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UW’s Saturday University Lecture Series Returns to Jackson Oct. 19

October 1, 2019
Roger Coupal, Susan Dewey and Kristen Landreville

Saturday University -- the University of Wyoming’s popular one-day lecture program -- returns to Jackson Saturday, Oct. 19, with three diverse topics including transforming the lives of incarcerated Wyoming residents, dealing with fake news, and how energy markets and technology change the demand for Wyoming energy.

Those topics will be discussed during the program beginning at 9 a.m. at the National Museum of Wildlife Art. Doors open at 8:30 a.m. for coffee and doughnuts, followed by three lectures by four UW personnel. A roundtable discussion with the day’s speakers will follow the presentations. A free lunch will be provided.

Participants may attend one, two or all three lectures.

During the fall and spring semesters, Saturday University visits locations throughout Wyoming discussing today’s most captivating topics, according to Saturday University organizers.

In its 12th year, Saturday University is a collaborative program that connects popular UW and Wyoming community college professors with lifelong learners. Offered 10 times this year -- twice each in Jackson, Gillette and Sheridan, and once in Cody, Green River, Pinedale and Rock Springs -- Saturday University is sponsored by the university, Wyoming community colleges and local communities.

The UW Office of Engagement and Outreach, National Museum of Wildlife Art, Central Wyoming College and InterConections 21 sponsor the Jackson program.

Listed below are program topic descriptions and professors lecturing:

-- 9 a.m.: “College in Prison: Transforming the Lives of Incarcerated Wyomingites,” Susan Dewey, a professor in UW’s Gender and Women’s Studies Program and associate director of the UW School of Culture, Gender and Social Justice.

With more people in prison today than at any other time in U.S. history, most are incarcerated for only a few years. Dewey asks, “How can their chances for success upon release be improved, for their benefit and for the benefit of the community?”

Dewey founded Wyoming Pathways from Prison to provide those incarcerated in Wyoming with the foundation of a college education. The program’s success -- both in reaching prisoners and involving faculty instructors -- makes this award-winning program a model for the nation.

-- 10 a.m.: “Fake News! Fake News! What is it? Why do we fall for it? What can we do about it?,” Kristen Landreville, UW Department of Communication and Journalism associate professor.

“In a polarized political environment, where many people have difficulty agreeing on basic facts, what effect does fake, false and misleading news have on our ability to carry out our democracy?” Landreville asks.

Her talk explores the psychological reasons that explain why some believe misinformation and then why people share it. Landreville will offer strategies for identifying and combating misinformation that will contribute to a healthier political dialogue.

-- 11 a.m.: “Energy Transitions and Legacies: The Changing Structure of Wyoming’s Energy Portfolio and its Policy Implications,” Roger Coupal, UW Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics professor.

As energy markets and technology change the demand for Wyoming energy, the economic development opportunities for Wyoming’s communities shift as well, sometimes for better and sometimes for worse, Coupal says.

“When the country transfers to other energy sources, it can affect local economic development and raise concerns about social and environmental problems -- to say nothing of incurring new costs as communities transition to the new future,” he adds. “These shifts can be anticipated, so energy-dependent communities and the state need to plan for the fundamental shifts that are coming.”

Coupal will discuss what is affecting the nation’s energy requirements and suggest ways Wyoming can best meet approaching changes.

For more information about Saturday University, visit the website at www.uwyo.edu/saturdayu/index.html.

Contact Us

Institutional Communications

Bureau of Mines Building, Room 137

Laramie

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: (307) 766-2929

Email: cbaldwin@uwyo.edu

Find us on Facebook (Link opens a new window) Find us on Twitter (Link opens a new window)

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