Skip to Main Navigation. Each navigation link will open a list of sub navigation links.

Skip to Main Content

Apply Now to the University of Wyoming apply now
Visit Campus
Download UW Viewbook
Give to UW
Menu
Contact Us

Institutional Communications

Bureau of Mines Building, Room 137

Laramie

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: (307) 766-2929

Email: cbaldwin@uwyo.edu

Find us on Facebook (Link opens a new window) Find us on Twitter (Link opens a new window)

Wyoming Business Tips for Aug. 10-25

August 15, 2019

A weekly look at issues facing Wyoming business owners and entrepreneurs from the Wyoming Small Business Development Center (SBDC) Network, a collection of business assistance programs at the University of Wyoming.

By Sarah Hamlin, regional director, Wyoming SBDC Network

In our current age of rapid information and automation, it’s easy to forget how we used to communicate with our community. As a business owner, understanding the difference between your online audience and your online community is an important distinction.

If you have heard me say it once, you have heard me say it 100 times: As a small-business owner, you need to have an understanding of your target market and audience. Knowing both the emotional and environmental factors that drive your audience to purchase decisions is the backbone to your success. With a well-defined audience, we can make a well-defined marketing strategy. That being said, your audience is largely passive. The way they consume your content and your dialogue is exclusively one-way.

When your audience starts to comment on your content, share it, engage with it and continue to come back for more -- then you have an online community. Building an online community around a specific topic that relates to your business helps increase your customer retention, lead generation and audience reach.

Your community as a resource: An active community is full of discussion, and this sharing becomes a resource for your customers. It is a place where they can come for tips and advice.

You will learn from you community: By observing the questions and comments from your community, you can learn a lot about the pain points of your customers. Additionally, this is a great group to go to for questions about products, new services, etc. Use your community to get to know your audience better.

Communities foster customer retention: By helping your customers feel more connected, they also will feel more invested in your brand. Don’t underestimate the value of the emotional bond you can create with your community. This leads to brand advocates, repeat business and referrals.

Here are a couple of tips to help you get started:

-- Decide where you will host your community. Will you use a free platform (like Facebook or YouTube) or an owned platform (a community forum)? There are pros and cons with both. With a free platform, users do not have to pay to join and you have a potential audience already spending time there. That being said, you are subject to the platform changes of the company that hosts the platform. We have seen a lot of this in the last two years with examples like Facebook. An owned platform allows you complete branding and messaging control, but you do have to find your audience and convince them to join you.

-- Set the tone of your group, ask good questions, and encourage your members to invite their friends. Spend time creating the rules for your group. Remember, you want your audience to see this as a place that is both informational and safe to connect with like-minded individuals. Are you creating a group that revolves around shared interests and is collaborative, or one that is more informational?

-- Don’t shy away from video. Regardless if this is live or recorded, video helps build trust with your community. Help your community put a face with your business name.

-- Be consistent. Though there is no magic answer to how much you should post, consistency drives results. Two to three times a week is a great jumping-off point.

-- Share other people’s content. Just like being a good dinner guest, asking questions, sharing interesting tidbits and not just talking about yourself (or, in this case, your business) yields to future dinner invitations. Not being solely focused on sales-type content in your online community will yield similar results.

-- Respond. Though you don’t have to respond to every comment that is made, remember someone in your community took time to share, so you should take time to respond.

-- If this is starting to look to you a lot like how you build community face-to-face, it should. Need help getting started? Contact your local Wyoming SBDC Network adviser for no-cost, confidential assistance at www.wyomingsbdc.org.

The Wyoming SBDC Network offers business expertise to help Wyoming residents think about, launch, grow, reinvent or exit their businesses. The Wyoming SBDC Network is hosted by UW with state funds from the Wyoming Business Council and funded, in part, through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration.

To ask a question, call 1-800-348-5194, email wsbdc@uwyo.edu, or write 1000 E. University Ave., Dept. 3922, Laramie, WY, 82071-3922.

Contact Us

Institutional Communications

Bureau of Mines Building, Room 137

Laramie

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: (307) 766-2929

Email: cbaldwin@uwyo.edu

Find us on Facebook (Link opens a new window) Find us on Twitter (Link opens a new window)

1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071
UW Operators (307) 766-1121 | Contact Us | Download Adobe Reader

Accreditation | Virtual Tour | Emergency Preparedness | Employment at UW | Privacy Policy | Harassment & Discrimination | Accessibility Accessibility information icon