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Neuroscience Graduate Program

University of Wyoming

Department 3302

1000 E. University Ave.

Laramie, WY 82071

Email: neuroscience@wyo.edu

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Doctoral Neuroscience Program

Neuroscience Faculty

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Kara G. Pratt

Director of Neuroscience Program and Associate Professor, Department of Zoology and Physiology

I am interested in the functional development of neural circuits and how sensory input regulates this process. It has been well established that external sensory stimuli is necessary for proper circuit development and refinement, but the intracellular mechanism(s) underlying this type of plasticity are not understood.

Read more: Visit website  |  Email: kpratt4@uwyo.edu

Brenda Alexander

Brenda Alexander

Assistant Professor, Reproductive Biology

Research is focused on reproductive physiology with a focus on neuroendocrine mechanisms controlling reproduction and reproductive behavior in domestic livestock. A special emphasis of research explores the neuroendocrine control of ram reproductive behavior...

Read more: Visit website  |  Email: balex@uwyo.edu

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Ana Clara Bobadilla

Assistant Professor, School of Pharmacy

Ana Clara Bobadilla obtained her Ph.D. in neurosciences from the Pierre & Marie Curie University (now Sorbonne University) in Paris, France. Her thesis work focused on understanding the long-lasting neurobiological changes of noradrenergic and serotonergic systems induced by repeated exposure to drugs of abuse using the behavioral sensitization model in mice. She then completed her post-doctoral training at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC, Charleston, SC, USA), where she studied glutamatergic alterations driving drug seeking. In 2020, Dr. Bobadilla joined the University of Wyoming (Laramie, WY) as an Assistant Professor in the School of Pharmacy. She currently investigates the neurobiological mechanisms of relapse to drugs. Specifically, she characterizes the specific ensembles of neurons built through reward experience that drive reward-seeking behavior. By establishing whether or not addictive drugs highjack the circuitry/ensembles coding for biological rewards, these findings aim to advance fundamental understanding of goal-directed behaviors and the disorders altering them.

Read more: Visit website  |  Email: abobadil@uwyo.edu

Travis E. Brown

Travis E. Brown

Assistant Professor, School of Pharmacy

The main focus of the Brown laboratory is determining how exposure to drugs of abuse, traumatic events and painful stimuli ultimately impacts neuroplasticity. I am interested in how regulation of the extracellular matrix mediates synaptic organization and eventually behavioral output.

Read more: Visit website  |  Email: tbrown53@uwyo.edu

Jared S. Bushman

Jared S. Bushman

 Assistant Professor, School of Pharmacy

Dr. Bushman’s primary research interests are the roles of astrocytes and other glia in the central nervous system and regeneration of the central and peripheral nervous systems following traumatic injury or disease.

Read more: Visit website  |  Email: jbushman@uwyo.edu

 

Jonathan Fox

Jonathan Fox

 Professor, Department of Veterinary Science

We study molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration particularly in the context of Huntington’s disease (HD). We work primarily with genetic mouse models of HD. We use a variety of approaches to elucidate disease mechanisms including anatomic studies.

Read more: Visit Website  |  Email: Jfox7@uwyo.edu 

 

Zoltan M. Fuzessery (Emeritus)

Zoltan M. Fuzessery (Emeritus)

Professor Emeritus, Department of Zoology and Physiology

Neuroethological approach to information processing in the vertebrate auditory system, using behavioral, psychophysical, neurophysiological and neuroanatomical approaches to unravel the neural substrates for sound localization, echolocation and recognition of communication signals.

Read more: Visit website  |  Email: zmf@uwyo.edu

Yun Li

Yun Li

Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology

I am interested in understanding the biological basis of behavior. I believe that the pattern of neural activity contains some version of information, since all sensory signals are converted into neural activity, and the contents of our thoughts, emotions and knowledge are all carried by neural activity.

Read more: Visit website  |  Email: yli30@uwyo.edu

Karen Mruk

Karen Mruk

Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutical Science

Her past research investigated how potassium channels in the nervous system play a role in various afflictions, including epilepsy. Currently, her lab focuses on nervous system injury and regeneration using zebrafish as a model. Read More
Website: https://www.mruklab.org/ |  Twitter: twitter.com/MrukKaren
LinkedIn:
linkedin.com/in/kmruk  |  Email: kmruk@uwyo.edu

Sreejayan Nair

Sreejayan Nair

Professor, School of Pharmacy

My laboratory is interested in studying insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1)-mediated signal transduction in neuronal cells. Our long-range goal is to identify the role of insulin and IGF1 in neurodegenerative disorders. Read more: Visit website  |  Email: sreejay@uwyo.edu

Jonathan F. Prather

Jonathan F. Prather

Associate Professor, Department of Zoology and Physiology

The goal of my lab is to understand the neural mechanisms that enable us to communicate. This process requires that we perform and perceive complex signals, and we are only beginning to understand how those signals are processed in the central nervous system.

Read more: Visit website  |  Email: jprathe2@uwyo.edu

 

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Rae Russell

Associate Research Scientist, Department of Veterinary Sciences

The primary focus of my research is on plasticity of spinal cord circuitry and the immune response to CNS injury. I am also interested in investigating the cause of wobbly hedgehog syndrome, an idiopathic central demyelinating disease of hedgehogs.


Read more: Visit website  |  Email: rrusse19@uwyo.edu

Qian-Quan Sun

Qian-Quan Sun

Professor, Department of Zoology and Physiology

One of the amazing characters of our brain is its ability to learn and to adapt. This capacity of learning is enormous when we are young. In addition, injury to the immature brain results in much more elaborate reorganization than that observed with comparable injuries in adulthood.

Read more: Visit website  |  Email: neuron@uwyo.edu

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Baskaran “Baski” Thyagarajan

Associate Professor of Pharmaceutics and Neuroscience, School of Pharmacy

Baskaran “BASKI” Thyagarajan teaches Pharmaceutics at the School of Pharmacy, University of Wyoming. His research work focuses on the role and mechanistic regulation of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel proteins in physiology and pathophysiology of degenerative and metabolic diseases. He was previously a Research Assistant Professor with the Division of Nephrology at the University of Rochester Medical Center Department of Medicine in Rochester, Ny. Dr. Thyagarajan led the New Drug Discovery Research - Safety Pharmacology group in Ranbaxy Research Laboratories. Dr. Thyagarajan received a Bachelor of Pharmacy from Madras Medical College in Chennai, India, a Master of Pharmacy from Banaras Hindu University Institute of Technology in Varanasi, India and a Ph.D. in pharmacy from Karl-Franzens University of Graz in Austria and did postdoctoral research at the Johns Hopkins University, in Maryland. Dr. Thyagarajan has numerous publications, abstracts, and presentations and has received several awards for his research.

Read more: BaskiLab  | Phone: Office - (307) 766 6482; Lab - (307) 766 6147; Fax: (307) 766 2953  Email: bthyagar@uwyo.edu

William D. “Trey’” Todd

William D. “Trey’” Todd

Assistant Professor of Zoology and Physiology

My laboratory seeks to understand how the mammalian circadian system, and its input and output pathways, influences the daily timing of particular behaviors from sleep-wake and locomotor activity rhythms to more complex behaviors such as aggression. My research also focuses on how such circuitry is involved in neurobehavioral pathologies associated with circadian dysfunction and behavioral aggression, such as sundowning syndrome in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

Read more: Visit website  |  Email: wtodd3@uwyo.edu

Contact Us

Neuroscience Graduate Program

University of Wyoming

Department 3302

1000 E. University Ave.

Laramie, WY 82071

Email: neuroscience@wyo.edu

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1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071
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