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University Catalog

History (HIST)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 2003 USP code followed by the 2015 USP code (i.e. [QB<>Q]).

JumpLink1110. Western Civilization I. 3. [CH<>H] Surveys basics of Western European civilization from decline of Roman Empire to 1700.

1120. Western Civilization II. 3. A broad survey of European history in the Western tradition from 1700 to present.

1210. United States History I. 3. Surveys U.S. history 1607-1865. Together with HIST 1220, it is the foundation on which all U.S. history courses offered by the department are based. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 1210 and 1211.

1211. U.S. to 1865. 3. [V<>V] Surveys U.S. history through the Civil War which by itself meets the requirements of the Wyoming statutes providing for instruction in the provisions and principles of the constitutions of the United States and Wyoming. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 1210 and 1211. (Normally offered fall semester)

1220. United States History II. 3. Surveys U.S. history from reconstruction to recent past. Together with HIST 1210, it is the foundation for all U.S. history courses offered by the department. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 1220 and 1221.

1221. U.S. From 1865. 3. [V<>V] Surveys U.S. history from the Civil War to the present and meets the requirements of the Wyoming statutes providing for instruction in the provisions and principles of the constitutions of the U.S. and of Wyoming. Students cannot receive credit for both 1220 and 1221. (Normally offered spring semester)

1250. History of Wyoming. 3. A study of Wyoming from its beginning to the present. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 1250 and 1251.

1251. Wyoming History. 3. [V<>V] A survey which encourages an understanding of Wyoming history, how it relates to the history of the West and the rest of America and how it has influenced the present. An important component is to learn about the U.S. and the Wyoming constitutions and how these two documents have influenced Wyoming history. Students cannot receive credit for both HIST 1250 and 1251.

1290. History of the U.S. West. 3. An introductory survey of the American West, with consideration of developments in both the 19th and 20th centuries.

1320. World History to 1500. 3. [CS,G<>H] A history of the world's peoples and societies from human prehistory to 1500, with an emphasis on the diversity and interconnectedness of human life in the past.

1330. World History since 1500. 3. [CS,G<>{none}] A history of the world's peoples and societies from 1500 to the present, with an emphasis on the diversity and interconnectedness of human life in the past.

JumpLink2020. American Military History. 3. Surveys military experiences of U.S. from colonial period to the present. In addition to specific wars, examines military doctrines and political, social and economic forces that shaped conduct of war in American history.

2030. History and Environmental Science. 3. [{none}<>H] This course is designed as an introduction to both the historical work of environmental historians and the scientific work of environmental scientists. No previous background in either history or science is required. Cross listed with ENR 2030.

2040. Imperial China. 3. [CS,G<>{none}] Surveys China's social, intellectual, political, cultural, technological and ethnohistory from earliest historical period through the last imperial dynasty, and China's role in greater E. Asian and world history. Provides background for other Asia-related courses, and is part of year-long series; see HIST 2041.

2041. Modern China. 3. Surveys China's social, intellectual, political, cultural and ethnohistory from mid-1800s to the present. Themes include colonialism, emergence of nation-state, Communist party, Mao's socio-political agenda, post-Mao reforms and China's role in Asia. Background for other Asia-related courses and part of year-long series; see HIST 2040.

2050. Introduction to Public History. 3. Introduces the student to the non-teaching, professional uses of history. Topics for consideration include archival work, museum management, public information and publications, historic site development, oral history interviewing, preparation of government reports, historic preservation general concepts and historical programming.

2060. Topics in History. 2-3 (Max. 6). Discusses special topics that fall outside traditional chronological and geographical framework of history; content varies from semester to semester in accordance with faculty interest and student demand.

2080 [4315]. Holocaust. 3. [CH<>{none}] Survey of the destruction of European Jewry, 1933-1945. Cross listed with RELI 2080.

2105. Medieval Europe in Film. 3. Historical depictions in films help to shape people's view of the past. Uses commercial films to study major themes in the development of western European civilization between 500 and 1500. Students view, discuss and write about films, learning to evaluate films historically and to view films critically, developing media literacy.

2120. Ancient Greece and the Near East. 3. Examines development of civilization in Eastern Mediterranean from pre-history to Alexander the Great. (Offered based on sufficient demand and resources)

2130. Ancient Rome. 3. Studies history of the growth of Roman power from city-state to world power.

2225. History of Christianity. 3. Traces Christianity from its beginnings to late 20th century. Cross listed with RELI 2225.

2230. The History of Russia to 1855. 3. [CS<>{none}] General survey of modern Russian history from earliest times to 1855.

2240. The History of Russia Since 1855. 3. General survey of modern Russian history from 1855 to the present.

2250. American Religious History I (To 1865). 3. [CH,D<>H] Traces the history of religion in America through the Civil War. We will pay particular attention to the intertwining of religion and colonialism; the tension between emerging Protestant hegemony and religious pluralism; and the roles religion has played in justifying oppression and pursuing liberty in American history. Cross listed with RELI 2250.

2252. American Religious History II (1865-1945). 3. [CH,D<>H] Traces American religious history from the Civil War through WWII. Focuses on how race/ethnicity, class, gender, and national origin affected religion, and explores how Americans used religion in oppressing and liberating people; marking and erasing difference; and exporting values abroad as well as reforming society at home. Cross listed with RELI 2252.

2290. History of North American Indians. 3. [CH,D<>{none}] Studies American Indian history through 500 years and across the continent. Considers Indian political, social and economic continuity and change. Focuses on how Indian peoples experienced and responded to times of dramatic change. Cross listed with NAIS 2290.

2315. History of Non-Western Religions. 3. [CH,G<>{none}] Introduces students to religions outside the Judeo-Christian realm familiar in the west. Each religion analyzed in its world views, its ways of life, and in its social organization. History of each religion and its changes. Cross listed with RELI 2315.

2320. History of Islam. 3. [CH,G<>COM2] Focuses on the origins of Islam and its early formation, its growth and spread across the world, and its intellectual, spiritual and historical character. Time will also be spent on the formation of Islam in the modern world and how that impacts the views and actions of its members.

2360. African-American History. 3. [CH,D<>COM2] Surveys African-American history in America, particularly emphasizing issues of identity, class, and progress as well as exploring African-Americans' quest for full participation in American life. Cross listed with AAST 2360.

2370. Chicano History: Origins to 1900. 3. [CS,D<>H] General survey of the history of the Mexican American Chicano people in the United States. Examines the origins and development of Mexican Americans, Chicanos through the major historical processes which have shaped their experience. Major themes include multicultural, multiethnic context, origins; changing identity, comparative relations to other social, ethnic groups, culture, social structure, politics, economy, immigration, and the influence of United States-Mexico relations. Cross listed with CHST 2370.

2380. Latin American History 1500-2000. 3. [G<>H] Provides introduction to Latin American history, from colonial contacts to the present. Explores important themes and connections across the colonial and modern periods, such as race, national identity, foreign involvement, indigenous peoples' role in nation-states, religion, social movements, economic systems, and globalization.

2385. Chicano History : 1900 to Present. 3. [{none}<>H] General survey of the history of the Mexican American Chicano people in the United States. Examines the origins and development of Mexican Americans, Chicanos through the major historical processes which have shaped their experience. Major themes include multicultural, multiethnic context, origins; changing identity, comparative relations to other social, ethnic groups, culture, social structure, politics, economy, immigration, and the influence of United States-Mexico relations. Cross listed with CHST 2385.

2389. History of Women in the American West. 3. [D<>{none}] Surveys the roots of society's marginal historical depiction of women in the American West from the colonial period through the twentieth century. From the perspective of race, class, ethnicity, and gender, the course focuses on the development of a multi-dimensional understanding of women's roles using an interdisciplinary approach. Cross listed with WMST 2389.

2390. US West Between the World Wars. 3. Examines two pivotal decades (1918-1942) in the US West that encompasses prosperity, Depression, and reform, through the use of historical documents, art, film, literature, and music.

2460. Traditional Japan. 3. Surveys Japan's social, intellectual, political, cultural, technological and ethnohistory from earliest historical period to the 1800s. Topics include roles of China and Korea, the samurai warrior tradition, family structure, Buddhism and Shinto. Provides background for other Asia-related courses, and is part of a year-long series; see HIST 2461.

2461. Modern Japan. 3. Surveys Japan's social, intellectual, political, cultural, economic, technological and ethnohistory from the 1800s through the present. Topics include Japan's industrialization, Asian colonialism, post-WWII and Japan as economic superpower. Provides background for other Asia-related courses and is part of a year-long series; see HIST 2460.

2470. Civilization of India. 3-4 (Max. 4). Surveys Indian civilization from earliest times, including cultural aspects.

2500. The Impact of the Union Pacific on Wyoming History. Students experience and interpret the impact of the building of the Union Pacific Railroad on the history and culture of Wyoming through the lens of three disciplinary perspectives. Students explore how the railroad impacted Wyoming geography, economic development and the people of the state through personal research projects. Cross listed with ECON 2500.

2600. Forgotten Africa: Intro to African Civilizations. 3. [{none}<>H] This survey course introduces students to African states and empires, dating from classical to modern times. The course challenges depictions of Africa as timeless and underdeveloped within contemporary narratives by highlighting the continent’s vibrant cultures, sophisticated technologies, dynamic and complex political systems and participation in long-distance trade. Cross listed with ANTH 2600.

2700. Introduction to Museology. 3. [CH<>{none}] Explores the historical, cultural, and contemporary roles of museums and preservation institutions in society. Introduces students to the museum professions, collection and exhibition installation strategies, and ethical problems of governance and collection. Field trips to regional collections are included. Cross listed with AMST/ANTH/ART 2700.

JumpLink3000. Plains Culture and History. 3. [D<>{none}] An ethnohistorical study of those Native peoples inhabiting the plains region of the U.S. from prehistory to the present. Cross listed with NAIS 3000. Prerequisite: 6 hours of HIST or NAIS.

3020 [4020]. Historical Methods. 3. [L,WB<>{none}] An introduction to the concepts, methods, and techniques used by historians. The main emphasis will be on methods of historical research and analysis, demonstrated through writing. Students will write a number of short papers building skills in various areas of research, analysis, and argumentation, and one longer paper reflecting individual research. Total pages for the semester: 30-45. Prerequisite: junior class standing, 12 hours of HIST, and COM1.

3050. Athenian Democracy. 3. Examines democratic government in ancient Athens: its origins and development, its practical workings, how politics were conducted and power was gained and exercised, citizen participation, law courts, and evaluations of democracy in the ancient world and since. Cross listed with POLS/CLAS 3050. Prerequisites: WB or COM2.

3110. Modern Germany. 3. A cultural, social, and political history of German-Speaking Europe from 1789 to the present. Prerequisite: 6 hours of HIST or INST.

3160. “What Killed Socrates?”. 3. This course will reexamine Socrates’ trial in 399 BCE, widely regarded as a miscarriage of justice, in its total historic context, seeking to understand the reasons for Socrates’ conviction. In the process, it will impart a broad understanding of the cultural, philosophical, political, and legal life of classical Athens. Cross listed with CLAS/PHIL 3160. Prerequisite: WB or COM2.

3220. History of the Modern Middle East. 3. [G<>{none}] Surveys the Middle East from 1700 to the present. Emphasizes the demise of the Ottoman Empire, the rise of domination by European colonial powers, transformations in political, social, religious and cultural life, the rise of nationalist movements, the influence of oil, the growth of Islamist political groups and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Cross listed with RELI 3220. Prerequisite: 6 hours of HIST, RELI, or INST.

3230. Early Christianity: From Jesus to Church. 3. Considers the development of the Christian religion from a small Jewish sect to its place as the official religion of the Roman Empire and beyond. It examines the development of creeds, doctrines, and institutions, placing them within their historical context. Cross listed with RELI 3230. Prerequisites: RELI 1000, RELI/HIST 2225, or HIST 2113.

3235. Medieval Christianity. 3. Traces the development of ‘Christendom' in Europe between about 500 - 1500 CE, concentrating on the Latin West. It examines the growth of Christian institutions and practices, the Church's role as sole governing entity, along with conflicts with secular governments as they developed in later centuries. Cross listed with RELI 3235. Prerequisites: RELI/HIST 2225, HIST 1110, or RELI 1000.

3240. Reformation and Enlightenment Christianity. 3. The years between about 1500 and 1800 saw the permanent dismantling of Christianity in the West as a unified force, as Protestantism brought new ways of viewing the relationship between God and humanity. Once the fragmentation began, it accelerated rapidly as Enlightenment thinking challenged Christianity in new and complex ways. Cross listed with RELI 3240. Prerequisites: RELI 1000, RELI/HIST 2225.

3275. World Christianities. 3. [CH,G<>{none}] Examines the development of Christianity primarily in Africa, Asia and South America. Cross listed with RELI 3275. Prerequisites: WB and CH.

3300. Secret History of Science. 3. Explores developments in science from prehistory to the present. It focuses on the lesser-known men and women who contributed to science, as well as on seemingly superstitious beliefs that were nonetheless important to advances in knowledge. Restricted to junior standing or higher. Prerequisite: 6 hours in HIST or 6 hours of PN coursework, or a combination of both.

3400. Mongol Empire. 3. Examines the history of the Mongol Empire from a world history perspective. Major themes: structure of a nomadic empire, how that empire interacted with the various settled states it conquered and ramifications of the Mongol conquest on trade, technology, and social and intellectual developments across Eurasia, between the years 1200 to 1450 ce. Prerequisite: 6 hours of HIST.

3500. Colonial America. 3. This course covers the history of European colonization from roughly 1492 to 1763. Our geographic focus will be on the (future) United States, but will also learn how transatlantic forces influenced its people. Prerequisite: 12 hours of HIST courses or permission of instructor.

3670. African Diaspora. 3. Examines the process through which aspects of African culture have endured in the Diaspora. Analyzes the social relations between Diaspora Africans and non-African populations in North and South America, the Caribbean, Britain, Asia, and the Mediterranean. Cross listed with AAST 3670. Prerequisites: AAST 1000, any AAST 2000 level course, or AAST/HIST 2360.

3880. Comparative History. 3. Explores comparative history from a variety of topics, such as colonialism, memory, nationalisms, frontiers, or cultural history. This course will introduce students to at least one of these themes from at least two regions, time periods, or groups of people to understand patterns and change in human societies through time. Prerequisite: 6 hours of HIST.

JumpLink4000. Indians of Wyoming. 3. [D<>{none}] Examines Native American culture in Wyoming from pre-history to the 21st century. Analyzes social, political, and economic developments of Native peoples of Wyoming before, during, and after contact with Europeans. Discusses interaction between these diverse societies and explores the changing relationships between Indians and Euro-Americans through the periods after contact. Cross listed with NAIS 4000; dual list with HIST 5000. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST or NAIS.

4020. The Black West. 3. [CH,D<>{none}] This course explores the historical experiences and contributions of people of African descent to the American West from their earliest recorded presence in the 16th Century through the present. Cross listed with AAST 4020. Prerequisites: AAST 1000, any AAST 2000-level course, junior/senior standing, or three hours of any level of HIST course.

4030. Senior Capstone Seminar. 3 (Max. 6). [{none}<>COM3] For undergraduate departmental majors; presented in a small group, non-lecture setting. Under close instructor supervision, students write reviews and essays, present critiques and oral reports and lead discussion on materials read by class. Prerequisite: advanced standing as a History major and HIST 3020.

4055. Archival Research Methods. 3. Students will master advanced research strategies with interdisciplinary applications. Focuses on primary research and the development of advanced skills in information literacy, critical analysis of sources, verification of evidence, techniques for researching underdocumented populations, and interpretation of historical evidence. Advanced writing and oral presentation skills are emphasized. Dual listed with HIST 5055. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST, including HIST 2050 or HIST 2700.

4060. Independent Study. 1-3 (Max. 6). Credit not to exceed 6 hours maximum, to be arranged in either European or American history. Primarily for juniors and seniors who can profit from independent work with minimal supervision. Prerequisites: 12 semester hours in history; written permission of instructor required. (Offered fall, spring and summer)

4077. Book History: Topics. 3 (Max. 6). An in-depth, hands-on study of books within their historical contexts. The topic will vary each time and focus on a particular theme, time period, place, or culture. Taught at the Rare Books Library, American Heritage Center, using original books or facsimiles. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4100. Early Medieval Europe. 3. Studies development of European civilization from decline of Rome to 12th century. Dual listed with HIST 5100. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4110. The High Middle Ages. 3. Studies history of European civilization between the 12th and 15th centuries. Dual listed with HIST 5110. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4112. History of the Medieval City. 3. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, cities virtually disappeared from Western Europe. Around 1000 Europe began its rise to world prominence and cities contributed to that rise. Examines development of cities in medieval Europe and explores life within those cities. Dual listed with HIST 5112. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4113. Medieval Religious Dissent. 3. Religious dissent in the Middle Ages included what we would call heresy, but also encompasses such marginal groups as Jews and witches. Examines development of orthodoxy and persecution of religious diversity between eleventh and 16th centuries within the historical context of the times. Dual listed with HIST 5113. Cross listed with RELI 4113. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST or RELI.

4120. Europe During the Renaissance. 3. Intensely studies European history in 14th and 15th centuries. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4130. Europe During the Reformation. 3. Intensely studies European history in the 16th century. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4140. Europe During the Age of the Baroque. 3. Intensely studies European history in 17th century. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4150. Europe During the Age of the Enlightenment. 3. Intensely studies European history in 18th century. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4170. Europe in the Nineteenth Century. 3. An intensive study of European history from the beginning of the nineteenth century through to the origins of the First World War in 1914. Dual listed with HIST 5170. Prerequisite: HIST 1120.

4174. Judaism from Ezra to Jesus. 3. This course focuses on the religious and historical development of Judaism during the centuries between the end of the Old Testament and the New Testament, studying the arrival of Greek and then Roman culture and the changes Judaism underwent during that time that endure today. Cross listed with RELI 4174. Prerequisites: WB or COM2, and RELI 1000 or RELI 2110.

4175. Judaism at the Dawn of Christianity. 3. Judaism is the only Mediterranean religion that was practiced in the ancient world as well as in Late Antiquity and beyond. This course helps students analyze how Judaism was able to change and adapt at key moments to provide its adherents with an active, living religion that addressed their needs. Cross listed with RELI 4175. Prerequisites: RELI 1000 or RELI 2110, and junior standing.

4180. Europe in the 20th Century. 3. An intensive study of European history from 1914 through 2000. Dual listed with HIST 5180. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST. 

4270. France: Old Regime and Revolution. 3. The social, political and cultural history of early modern France (1598-1789), from the rise of the Absolutist state under Louis XIV to the outbreak of the Revolution. Explores the cultural and intellectual shifts from court culture at Versailles, to the Enlightenment, to the rise of revolutionary ideologies. Dual listed with HIST 5270. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4290. History of the Soviet Union. 3. Depicts Russia under Communism, including particularly the development of totalitarian dictatorship in its political, economic, social and cultural manifestations. Dual listed with HIST 5290. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4305. Global History. 3. [G<>{none}] Thematically focused examinations of interactions or parallel phenomena in multiple world regions. Courses may be comparative (comparing two empires, or multiple revolutions), or may examine the growth of a particular trend globally (e.g. abolition of slavery), or the interaction of many states (e.g. the Cold War). Dual listed with HIST 5305. Prerequisites: 9 hours of HIST, INST, or POLS.

4310. World War II in Europe. 3. Covers the origins, course and consequences of one of this century's defining global developments. World War II in Europe was a transnational development which shaped the world as it is known today. Dual listed with HIST 5310. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4315. History, Politics and Memory of the Holocaust in Europe. 3. Offers students the opportunity to learn about the history of the Holocaust through travel to various sites in Central Europe where the events themselves occurred, such as Berlin, Warsaw, Krakow and Auschwitz-Birkenau. Dual listed with HIST 5315. Cross listed with INST 4315. Prerequisites: 9 hours of HIST or INST.

4320. Memory and National Identity in Twentieth Century Europe. 3. Europe in the twentieth century saw a century of unprecedented violence. Examines the public representation of such historical trauma through the concept of "collective memory" and focuses in particular on how memory has become a contested part of defining identity in modern-day Europe. Dual listed with HIST 5320. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4330. European Gender and Women's History. 3. The experiences of women and the history of gender from the Renaissance through the 19th century. Focuses on the changing notions of the masculine and the feminine through such historical episodes as the Reformation, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution. Cross listed with WMST 4330. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4335. Women and Islam. 3. Examines women's lives in Islamic societies from the seventh century to the present in the Middle East and throughout the world. Themes include women's position in Islamic law, society and culture, Western images of Muslim women, veiling and Islamist movements, theoretical readings on power, gender and agency. Cross listed with RELI 4335 and WMST 4335. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST, WMST, INST or RELI.

4340 [4840]. The Social History of American Women. 3. [{none}<>H] Explores everyday life experiences of American women from the 17th century to the present. Focuses on the complex influence of gender, race and class in shaping those experiences; also, analyzes the ways in which women's dissatisfaction with their position in society formed the basis for the development of American feminism and led to the formation of an organized women's movement. Dual listed with HIST 5340. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST or WMST.

4380. International History of Human Rights. 3. Examine the modern history of human rights in the global system, with particular empahsis on developments since the Second World War. Topics include the philosophy of human rights ideas; the histories of rights and rights violations in various regions; and the resulting international responses. Dual listed with HIST 5380; cross listed with INST 4380. Prerequisites: 9 hours of HIST or INST.

4400. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 12). The internship allows students to gain hands-on experience that will help to bridge the gap between history as an academic discipline and history as practiced in museums, public history agencies and historic sites. Specific arrangements must be made in advance to identify the academic component of the internship and the grading criteria. Such planning will be done in consultation with the department's internship director. Prerequisites: 9 hours of HIST.

4405. American Encounters to 1850. 3. [D<>H] The history of America as a history of continuous encounters. Examines the history of the American people by focusing on a series of critical encounters between Native American, European, African and Asian people from pre-contact through the mid-19th century. Dual listed with HIST 5405. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4406. American Encounters from 1850. 3. [D<>H] The history of America as a history of continuous encounters. Examines the history of the American people by focusing on a series of critical encounters between Native American, European, African, and Asian people from the mid-19th century to the present. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4410. America in an Early Modern World. 3. [CS,G<>H] Explores the American colonial experience as part of a worldwide process of colonial encounters with indigenous peoples between 1400 and 1800. Compares the experiences of early modern colonization in North and South America, Asia, and the Pacific and examines the nature of the colonial societies created by these cross-cultural relationships. Dual listed with HIST 5410. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST. 

4412. Global Environment History. 3. [{none}<>H] This course is designed to introduce undergraduate and graduate students to the new field of global environmental history. The Global Environmental History course will provide a new way of looking at humans, animals, and the lives they've built in the environment and the costs of their decisions to the environment. Dual listed with HIST 5412; cross listed with ENR 4412. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST or ENR.

4415. Entangled Worlds, Entangled Lives: Indigenous People and Colonizers Before 1850. 3. [{none}<>H] The experiences of indigenous people and colonizers in Africa, Eurasia, the Americas, and the Pacific as they forged new colonial societies in the first global age (1400-1850). Emphasis throughout the course will be on the often-overlooked role of indigenous people in creating colonial societies. Dual listed with HIST 5415. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4425. Britain’s Global Empires: 1558 to the Present. 3. Britain’s four distinctive empires from Elizabeth I through the present. Emphasis throughout the course will be on the creation and operation of these distinctive but related empires with a special focus on the impact empires had on both colonized people and the people of Britain. Dual listed with HIST 5425. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4450. The Civil War and Reconstruction. 3. Studies crisis of the Union, 1861-1877. Examines experiences of both the North and South during the Civil War and restoration of the Union after the war. Dual listed with HIST 5450. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4460. Post-Civil War America: The Gilded Age. 3. Intensively covers economic, cultural and political developments which marked the U.S. in post-Civil War era, such as rise of industry, emergence of distinctive national culture and party struggles shaping America's Gilded Age. Dual listed with HIST 5460. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4462. American Indian History to 1783. 3. [{none}<>H] Surveys the history of American Indians from the period before contact to the end of the American Revolution. Examines the various contacts between American Indians and Europeans and considers what the American Revolution meant to the continent's Native peoples. Dual listed with HIST 5462; cross listed with NAIS 4462. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST or NAIS.

4463. American Indian History 1783-1890. 3. [{none}<>H] Surveys the history of American Indians during the era of westward expansion. Examines the impact of American westward movement and also the manifold changes that accompanied moving west. Dual listed with HIST 5463; cross listed with NAIS 4463. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST or NAIS.

4464. American Indians in the Twentieth Century. 3. Surveys the history of American Indians during the twentieth century. Examines the development of new cultural, social and political forms that help create an American Indian identity. Dual listed with HIST 5464; cross listed with NAIS 4464. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST or NAIS.

4466. American Indian Ethnohistory. 3. Surveys ethnohistorical methods and concepts and provides students concrete opportunities to use these methodologies in writing exercises. American Indian ethnohistory explores Native American experiences within their own cultural contexts. Cross listed with NAIS 4466. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST, NAIS, or ANTH.

4468. American Indians in the North American West. 3. One of the defining features of the North American West is the presence of American Indians. Through the discussion of varied readings and primary document research, the history of American Indians in the West is examined, with particular emphasis on the Great Plains and California. Cross listed with NAIS 4468; dual listed with HIST 5468. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST or NAIS.

4470. The Birth of Modern America, 1890-1929. 3. Studies political and diplomatic developments in the U.S. in the wake of industrialization and massive immigration. Some attention to cultural and social themes. Emphasizes shifting nature of reform between depression of the 1890s and that of the 1930s. Dual listed with HIST 5470. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4475 [4670]. American Environmental History. 3. Explores history of American attitudes and actions toward the land and natural resources. Dual listed with HIST 5475. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4480. Growth of Modern America, 1929-1960. 3. Studies political and diplomatic developments in the U.S. in Depression, World War II and early Cold War periods. Some attention to cultural and social themes. Emphasizes economic crisis, growth of government, reform traditions, anti-communism and civil rights. Dual listed with HIST 5480. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4485. U.S. Latino Diaspora. Combines classroom activities and a week-long stay abroad in examining the historical creation and contemporary spread of the Latino Diaspora from the Caribbean to the Yucatan and beyond. U.S. Latina/o history, multiculturalism, pan-Latino identity, assimilation, migration trends and natives responses are stressed. Cross listed with CHST/INST 4485. Prerequisite: 9 hours of CHST, HIST, and/or INST related coursework.

4490. Modern America, 1960-Present. 3. Studies political and diplomatic aspects of the U.S. since 1960. Emphasizes impact of Cold War, social and political tensions at home, civil rights and government policies. Dual listed with HIST 5490. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4492. Revolutions in Latin America. 3. Explores the meaning and impact of revolution in Latin America's modern history, focusing on political ideology, cultural expression, foreign relations, human rights, and globalization. Offers in-depth analysis of revolutions from the early nineteenth century to the present. Cross listed with CHST 4492; dual listed with HIST 5492. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST or INST.

4494. The U.S. in Latin America. 3. [{none}<>H] This course explores Latin America’s experiences with the United States during the twentieth century. The class addresses U.S.-Latin American relations from a variety of angles, covering topics from military intervention and government policies, to informal imperialism and cultural exchanges through film and literature. Dual listed with HIST 5494. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST or INST.

4495 [4720]. Borderlands in Latin America. 3. Examines borderlands and frontiers in Latin American history, focusing on the U.S.-Mexico border region, the Southern Cone, and the Caribbean. Key issues include cultural contact zones, colonialism, military expansion and conflict, and nation-building. Dual listed with HIST 5495. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST or INST.

4496 [4800]. History of Mexico. 3. Intensive course in Mexican development. Emphasizes the 20th century especially the Mexican Revolution of 1910, showing how this nation transformed itself into a modern nation-state. Includes diplomatic relations with the U.S., incorporation of Indians, church-state relations, uses of land and other natural resources, role of the military and growth of Mexican nationalism. Dual listed with HIST 5496; cross listed with LTST 4496. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST or INST.

4505 [4500]. The Old South, 1820-1861. 3. Studies history of the South from emergence of southern identity to the Civil War, Emphasizes southern society and culture. Dual listed with HIST 5505. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4510 [4950]. Modern East Asia. 3. Focuses on the emergence of the modern East Asian states China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam as individual states and members of this important region historically and in contemporary era, understanding the emergence of those states as responses to internal forces and external pressures such as imperialism, nationalism, Communism and Capitalism. Dual listed with HIST 5510. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4515 [4710]. American Legal History. 3. An intensive course in the history of American law, the judicial system, the legal profession and legal administration from colonial times to the present. Dual listed with HIST 5515. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4530 [4630]. 19th Century American West. 3. A study of the westward movement with emphasis on the trans-Mississippi West. Dual listed with HIST 5530. Prerequisites: 9 hours of HIST.

4535. History of Oil. 3. Intensive study of the history of oil development throughout the world. Emphasizes comparative studies of the industry as it developed in various parts of the world and during various time periods, from pre-historic times to the present. The Wyoming oil/energy mineral history is an important component. Dual listed with HIST 5535. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4540 [4640]. 20th Century American West. 3. A study of the modern American West, with consideration of social, economic and political continuity and change. Dual listed with HIST 5540. Prerequisites: 9 hours of HIST.

4545. The Multicultural West. 3. Explores the American West as a meeting ground of diverse peoples and their diverse cultures. Focuses on the sustained cross-cultural interchange between Native Americans, Euro-Americans, African Americans, Latin Americans, and Asian Americans from trans-Appalachia to the Pacific Coast from the eighteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4560. American Social History in the 20th Century. 3. Explores history of social mobility and conflict in 20th century. Emphasizes impact of industrialization, rapid urbanization, massive immigration, ethnic minorities, race, religion, women and the family, painting and architecture. Dual listed with HIST 5560. Prerequisites: 9 hours of HIST.

4582. 20th Century U.S. Foreign Relations. 3. Studies Twentieth Century United States foreign relations with a focus on the Cold War period. Examines economic sources of policy decisions, elites and mass public opinion, as well as cultural, religious, ethnic, racial, and gender issues. Cross listed with INST 4582. Dual listed with HIST 5582. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

4610. Seminar Topics in the History of Wyoming I. 3. An intensive research and writing course dealing with topics in the period before statehood in 1890. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST, includig HIST 1251.

4620. Seminar Topics in the History of Wyoming II. 3. Allows students to do intensive research and writing dealing with topics in Wyoming history from 1890 to present. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST, including HIST 1251.

4965. Senior Thesis. 3. Working closely with a faculty advisor, a history major will develop a research proposal that, after approval by the History department faculty, will lead to in-depth research and writing, producing a minimum 50-page thesis that demonstrates an excellent grasp of historical methods and a high degree of writing skill. Prerequisites: 12 hours of HIST; senior class standing; HIST major.

4990 [4080]. Topics in _____. 1-6 (Max. 12). Affords students opportunity to study in-depth various topics in history not offered in regular courses or independent study. Prerequisite: 9 hours of HIST.

JumpLink5000. Indians of Wyoming. 3. Examines Native American culture in Wyoming from pre-history to the 21st century. Analyzes social, political, and economic developments of Native peoples of Wyoming before, during, and after contact with Europeans. Discusses interaction between these diverse societies and explores the changing relationships between Indians and Euro-Americans through the periods after contact. Dual listed with HIST 4000. Prerequisite: 6 hours of HIST or NAIS.

5055. Archival Research Methods. 3. Students master advanced research strategies with interdisciplinary applications. Focuses on primary document research and the development of advanced skills in information literacy, critical analysis of sources, verification of evidence, techniques for researching underdocumented populations, and interpretation of historical evidence. Advanced writing and oral presentation skills are emphasized. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5077. Book History: Topics. 3. An in-depth, hands on study of books within their historical contexts. The topic varies each time, and focuses on a particular theme, time period, place, or culture. Taught at the Rare Books Library, American Heritage Center, using original books or facsimiles. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5100. Early Medieval Europe. 3. The study of the development of European civilization from the decline of Rome to the twelfth century. Dual listed with HIST 4100. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5110. The High Middle Ages. 3. Studies history of European civilization between the 12th and 15th centuries. Dual listed with HIST 4100. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5112. History of the Medieval City. 3. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, cities virtually disappeared from Western Europe. Around 1000, Europe began its rise to world prominence, and the birth of the cities contributed to that rise. This course examines the development of cities in medieval Europe and explores life within those cities. Dual listed with HIST 4112. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5113. Medieval Religious Dissent. 3. Religious dissent in the Middle Ages included what we would call heresy, but also encompasses such marginal groups as Jews and witches. This course examines development of orthodoxy and the persecution of religious diversity between the 11th and 16th centuries. It also studies the historical context of the times. Dual listed with HIST 4113; cross listed with RELI 4113. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5170. Europe in the 19th Century. 3. An intensive study of European history from the beginning of the nineteenth century through to the origins of the First World War in 1914. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5180. Europe in the 20th Century. 3. An intensive treatment of European history from 1914 through 2000. Dual listed with HIST 4180. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5270. France: Old Regime and Revolution. 3. The social, political and cultural history of early modern France (1598-1789), from the rise of the Absolutist state under Louis XIV to the outbreak of the Revolution. Explores the cultural and intellectual shifts from court culture at Versailles, to the Enlightenment, to the rise of revolutionary ideologies. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5290. History of the Soviet Union. 3. Russia under Communism, including particularly the development of totalitarian dictatorship in its political, economic, social, and cultural manifestations. Dual listed with HIST 4290. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5305. Global History. 3. Thematically focused examinations of interactions or parallel phenomena in multiple world regions. Courses may be comparative (comparing two empires, or multiple revolutions), or may examine the growth of a particular trend globally (e.g. abolition of slavery), or the interaction of many states (e.g. the Cold War). Dual listed with HIST 4305. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5310. World War II in Europe. 3. Covers the origins, course, and consequences of one of this century's defining global developments. World War II in Europe was a transnational development which shaped the world as we know it today. Dual listed with HIST 4310. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5315. History, Politics and Memory of the Holocaust in Europe. 3. Offers students the opportunity to learn about the history of the Holocaust as they visit various sites in Central Europe where the events themselves occurred, such as Berlin, Warsaw, Krakow and Auschwitz-Birkenau. Dual listed with HIST 4315. Cross listed with INST 5315. Prerequisites: graduate standing.

5320. Memory and National Identity in 20th Century Europe. 3. Europe in the twentieth century saw a century of unprecedented violence. Examines the public representation of such historical trauma through the concept of "collective memory" and focuses in particular on how memory has become a contested part of defining national identity in modern-day Europe. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5340. The Social History of American Women. 3. Explores the everyday life experiences of American women from the seventeenth century to the present with a focus on the complex influence of gender, race, and class in shaping those experiences. The course then turns to an analysis of the ways in which woman's dissatisfaction with the position in society formed American feminism and lead to the formation or an organized women's movement. Dual listed with HIST 4340. Prerequisites: graduate standing.

5380. International History of Human Rights. 3. Examine the modern history of human rights in the global system, with particular empahsis on developments since the Second World War. Topics include the philosophy of human rights ideas; the histories of rights and rights violations in various regions; and the resulting international responses. Dual listed with HIST 4380; cross listed with INST 5380. Prerequisites: 9 hours of HIST or INST. 

5381. Seminar in Recent United States History. 3 (Max. 12). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5400. Graduate Topics in History. 1-6 (Max. 12). Opportunity to study in-depth various topics in history not offered in regular graduate seminars or graduate reading courses. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5405. American Encounters to 1850. 3. The history of America as a history of continuous encounters. Examines the history of the American people by focusing on a series of critical encounters between Native American, European, African, and Asian people from pre-contact to the mid-19th century. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5406. American Encounters from 1850. 3. The history of America as a history of continuous encounters. Examines the history of the American people by focusing on a series of critical encounters between Native American, European, African, and Asian people from the mid-19th century to the present. Dual listed with HIST 4406. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5410. America in an Early Modern World. 3. [CS,G<>{none}] Explores the American colonial experience as part of a worldwide process of colonial encounters with indigenous peoples between 1400 and 1800. Compares the experiences of early modern colonization in North and South America, Asia, and the Pacific and examines the nature of the colonial societies created by these cross-cultural relationships. Dual listed with HIST 4410. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5412. Global Environment History. 3. [{none}<>H] This course is designed to introduce undergraduate and graduate students to the new field of global environmental history. The Global Environmental History course will provide a new way of looking at humans, animals, and the lives they've built in the environment and the costs of their decisions to the environment. Dual listed with HIST 4412. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5415. Entangled Worlds, Entangled Lives: Indigenous People and Colonizers Before 1850. 3. The experiences of indigenous people and colonizers in Africa, Eurasia, the Americas, and the Pacific as they forged new colonial societies in the first global age (1400-1850). Emphasis throughout the course will be on the often-overlooked role of indigenous people in creating colonial societies. Dual listed with HIST 4415. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5425. Britain’s Global Empires: 1558 to the Present. 3. Britain’s four distinctive empires from Elizabeth I through the present. Emphasis throughout the course will be on the creation and operation of these distinctive but related empires with a special focus on the impact empires had on both colonized people and the people of Britain. Dual listed with HIST 4425. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5450. The Civil War and Reconstruction. 3. A study of the crisis of the Union, 1861-1877. Examination of the experiences of both the North and the South during the Civil War and restoration of the Union after the war. Dual listed with HIST 4450. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5460. Post-Civil War America: The Gilded Age. 3. An intensive study in the economic, cultural, and political developments which marked the U.S. in post-Civil War era, the rise of industry, the emergence of a distinctive national culture and the party struggles that shaped America's Gilded Age. Dual listed with HIST 4460. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5462. American Indian History to 1783. 3. Surveys the history of American Indians from the period before contact to the end of the American Revolution. Examines the various contacts between American Indians and Europeans and considers what the American revolution meant to the continent's Native peoples. Dual listed with HIST 4462; cross listed with NAIS 5462. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5463. American Indian History to 1890. 3. Surveys the history of American Indians during the era of westward expansion. Examines the impact of American westward movement and also the manifold changes that accompanied Indians moving west. Dual listed with HIST 4463. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5464. American Indians in the 20th Century. 3. Surveys the history of American Indians during the twentieth century. Examines the development of new cultural, social and political forms that help create an American Indian identity. Dual listed with HIST 4464; cross listed with NAIS 5464. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5470. The Birth of Modern America, 1890-1929. 3. Studies political and diplomatic developments in the U.S. in the wake of industrialization and massive immigration. Some attention to cultural and social themes. Emphasizes shifting nature of reform between the depression of the 1890s and that of the 1930s. Dual listed with HIST 4470. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5475. American Environmental History. 3. History of American attitudes and actions toward the land and natural resources. Dual listed with HIST 4475. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5480. Growth of Modern America, 1929-1960. 3. A political and diplomatic overview of the United States in Depression, World War II and early Cold War periods. Some attention to cultural and social themes. Emphasis on economic crisis, growth of government, reform traditions, anti-communism, and civil rights. Dual listed with HIST 4480. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5490. Modern America, 1960 to Present. 3. A political and diplomatic overview of the United States since 1960 with emphasis on impact of Cold War social and political tensions at home, civil rights, and government policies. Dual listed with HIST 4490. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5492. Revolutions in Latin America. 3. Explores the meaning and impact of revolution in Latin America's modern history, focusing on political ideology, cultural expression, foreign relations, human rights, and globalization. Offers in-depth analysis of revolutions from the early nineteenth century to the present. Dual listed with HIST 4492. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5494. The U.S. in Latin America. 3. This course explores Latin America’s experiences with the United States during the twentieth century. The class addresses U.S.-Latin American relations from a variety of angles, covering topics from military intervention and government policies, to informal imperialism and cultural exchanges through film and literature. Dual listed with HIST 4494. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5495. Borderlands in Latin America. 3. Examines borderlands and frontiers in Latin American history, focusing on the U.S.-Mexico border region, the Southern Code, and the Caribbean. Key issues include cultural contact zones, colonialism, military expansion and conflict, and nation-building. Dual listed with HIST 4495. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5496. History of Mexico. 3. Intensive course in Mexican development. Emphasizes the 20th century especially the Mexican Revolution of 1910, showing how this nation transformed itself, into a modern nation state. Includes diplomatic relations with the U.S., incorporation of Indians, church-state relations, uses of land and other an natural resources, role of the military and growth of Mexican nationalism. Dual listed with HIST 4496. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5500. Readings in Women's Studies. 3. An interdisciplinary course at the graduate level focusing on feminist criticism and theory, which draws on current debates in feminist analysis from the general areas of history, literature, and social science, to inform students of reformulations of research and unresolved issues. Dual listed with WMST 5500. Prerequisites: graduate standing.

5505. The Old South, 1820-1861. 3. The history of the South from the emergence of southern identity to the Civil War, with emphasis on southern society and culture. Dual listed with HIST 4505. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5510. Modern East Asia. 3. Focuses on the emergence of the modern East Asian states China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam as individual states and members of this important region historically and in contemporary era, understanding the emergence of those states as responses to internal forces and external pressures such as imperialism, nationalism, Communism and Capitalism. Dual listed with HIST 4510. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5515. American Legal History. 3. An intensive study in the history of American law, the judicial system, the legal profession, and legal administration from colonial times to the present. Dual listed with HIST 4515. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5530. 19th Century American West. 3. A study of the westward movement with emphasis on the trans-Mississippi West. Dual listed with HIST 4530. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5535. History of Oil. 3. An intensive study in the history of oil development throughout the world. Emphasizes comparative studies of the industry as it developed in various parts of the world and during various time periods, from pre-historic times to the present. The Wyoming oil/energy mineral history will be an important component of the course. Dual listed with HIST 4535. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5540. 20th Century American West. 3. A study of the modern American West, with consideration of social, economic and political continuity and change. Dual listed with HIST 4540. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5555. American Encounters. 3. Examines the centrality of cross-cultural interchange in American history by focusing on a series of critical encounters between American, European, African, and Asian people from the 16th century to the present. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5560. American Social History in the 20th Century. 3. History of social mobility and conflict in the 20th century. Special emphasis on impact of industrialization, rapid urbanization, massive immigration, ethnic minorities, race, religion, women and the family, painting, and architecture. Dual listed with HIST 4560. Prerequisites: graduate standing.

5582. 20th Century U.S. Foreign Relations. 3. Studies Twentieth Century United States foreign relations with a focus on the Cold War period. Examines economic sources of policy decisions, elites and mass public opinion, as well as cultural, religious, ethnic racial and gender issues. Dual listed with HIST 4582; cross listed with INST 5582. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5585. Conference on U.S. History. 1-3 (Max. 6). A reading and writing course designed to allow advanced students to investigate shifting ideas about important topics in 20th century American history. Primary focus varies from semester to semester, but will be designated in the class schedule. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5600. Graduate Readings. 1-6 (Max. 12). Fulfills two purposes in our graduate program in history. It allows students to do independent directed reading in preparation for their graduate examination in history and provides students with a flexible alternative to their programs to meet and complete requirements. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5605. Conference on Wyoming and the West. 1-4 (Max. 9). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5620. Conference on Middle-Period and United States History. 1-4 (Max. 9). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5630. Seminar on Western American History. 3. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5645. Seminar on American Indian History. 3. Research seminar on American Indian history. The focus of the seminar may vary, but emphasis will usually be given to American Indians of the western United States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5660. Conference on Early Modern Europe. 1-4 (Max. 9). The student, in consultation with the instructor, chooses a topic on which he/she reads extensively. The instructor provides bibliographical guidance. Normally the student discusses the reading at length with the instructor once a week. Written analysis of the reading may also be required. The course may be offered to a group of students who need extensive reading to go with the research experience they are receiving in seminars. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5670. Seminar on Early American History. 3. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5675. Seminar on Middle-Period U.S. History. 3. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5685. Conference on European 19th and 20th Century History. 1-4. Available for a maximum of 9 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5810. Seminar on Latin American History. 1-4 (Max. 12). Students will select a topic of interest within the general field of Latin America and read the published works which deal with the subject. Instructor will direct this reading through the preparation of bioliography. Students then prepare an in-depth research paper based on pimary source documents. Research paper will treat an aspect of the subject under investigation that has not been dealt with in published materials. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5880. History Theory. 3. Intensive reading and writing course, designed to introduce graduate students to influential recent historical works, and to the faculty of the department and their research areas. Students will explore historical theories and the historiography of particular topics. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3 (Max. 3). Work in classroom with a major professor. Students are expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5910. Seminar in History Profession. 3. This seminar introduces graduate students to the profession of history through targeted readings, projects, guest speakers, and workshops. Topics covered include: archival research and source analysis, schools of thought and methodologies used by professional historians, career options in history, college teaching and course design, grant applications, and professional networking. Prerequisite: graduate standing in history.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5959. Enrichment Studies. 1-3 (Max. 99). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisite: enrollment in a graduate degree program.

5990. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 24). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

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