readings based in the humanities, arts, sciences, and social sciences. The courses builds community in the Honors College while promoting high levels of academic achievement. In the Colloquium, students push themselves to become stronger critical thinkers. They weigh and consider multiple points of view; they develop thoughtful, well-supported perspectives on important issues of our times; and they defend their ideas in public presentations.
 
Colloquium is enriched with visits to UW’s Theatre and Dance department, Art Museum, Archives, and Library, and with service projects carried out around Laramie. Expert faculty from various departments give specialized lectures on relevant topics. Distinguished visiting scholars and writers meet with students to discuss their work. In all these ways, Colloquium teaches students to take advantage of the rich resources we are privileged to have at UW.

 

HP 1101: First Year Seminar: Narratives of Success
Instructor: Ann Stebner Steele
Modality: Traditional
USP attributes: FYS
A&S attributes: none
What does it mean to be successful? How do we as individuals and a society define success? What stories do we tell about successes and our failures?  As a first-year college student, you already have and will continue to encounter many different metrics that attempt to define success for you: grades; honors and awards; degrees earned; parental expectations; peer perceptions; and the list goes on.  But how do you define success for yourself?  How will you know when you’ve “made it?”  How can you defy the expectations of others when your own goals and vision do not align with theirs?

In this class, we will engage with a variety of narratives in the form of films, documentaries, podcasts, blogs, novels, memoirs, non-fiction books about psychology, sociology, leadership, and community – we will explore each of these narratives in relationship to what they tell us about how we define success and come to a deeper understanding our own goals and vision in the process.

 

 

HP 1101: FYS: Calling BullS#!% In a Science-Driven World 
Instructor: Patrick Kelley
Modality: Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
none
USP attributes: (FYS) First-Year Seminar
A&S attributes: none
Science depends on thoughtful collection, analysis, and interpretation of quality data. If not handled responsibly and transparently, data can yield bull$#!% science. Our primary goal will be to learn to identify bull$#!% in our scientific environment, namely in the publication, reporting, interpretation, and application. During this course, we will seek out, define, and quantify the amount of scientific bull$#!% (relative to non-bull$#!%) in an attempt to understand if the rate of accumulating bull$#!% is causing irreversible damage to science. We will work to investigate the nature of mistakes, obfuscations, and other types of bull$#!% in science and its reporting. We will explore topics such as publication bias, meta-analyses and multiple working hypotheses, statistical traps, data blinding, as well as the increased focus on Big Data and data visualizations that impact how people view the scientific process. We will engage with scientific articles, topic reviews, and popular press articles and spend much time thinking about the data that surround us (e.g. social interactions, movement patterns of students and other animals, instructor behavior, eating habits) to understand what data are. Students will design and execute original research on data bull$#!% and present this work as a conference-style poster. Students will be exposed to data processing (to gain an understanding of basic data informatics, i.e. what it means to collect and organize data. Students will gain an appreciation for formal scientific research as well as an understanding of how scientific research careers develop.

 

HP 1101: FYS: Travel Writing
Instructor: Paul Bergstraesser
Modality: Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
none
USP attributes: (FYS) First-Year Seminar
A&S attributes: none
* Crosslisted with ENGL1101 (7U)
“True travels and the inquiry of the essayist,” states travel writer Paul Theroux, “require the simpler stratagems of being humble, patient, solitary, anonymous, and alert.”  In this course, you will be asked to explore your “traveling self” as well as refine your skills as a writer.  We will study the essays of such writer/travelers as Pico Iyer, Gary Shteyngart, Andrea Lee, and Colson Whitehead, whose work stretches from Las Vegas to Bombay.  We will also look closely at the act of writing nonfiction, focusing on its analytical and creative techniques.  Through a series of trips based on and off campus (to the Art Museum, to Laramie, to Southeast Wyoming) and a slate of activities (essays, interviews, a travel video) you will learn to define yourself as a traveler and enrich your life experience through travel.    

 

HP 3151: Chinese Medicine and Models of Healthcare
Instructor: Chris Dewey
Modality: Traditional
Honors College Attributes:
Honors Non-Western. Note: Students who have already completed their Honors Non-Western requirement may use this course as an Honors upper-division elective
On offer here is a class that examines Traditional Chinese Medicine as an integral component of contemporary models of health care. Students will learn from a practicing Chinese Medicine clinician about evidence-based practice, the theories of Traditional Chinese Medicine, its modalities including acupuncture, how it is used to treat disease, and the diagnostic tools we use in a clinical setting. Students will also participate in a typical client intake and observe a full acupuncture treatment. Together we will examine what it means to use Chinese Medicine in service of the consumer’s journey to wellness. The nuanced and abstruse lexicon used by practitioners in any branch of health care, combined with the ways in which Eastern and Western care paradigms differ from each other, can be confusing and alienating to both practitioners and consumers alike. The course will help to dispel the confusion and division that can exist between seemingly different models of health care and demonstrate the value of integrated medicine to health, healing and wellness.

 

HP 3151: Indian Short Story
Instructor: Nina McConigley
Modality:
Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
Honors Non-Western. Note: Students who have already completed their Honors Non-Western requirement may use this course as an Honors upper-division elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: (G) Global
The short story in India has old and epic roots. From Indian folktales to Rabindranath Tagore, and now to the modern Indian story of the Diaspora – the short story has been used to tell the story of India for centuries.  

In this class, we will focus on the form of the short story by writers of South Asian (Indian) decent. Using the lens of the short story, we will examine how these writers explore gender, class, religious, and other differences in India and beyond. Beginning with folktales and looking at writers from India (including works translated into English), we will examine a rich array of the Indian experience. Moving out from India, we will look at the experiences of the migrant, the Indian writer grappling with immigration and diaspora in countries like England, the United States, Sri Lanka, South Africa, Trinidad and Tanzania.  

We will also examine the historical contexts and cultural forces that shape Indian identity as it is represented in the form of the short story.

 

HP 3151: Literature and Medicine
Instructor: Michelle Jarman
Modality: 
Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
Honors Upper Division Elective
This course explores how literature and memoirs have grappled with illness, disease, and disability, paying particular attention to the perspectives of doctors, nurses, patients, families, and communities in shaping meanings of diagnoses, health, and access to care.

Drawing from novels, short stories, poems as well as memoirs by physicians, nurses, and those impacted by health systems, this course aims to bring literature and medicine together through narrative. Course materials focus primarily on U.S. contexts from the Civil War era to contemporary works. Throughout, we look to these texts to complicate and examine binary notions of health/illness, normality/disability, and doctor/patient perspectives. 

 

HP 3152: Modern Japanese Society and Culture
Instructor: Noah Miles
Modality:
Asynchronous Online
Honors College Attributes: 
Honors Non-Western. Note: Students who have already completed their Honors Non-Western requirement may use this course as an Honors upper-division elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: (G) Global
This course is designed to introduce Japanese society and culture.  The class will take a thematic approach to the study of Japan.  We will integrate history and literature from the Jomon to the Edo periods, covering a diverse range of topics including: language development, the introduction of Buddhism, poetry, classical and modern literature, traditional arts and holidays concluding with the development of popular culture.

 

 

 

HP 3152: Race and Racism
Instructor: Steven Bialostok
Modality:
Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
Upper-division elective
USP attributes: 
(H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: (D) Diversity
This course is framed by a simple contradiction. Race is a myth, yet it is quite real. Racial categories are rooted in history and culturally constructed through laws, the media, and various institutions. Yet, what makes race real? What animates it with so much power, and fosters its tenacious hold on much of the Western world’s collective psyche?

In this course, we explore race and racism in both its historical construction and its contemporary manifestation as a crucial aspect of American culture and an integral component of people’s identity. Class time will consist of lectures (including guest lecturers), small and large group discussions, watching documentaries and clips from television, movies, and YouTube.

Everyday thinking about race (and racism) in America is almost entirely emotionally laden, even when we are certain that our assertions are logical and rational. Work in cognitive anthropology, psychology, and political science reveal that our “feelings” about emotionally laden topics invariably contradict “facts.” For example, one common assertion is that students of color get more scholarships that white students. Research indicates that is not the case (https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=134623124). Where does this perception then come from?  How is it propagated?  What are the ramifications?

Difficult issues like this will be a common thread in the daily discourse of this class. Students will be expected to listen respectfully, honor diverse beliefs/opinions by allowing them full voice in the classroom discussions, and support their own assertions with facts that emerge from research. While discussions may become impassioned and earnest, disrespectful behavior and language, interruptions, and rudeness will not be permitted or condoned. Civil discourse is the rule of the day.

 

HP 3152: Disney Discourse
Instructor: Susan Aronstein
Modality:
Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
Upper-division elective
USP attributes: 
(H) Human Culture
A two-part course evaluating Disney film, television, merchandise, and theme parks as cultural phenomena. In the first part of the course, students view early Disney film, and television to determine how they help construct and re-tell American history and identity. The second part of the course is focused on Disneyland as a persuasive entity, culminating with a trip to the park during which students perform independent research that incorporates a reading of the park through the lens of material and cultural rhetoric.

 

HP 3152: History of U.S. Military Theory and Operations
Instructor: Geordie Beal
Modality: Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
This course will explore the history of military thought and how it was applied to strategic and operational practice in the United States from the colonial period to the present.  While many general history courses cover specific wars from the political level, this course will focus at the military strategic and operational levels of war.  Basically put, the course will consider how the military executed the government's strategic guidance.  It will provide us a means to appreciate, consider, and debate how well the military served the nation.  This course will introduce students to a variety of the most important doctrines and theories in U.S. military history; from combined arms operations, through the American interpretation of Napoleonic practices, Sherman’s “hard hand of war,” to development of operational design and multi-domain operations.  At the conclusion of the course, students will understand how the American way of war has evolved and be able to articulate in a scholarly manner how the military applied doctrine in the support of the nation’s goals.  Grades will be based on submitted research papers (using primary and secondary sources), individual and group presentations (battle studies), class participation and short online quizzes.  Initial coordination has been done to conduct one of the battle studies at Ft. Laramie (or another site) – tentatively scheduled for Oct. 15th.  If the battlefield visit is not possible, the class will conduct a virtual battlefield visit.

 

HP 3152: Outbreaks and Pandemics
Instructor: Joslyn Cassady
Modality: Synchronous Online 
Honors College Attributes: Honors Non-Western. Note: Students who have already completed their Honors Non-Western requirement may use this course as an Honors upper-division elective
USP attributes: 
PN (Physical and Natural World)
A&S attributes: none
Join me in the timely interdisciplinary study of infectious disease outbreaks and pandemics. This course provides students with an introduction to domestic and international disease outbreaks, methodologies for public health investigation and response, and programs for pandemic preparedness. We will study the disease ecology and societal response to outbreaks such as Covid-19, Ebola, “Mad Cow” disease, and HIV/AIDS. The instructor was an Epidemic Intelligence Officer (a.k.a. “disease detective”) with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and will prioritize learning from case studies of real-world outbreak investigations.  In the end, students will gain an understanding of the staggering health challenges posed by human-animal interactions, social inequality, and environmental contamination, as well as the intervention strategies that have been developed to confront them.

 

HP 3151-41: Modes: Mass Media and Collective Consciousness
Instructor: Adrian Molina
Modality: 
Asynchronous Online
Honors College Attributes: 
Upper-division elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: none
This course explores the most central and critical issues of our times: Humanity, Technology, and Sustainability.  In this course, the student is the main "Text," meaning that each student will engage in contemplative education practices.  Students will examine their own lives in relationship to technology, mass media, social media, and how the cyborg-ification of our lives affects our physical, mental, and motional health, as well as our relationships with other humans.  

Additionally, this is a topics course that may explore any of the following: the development of collective consciousness; historical uses of propaganda; functions of mass media; the functions of corporate media vs independent media; how mass media affects public opinion; journalism and ethical considerations; pop culture's relationship to American values and standards; the nature of news coverage and news filters; access to media and social justice concerns; functions of art and entertainment; critiques of mass media and pop culture; alternative forms of media; futurist perspectives on human consciousness; ecological and environmental concerns; and real-time developments in technology. 

 

 

HP 3153: Wyoming Walkabout
Instructor: Paul Taylor
Modality: 
Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
Honors Non-Western. Note: Students who have already completed their Honors Non-Western requirement may use this course as an Honors upper-division elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: (G) Global
A unique experiential exposure to the "world's oldest living culture." Students will explore Australia's 50,000-year-old Aboriginal culture lead by educator/artist Paul Taylor. www.paultaylor.ws Mentored by elder Yidumduma Bill Harney, senior custodian of the Wardaman culture, students will be guided by video material collected over 15 years by Paul's Yubulyawan Dreaming Project. www.ydproject.com Students will study the 10 video chapters on this site and be participants in this continuing research. We will explore what it is to be indigenous, participate in ritual, song, dance and painting. We will learn the Wardaman Creation Story, applying this wisdom to our landscape and personal lives. We will have field trips to the UW Planetarium, our local Casper Aquifer and an American Indian sacred site. We will apply storytelling in class; make, play and decorate a didgeridoo. We will work together on a class mural, teaching to “Care for Country”, celebrating our land, our personal "Walkabouts", our own life journeys. *This course is a block course, completed over 9-10 weeks outside of normal class hours.

HP 4151: Neuroscience and Law Course
Instructor: Karagh Brummond
Modality: Traditional
Honors College Attributes: 
Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: PN (Physical and Natural World)

Lawyers and courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, are already integrating neuroscience research into their arguments and opinions on cases from criminal to civil litigation. This class will introduce the exciting field of "neurolaw" by covering issues such as neuroscience of criminal culpability, brain-based lie detection, brain death, emotions, decision making, and much more. Along the way we'll discuss how the legal system can and should respond to new insights on topics such as adolescent brain development, addiction, psychopathy, Alzheimer's, effects of combat on soldiers' brains, and concussions from sports injuries. Students will be pushed to determine and develop a sense of how, when, and where neuroscience can and cannot aid in the goals of law. Please note that this course will be approached from a heavy science side providing students with a deep understanding of neuroscience and the application of neuroscience literature in courtrooms. We will be looking closely at topics including the structure and function of the brain, brain monitoring and manipulation techniques, and how essential studies in neuroscience have been used by the legal system. Students will be reflecting on and drawing conclusions about the ethical and legal implications of using neuroscientific data in law through synthesis of neuroscience research.

HP 4151: Future Southwest Studies
Instructor: Adrian Molina
Modality: 
Asynchronous Online
Honors College Attributes: 
Upper-division elective
Cultural Studies is for everyone. With a wide lens on culture, arts, music, literature, film, food, social trends and political movements, this course opens a broad and inviting door to students interested in the future of the Southwest.  

The coursework naturally roots itself in Latina/o/x Studies themes. The writings of Gloria Anzaldúa will serve as foundational texts that explore race, gender, cultural identity, bilingualism, indigeneity, mestizaje (mixed identity) and spirituality from an integrated perspective, with a focus on radical imaginings of the future.  Building on this history, we will survey contemporary social, cultural, artistic and critical voices of the Southwest. What does their innovation, their work, and their movements tell us about what is now, what is new, and what is next for the Southwest? We will conclude with a look at grassroots creative and social movements that are taking on issues of immigrants’ rights, indigenous land rights, GLBTQ rights, water rights, climate change, and gentrification of Southwest cities and towns. 

 

HP 4152: Nanotechnology
Instructor: Chris Rothfuss
Modality: 
Traditional
Honors College Attributes: Upper-division elective
USP attributes: 
PN (Physical and Natural World)
A&S attributes: none
Cancer cures, space elevators, quantum computers and stain resistant ties... nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is the control, manipulation and fabrication of matter at the molecular scale – about 1 to 100 nanometers – to take advantage of unique physical phenomena. It is estimated that by the year 2015 nanotechnology will account for over $1 trillion in the global marketplace. The US Government invests $1 billion per year on nanotechnology research and development. Nanotechnology is seen by many as the next great technological revolution. So what does all that mean? What will nanotechnology do for me? How will it influence the world of the future? What research is being done today? This course will take a broad look at the development of nanotechnology; including the history, the science, the applications, the social and political impacts, and its influence on the future. All majors and disciplines are welcome!

 

HP 4152: Wildlife, Ranching, Resource Extraction – An interdisciplinary approach to figuring out how people, animals, and our environment can coexist
Instructor: Tom Grant
Modality: 
Traditional
Honors College Attributes: Upper-division elective 
Wyoming is the least populated state in the nation yet has the 10th greatest area. Wyoming developed from a past focused on land-based livelihoods (ranching) and the extraction of natural resources, yet the population demographics and economic drivers of the state are changing rapidly. How can a rural state with a fierce independence streak rise to the challenges of the 21st century?

This course will take an interdisciplinary science-based approach to explore the relationships between humans, wildlife, and the economic drivers of Wyoming. From the lens of sustainable and resilient ecosystems and economies, we’ll learn about 1) the current challenges of land-based livelihoods like ranching, 2) the future of communities reliant on oil, gas, and coal extraction, and 3) the management of natural and functioning ecosystems that support healthy wildlife populations, ecosystems, and economies.

Using field trips and guest speakers with relevant experience, we’ll dive into the environmental, social, and economic issues at the heart of these diverse and intertwined topics. You will hear about ranching from perspective of a rancher, see the changes occurring in energy production, realize the challenges of managing wildlife, and learn about how we can collaborate to find solutions that restore functioning natural ecosystems and sustainable rural economies. This course is solution oriented and will require you to complete a project that addresses some aspect of sustainability in Wyoming, preferably from a collaborative, problem-solving perspective. The course will be based on our scientific knowledge of these topics but will be accessible to students from all majors and interests. *This course will include 2-3 planned field trips over the course of the semester, times/days TBD.

 

HP-4990: Introduction to Research Methods in STEM
Instructor: Joseph Holles
Modality:
Traditional
Honors College Attributes:
Upper-division elective
USP Attributes: None
A&S Attributes: None

Wondering how to get started on the research for your honor’s thesis? No idea what you research interests are? No clue how to find a research mentor? Confused by when and where to complete the laboratory research? No idea what to do in the research laboratory? Let’s start working on these hurdles one at a time. This course provides a general approach to scientific research and graduate school preparation. Topics will include: 1) finding your research interests and a research mentor, 2) reading journal articles, and writing journal articles and a research funding proposal, 3) literature search skills, 4) using the scientific method for approaching a research problem and developing a thesis and research methodology, 5) research ethics, 6) delivering a research presentation, 7) other professional research skills, and 8) “What is graduate school?” and selecting and applying for graduate schools. This course is designed for you to take the semester before you go into the lab and start your research. Learn the above skills in advance and make your laboratory research time productive and fulfilling.

 

 HP 4152: Race and Marketing
Instructor: Eric Krszjzaniek
Modality: Traditional
Honors College Attributes:
Upper-division elective
USP Attributes: None
A&S Attributes: None
This course will use the lens of critical marketing to investigate the ways in which marketing and economic systems have appropriated and commodified the non-White human body. Throughout the history of the relatively nascent discipline of marketing, the non-White human body is exploited to create, promote, and sell products to White consumers, much to the detriment of non-dominant cultures. Using an historical perspective to see how marketing has exploited the images and bodies of minorities for profit—from images steeped in subjugation and white supremacy to hidden labor costs—we then interrogate how these practices still pervade our consumer culture today, and what the ramifications of such unconscious behaviors might be. This course uses history, marketing theory, economics, African American Studies, Native American Studies, Critical Race Theory, and other disciplines and theories as means to give fuller context to marketing decisions and actions that students—and consumers—are confronted with every day.

HP 4976: Independent Study
DOES NOT COUNT TOWARDS HONORS-COLLEGE UPPER-DIVISION ELECTIVES
Instructor: Student must identify faculty mentor and receive approval from faculty mentor and the Honors College
Modality: Various
Honors College Attributes: none
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
Why might you take an Honors independent study?  Register for one if you need the structure to help you complete your senior capstone project, if you need additional upper division elective hours to graduate, if you need additional hours to be a fulltime student in any given semester, or if you have been working with an instructor on a particularly interesting area for which there is no designated course. You can take up to 3 credit hours of an Honors independent study per semester for up to a total of 6 hours overall. 
You don’t need to sign up for an independent study to complete the senior capstone project.  Please note that these hours do not meet any specific requirements towards your degree or your Honors minorThey do not count towards the required Honors upper division electives.
Contact Us

The Honors College

Guthrie House

1200 Ivinson St.

Laramie, WY 82070

Phone: 307-766-4110

Fax: 307-766-4298

Email: honors@uwyo.edu

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