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About Wyoming Diabetes Prevention Programs


The National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) are a yearlong “support” lifestyle change program. These lifestyle change programs use a CDC-approved curriculum focused on eating healthier, increasing physical activity, and improving coping skills. Sessions are facilitated by a trained lifestyle coach. These programs use an evidence-based set of quality standards to measure success. DPPs are a partnership of public and private organizations [1].

 

Risk Factors

food on plate

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes is diabetes during pregnacy. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after your baby is born but increases your risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Your baby is more likely to have obesity as a child or teen, and is more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life too.
You might be at risk of developing gestational diabetes if you:
  • Had gestational diabetes during a previous pregnancy
  • Have given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Are overweight
  • Are more than 25 years old
  • Have a family history of type 2 diabetes
  • Have a hormone disorder called polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
  • Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander [2]
For more information on gestational diabetes click here.

What is Pre-Diabetes?

Pre-Diabetes is a common precursor to type 2 diabetes. It occurs when blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic conditon that affects the way the body processes sugar. 
  • 1 in 3 adults are at risk for Pre-Diabetes
  • 1 in 2 adults, age 65 and older are at risk for Pre-Diabetes [3].

 Pre-Diabetes Risk Factors

You might be at risk of developing pre-diabetes if you:
  • Are overweight
  • Are 45 years or older
  • Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes
  • Are physically active less than 3 times a week
  • Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, or Alaska Native (some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk) [3].
 

Simple lifestyle changes can have a big impact!

You can prevent or reverse prediabetes with simple, proven lifestyle changes like losing weight if you’re overweight, eating healthier, and getting regular physical activity.
older man planning tennis
 
A Diabetes Prevention Program can teach you how to make lifestyle changes to prevent or reverse prediabetes!  Find a program near you now.

 

 

A1C and You

Who Should Get an A1C Test, and When?

Testing for diabetes or prediabetes:
Get a baseline A1C test if you’re an adult over age 45—or if you’re under 45, are overweight, and have one or more risk factors for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes:
  • If your result is normal but you’re over 45, have risk factors, or have ever had gestational diabetes, repeat the A1C test every 3 years.
  • If your result shows you have prediabetes, talk to your doctor about taking steps now to improve your health and lower your risk for type 2 diabetes. Repeat the A1C test as often as your doctor recommends, usually every 1 to 2 years.
  • If you don’t have symptoms but your result shows you have prediabetes or diabetes, get a second test on a different day to confirm the result.
  • If your test shows you have diabetes, ask your doctor to refer you to diabetes self-management education and support services so you can have the best start in managing your diabetes [4].
Managing diabetes:
If you have diabetes, get an A1C test at least twice a year, more often if your medicine changes or if you have other health conditions. Talk to your doctor about how often is right for you [5].
multigenerational family with water bottles

doctor listening to heart of older woman

Take charge of your health! Talk to your doctor about diabetes prevention today.

When you visit your doctor, it can be helpful to have specific questions written down. You might consider asking a family member or trusted friend to go with you and take notes. Below are some questions you might consider asking your doctor [7]:

 

  • Am I at risk for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes? 
  • Do you recommend that I get tested for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes?
  • What are the warning signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes?
  • If I'm overweight, how much weight do I need to lose to lower my risk?
  • How much physical activity do I need to help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes?
  • What changes can I make to my diet to help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes?
  • What are some healthy ways to lose weight and keep it off?
  • Do my blood pressure numbers and cholesterol levels increase my risk for type 2 diabetes?
  • Can you give me some information about preventing type 2 diabetes to take home with me?
  • Can you refer me to a diabetes prevention program nearby? 

Are you at risk?

Facts about Prediabetes

  • 88 million people 18 years or older have prediabetes (34.5% of the adult US population)
  • 24.2 million people aged 65 years or older have prediabetes [1].

 

Prediabetes in Wyoming

  • 1 in 3 adults are prediabetic
  • 84% don't know they have prediabeties [8]
 
Find out more Diabetes Statistics by visiting the 2020 National Diabetes Statistics Report or get the Spanish version:  Informe Nacional de Estadísticas de la Diabetes 
 

 

Eligibility and Program Structure

Program Structure:

DPPs are specific to those with prediabetes or at high risk for type 2 diabetes. Classes focus on nutrition, physical activity, and stress management.
DPPs are year-long programs consisting of 16 sessions (1 hour/week) during the first phase and 6 follow up sessions (1 hour/month) during the second phase.
Participants will learn:
  • Healthy Eating
  • Adding/Increasing Physical Activity
  • Coping with Stress
  • Handling Challenges [6]


Participant Elligibility Requirements:

  • Be at least 18 years old, and
  • Be overweight (body mass index ≥25; ≥23 if Asian), and
  • Have no previous diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes, and
  • Have a blood test result in the prediabetes range within the past year:
  • Hemoglobin A1C: 5.7%–6.4%, or
  • Fasting plasma glucose: 100–125 mg/Dl, or
  • Two-hour plasma glucose (after a 75-gm glucose load): 140–199 mg/dL, or
  • Be previously diagnosed with gestational diabetes, or
  • Score 5 or higher on the CDC/ADA Prediabetes Risk Test [6]
man playing ball with a husky

Find a program near you!

dpp google map

 

If there isn't a program in your area, there is an online option! Visit PreventDiabetesWyoming.incentaHEALTH.com 

Self-Referral Form

Click here to access our self-referral form, red background

Contact Us Today!

Wyoming Center on Aging

Dept. 3415, 1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071

307-766-2829 | 307-766-2847 (fax)

healthierwyo@uwyo.edu

References

1. Lifestyle change program details. (2020, May 20). Retrieved March 04, 2021, from https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/lcp-details.html

2. Gestational diabetes. (2019, May 30). Retrieved March 04, 2021, from https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/gestational.html

3. About prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. (2019, April 04). Retrieved March 04, 2021, from https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/about-prediabetes.html

4. All about your a1c. (2018, August 21). Retrieved March 04, 2021, from https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/managing/managing-blood-sugar/a1c.html

5. Understanding a1c. (n.d.). Retrieved March 04, 2021, from https://www.diabetes.org/a1c

6. Lifestyle change program details. (2020, May 20). Retrieved March 04, 2021, from https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/lcp-details.html

7. Preventing type 2 diabetes: Questions for the doctor. (n.d.). Retrieved March 26, 2021, from https://health.gov/myhealthfinder/topics/doctor-visits/talking-doctor/preventing-type-2-diabetes-questions-doctor

 8. 2019 BRFSS Data

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