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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics

Roger H. Coupal, Department Head
206 Agriculture Building
Phone: (307) 766-2386, Fax: (307) 766-5544
Web site: http://www.uwyo.edu/ag/agecon

Professors
NICOLE S. BALLENGER, B.A. University of California, Santa Cruz 1975; M.S. University of California, Davis 1980; Ph.D. 1984; Professor of Agricultural Economics 2004.
ROGER COUPAL, B.S. Utah State University 1978; M.S. University of Arizona 1985; Ph.D. Washington State University 1997; Professor of Agricultural Economics 2015, 1997.
DON MCLEOD, B.S. St. John's College 1982; M.S. Oregon State University 1987; Ph.D. 1994; Professor of Agricultural Economics 2015, 1995.
L. STEVEN SMUTKO, B.S. Colorado State University 1978; M.C.R.P. North Dakota State University 1982; Ph.D. Auburn 1995; Spicer Chair of Collaborative Practice, Professor of Agriculture and Applied Economics 2009.
DAVID T. TAYLOR, B.S. Montana State University 1972; M.S. 1973; Ph.D. Colorado State University 1987; Professor of Agricultural Economics 1994, 1985.
GLEN D. WHIPPLE, B.A. Brigham Young University 1974; M.S. Utah State University 1976; Ph.D. Washington State University 1980; Professor of Agricultural Economics 1990, 1985; Director, UW Extension.

Associate Professors:
MATTHEW A. ANDERSEN, B.A. Colorado College 1991; M.S. Colorado School of Mines 2000; Ph.D. University of California, Davis 2005; Associate Professor of Agricultural and Applied Economics 2012, 2007.
CHRISTOPHER T. BASTIAN, B.S. University of Wyoming 1987; M.S. 1990; Ph.D. Colorado State University 2004; Associate Professor of Agricultural and Applied Economics 2013, 2005.
MARIAH D. EHMKE, B.S. Kansas State University 1997; M.S. Ohio State University 2001; Ph.D. Purdue University 2005; Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 2012.
DANNELE E. PECK, B.S. University of Wyoming 2000; M.S. 2002; Ph.D. Oregon State University 2006; Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 2012.
BENJAMIN S. RASHFORD, B.S. University of Wyoming 1999; M.S. 2001; Ph.D. Oregon State University 2006; Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics 2012.
JOHN RITTEN, B.S. Arizona State University 2001; M.B.A. New Mexico State University 2004; Ph.D. Colorado State University 2008; Associate Professor of Agriculture and Applied Economics 2015, 2008.

Assistant Professors:
KRISTIANA M. HANSEN, B.A. Reed College 1996; M.S. University of California, Davis 2003; Ph.D. 2008; Assistant Professor of Agriculture and Applied Economics 2012, 2009.
CHIAN A. RITTEN, Ph.D. Economics, Colorado State University 2011; Assistant Professor of Agriculture and Applied Economics 2013.

Academic Professionals:
COLE EHMKE, B.A. Bethany College 1997; M.S. University of Sydney, Australia 1999; Assistant University Extension Educator 2005.
BRIDGER M. FEUZ, Senior Extension Educator 2012.
THOMAS FOULKE, B.A. University of Montana 1985; M.S. University of Wyoming 1992; Associate Research Scientist 2005, 1998.
JOHN HEWLETT,
B.S. Montana State University 1985; M.S. Oregon State University 1987; Extension Educator 1987.

Temporary Lecturer:
JIM THOMPSON, B.A. Occidental College; M.A., Ph.D. University of Illinois-Chicago.

Professor Emeritus:
Edward Bradley, Larry J. Held, James J. Jacobs, Dale Menkhaus, Carl Olson, Alan C. Schroeder

Agriculture and Applied Economics

The Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics offers three options within the agricultural business bachelor of science degree program. They are agribusiness management, farm and ranch management, and international agriculture. All three options focus on the development of critical thinking, research, negotiation, and communication skills for students interested in

1. agricultural operations;
2. small rural businesses;
3. community economics;
4. financial institutions;
5. agricultural and natural resources development and;
6. other pursuits where applied economic tools will be useful.

A brief description of minimum course requirements for each of the three options in agricultural business is given below. In addition, faculty advisers will work with students to tailor a curriculum to individual interests and goals.

Agribusiness Management Option

This curriculum is for students preparing for careers in the agribusiness field. Applied agricultural economics courses are supplemented with marketing, management, finance and other courses from the College of Business and production-oriented courses from other departments in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources.

Minimum Course Requirements for Agricultural Business (B.S.) Majors within the Agribusiness Management Option1

Hours
FIrst-Year Seminar (FYS) 3
Writing: ENGL 1010 (COM1)2; Communication II (COM2)3, AGEC 4965 and AGEC 4970 (COM3) 9
Quantitative (Q)4 MATH 1400 and MATH 2350 - required for major 7
Science (PN)5 6
Human Culture (H) 6
U.S. & Wyoming Constitutions (V) 3
Agricultural Economics6: AGEC 1010, 1020, 3400, 4050 or MKT 3210 (counts for upper-division AGEC and business credit), 4060, 4500;
either 4450 or 4830 or 4840 or 4880; 3 hours of AGEC electives
21
Supporting agriculture (other than agricultural economics) 9
Statistics 4
Computers7 3
Supporting Economics ECON 3010 and 3020 6
Business (ACCT and 1020; and 9 hours of 3000-4000 level business courses) 15
Electives 25
Total Hours 120

1A minimum of 42 credits must be at the 3000 and 4000 level for graduation. At least 30 of the 42 credits must be earned from UW.

2Recommend or equivalent COM1 course.

3Majors in agribusiness management option must satisfy this requirement by earning 3 credits in a USP approved COM2 course.

4MATH 2350 is required as of fall 2008.

5Credits earned in USP approved science courses offered within the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources shall also serve as Supporting Agriculture credits.

624 credit hours in Ag Econ beyond those earned to satisfy University Studies requirements.

7COSC 1200 recommended.

Farm and Ranch Management Option

This curriculum is for students intending to become farm and/or ranch operators or professional managers of farms, ranches or feedlots. It is also well suited for students interested in the field of agricultural finance.

In this option, courses in farm and ranch management, finance, and marketing are supplemented by courses in crops, range management, veterinary sciences and animal science, with electives in other areas.

Minimum Course Requirements for Farm and Ranch Management (B.S.) Majors within the Farm and Ranch Management Option1 Hours
First-Year Seminar (FYS) 3
Writing: ENGL 1010 (COM1)2, Communication II (COM2)3, AGEC 4965 and AGEC 4970 (COM3) 9
Quantitative (Q)4 MATH 1400 and MATH 2350 - required for major 7
Science (PN)5: Biological Sciences 6
Physical Science CHEM 1000 or 1020 or 1050 4
U.S. & Wyoming Constitutions (V) 3
Agricultural Economics6 AGEC 1010, 1020, 2020, 3400, 4640, 12 hours of AGEC electives 28
Supporting Agriculture SOIL 2010 (8 AG college hours other than Agricultural Economics) 12
Statistics 4
Computers7 3
Supporting Economics ECON 3010 and 3020 6
Business ACCT 1010 3
Electives 32
Total Hours 120

1A minimum of 42 credits must be at the 3000 and 4000 level for graduation. At least 30 of the 42 credits must be earned from UW.

2Recommend or equivalent COM1 course.

3Major in the Farm and Ranch Management Option must satisfy this requirement by earning 3 credits in a USP approved COM2 course other than AGEC 3400.

4MATH 2350 is required as of fall 2008.

5Credits earned in USP approved science courses offered within the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources shall also serve as Supporting Agriculture credits.

624 credits in Ag Econ beyond those earned to satisfy University Studies requirements.

7COSC 1200 recommended.

International Agriculture Option

This curriculum is for students who desire training related to international agricultural business, and with agricultural and economic problems of developing nations. International trade and relations, world food production, agricultural and economic geography, economic development and comparative systems are emphasized in this program.  

Minimum Course Requirements for Farm and Ranch Management (B.S.) Majors within the Farm and Ranch Management Option1 Hours
First-Year Seminar (FYS) 3
Writing: ENGL 1010 (COM1)2, Communication II (COM2), AGEC 4965 and AGEC 4970 (COM3) 9
Quantitative (Q)3 MATH 1400 and MATH 2350 - required for major 7
Science (PN)4 6
Social Science: SOC 1000 or POLS 1200 6
U.S. & Wyoming Constitutions (V) 3
Agricultural Economics AGEC 1010, 1020, 2020, 4060 or 4450, 4600, 4880, and 6 hours of AGEC electives 24
Supporting Agriculture5 (other than Agricultural Economics) 6
Statistics 4
Computers6 3
Supporting Business BUSN/INST 2000, ECON 3010, 3020, and 4740 12

Supporting International7 POLS 2310 or 3220 or 3230 or 3270 or 4240 or 4250 or 4330 or 3220; GEOG 1020 or 1030 or 3030 or 3050 or 3550;
SOC/INST 4110 or 4300 or SOC 4600; AGEC 49308, BUSN 4540, MKT/INST 4540 and other pre-approved courses

15
Foreign Language9 1010, 1020, 2030 12
Electives 10
Total Hours 120

1A minimum of 42 credits must be at the 3000 and 4000 level for graduation. At least 30 of the 42 credits must be earned from UW.

2Recommended or equivalent COM1 course.

3MATH 2350 is required as of fall 2008.

4Credits earned in USP approved science courses offered within the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources shall also serve as Supporting Agriculture credits.

5Recommend AECL 1000, ANSC 1010, FDSC 1410, FCSC 1140, PLNT 2300, ENTO 1000 or 1001, REWM 2000 or 3020. Credits earned in USP approved science courses offered within the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources shall serve as Supporting Agriculture credits.

6COSC 1200 recommended.

7The student is required to take once course in POLS, GEOG, and SOC listed plus a minimum of two additional courses. Students may elect to satisfy this with the equivalent INST courses. A maximum of 3 credits of AGEC 4930 can be applied within the International Agriculture option.

8An approved international internship or experience is highly recommended for the AGRI Business majors within the International Agricultural option.

9If a student wishes to use their elective hours to contribute to a minor in foreign language (18 hours beyond the 12 hours required, 6 credits of International Social Sciences, Business and Economics requirement can be waived).

Livestock Management Option

This curriculum is for students intending to work in any sector of the livestock industry, ranging from input suppliers, to ranches, feedlots, meat packing companies, marketing and sales agents, futures/commodities exchange groups, policy makers, and international trade organizations. In this option, courses in farm and ranch management, agricultural finance, marketing, and trade are supplemented with courses in animal science, biology, range management, food science, data analysis, and other disciplines. Students may pursue a minor in Animal Science as part of this option, but can choose the non-minor version instead. Students will gain a broad understanding of both the business and science of the livestock industry.

Minimum Course Requirements for Agricultural Business (B.S.) Majors within the Livestock Business Management Option (without a minor) Hours
First-Year Seminar (FYS)1,2 3
Writing - Communication2,3: COM12,3, COM22,3,4 - AGEC 3020, COM32 - AGEC 4965 and AGEC 4970 9
Quantitative (Q) MATH 14002 and MATH 23503 - required for major 7
Science (PN)CHEM 1000; LIFE 1010 8
Human Culture (H)5 6
U.S. & Wyoming Constitutions (V) 3
Agricultural Economics AGEC 1010, 1020, 2020, 4640, 3400 or 4710, 4060, 4050 or MKT 2310, AGEC 4830 or 48408, 4880 or 4280 or ECON 4720, AGEC 4500 31
Additional Quantitative Skills STAT 2050 or 20703; COSC 1200 or IMGT 24009; AGEC 4230 or 4840 or STAT 3050 or IMGT 2400 or 3400 or MATH 2355 or ACCT 1010 or 1020 10
Biology of Livestock (for Animal Science minor10) LIFE 2022, ANSC 3010, ANSC 4120, ANSC 2010, ANSC 3100, LIFE 3050, ANSC 4540, ANSC 3150 or 4220 or 4230 or 4240,
PATB 4110, FDSC 204012, FDSC 3060
36
Biology of Livestock (for non-minor11) LIFE 2022, ANSC 1010, ANSC 4050, REWM 2000, REWM 3020, LIFE 3050, ANSC 4540, ANSC 2020, PATB 4110 or REWM 4000,
FDSC 2040, FDSC 3060
36
Supporting Business ECON 3020 3
Electives 4-5
Total Hours 120

A minimum of 42 credits must be at the 3000 and 4000 level for graduation. At least 30 of the 42 credits must be earned from UW.

1Transfer students who earn an A.A., A.S. or A.B. are waived from all USP requirements except COM3, V, and departmental requirements (MATH 1400 & 2350). FYS is waived for transfer students with 30 or more credits eared after high school, or 1 full year completed at another college (but less than 30 credits completed). COM3 automatically fulfills old I, L requirements.

2Must earn a “C” or better.

3Or equivalent course.

4A transfer student may fulfill COM2 with an intermediate composition course and a public speaking course.

5PN and H may not be fulfilled by AGEC courses or any course cross listed with AGEC.

6USP 2015 no longer requires a PEAC (Physical Activity) course.

712 hours of upper-division, not including AGEC 4965 or 4970.

8AGEC 4840 may not be double-counted towards both Agricultural Economics and Quantitative Skills.

9Suggest COSC 1200 for most, or AGRI 1010 (for inexperienced users), or IMGT 2400 (for advanced users).

10Must earn a “C” or better in all courses required in the minor to earn the minor.

11Courses identified for the non-minor option represent the most relevant livestock-related courses. However, if scheduling conflicts or other needs arise, advisors may petition for substitutions (except those in bold).

12FDSC 2040 is not actually required for the minor, but is recommened because of its relevance to all sectors of the livestock industry. Advisors may petition a substitution if it fits a student’s needs better.

Environment and Natural Resources

Students interested in natural resource or environmental issues or careers may complete any of the three options within agricultural business offered by the department with an environment and natural resource emphasis. Inquiries about environment and natural resource concentrations in agricultural business should be directed to the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.

Minors Program

The department also offers five minor programs. These five minors are to give students majoring in other undergraduate curricula in the university a concentration of work in any of the four specialized undergraduate curricula offered by the department or in general agricultural economics. Each minor requires 27 hours in prescribed course work including 6 hours in supporting agriculture. Students need to plan their course work to meet course prerequisites.

Agricultural Business Minor. AGEC 1010, 1020, 4050 and 4060; Accounting 1010; 6 additional hours in upper-level agricultural economics courses; 6 hours in supporting agriculture courses.

Farm and Ranch Management Minor. AGEC 1010, 1020, 2020 and 4640; 9 additional hours in upper-level agricultural economics courses; 6 hours in supporting agriculture courses.

International Agriculture Minor. AGEC 1010, 1020, 3860 and 4880; 6 additional hours in upper-level agricultural economics courses; 3 or 4 hours in foreign culture or language; 6 hours in supporting agriculture courses.

Natural Resource Economics Minor. Required: AGEC 1020, 4700, 4720, and 4750; choose 9 additional hours from AGEC 4450, 4600, 4710; ECON 2400, 4400, 4410, 4520 (note: College of Business prerequisites); ENR 4500.

General Agricultural Economics Minor. AGEC 1010, 1020 and 15 additional hours in agricultural economics courses with 12 hours at the upper-level; 6 hours in supporting agriculture courses.

Graduate Study

The Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics offers graduate work leading to the master of science degree. An agricultural business degree option is available, as well as the more traditional agricultural economics M.S. degree. Degree candidates may concentrate their work in one of the following areas: farm and ranch management, production economics, marketing and price analysis, agricultural policy, natural resource economics, agricultural finance, community development, or international agriculture. Degree candidates for the agricultural business degree may concentrate their work on management, marketing or finance. See the Graduate Bulletin for more details and information.

The Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics offers graduate work leading to the Master of Science degree. Students may choose among major options in the areas of agricultural and applied economics and agricultural business. The agricultural economics major emphasizes research with any of the following focus areas:

  • production economics and management,
  • marketing and market analysis,
  • resource and environmental economics,
  • international agriculture, and
  • economic and rural development

The agricultural business option offers advanced skills to students who desire professional careers in the business sector. Students in the agricultural business option may concentrate their coursework and writing in management, marketing, or finance. Dual majors in water resources, and environment and natural resources are also offered.

Finally, the Department offers a graduate minor in applied economics. This program is for currently enrolled graduate students in other disciplines seeking a foundation in economics as well as their major discipline.

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Undergraduate major in agricultural economics or economics is not required.

Students may be required to complete program prerequisite courses, without graduate credit, that were not completed in their undergraduate education.

Specifically, students who have not completed at least one course in calculus, statistics, intermediate microeconomic theory and intermediate macroeconomic theory will be required to complete these courses without graduate credit during their first semester in residence.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Agricultural Economics

The following courses constitute the M.S. in Agricultural Economics core requirements and are required of both Plan A and Plan B candidates (20 hours).

Economic Theory Hours
AGEC 5310 Theory of the Firm and Producer Behavior 3
AGEC 5630 Advanced Natural Resource Economics 3
AGEC 5710 Advanced Agricultural Market Theory 3
AGEC 5740 Theory of Consumer Behavior 3
Quantitative Methods
AGEC 5230 Intermediate Econometric Theory 3
AGEC 5320 Quantitative Methods in Agricultural Economics 3
Research
AGEC 5650 Research Methods 1
AGEC 5880 Advanced Seminar 1

Plan A (thesis):

Minimum of 30 credit hours including AGEC M.S. core requirements, thesis hours and electives.

No more than three hours of AGEC coursework numbered below 5000-level count toward the 30 hour requirement.

Achieve a cumulative 3.0 GPA in the AGEC M.S. core requirements.

The student's graduate committee, nominated by the major professor, the student, and the department head determine the final program of study and thesis research topic.

Presentation of research results at a formal public seminar.

Completion of an oral examination covering the student's thesis research administered by the graduate committee.

Plan B (non-thesis):

Minimum of 32 hours of coursework;

Non-thesis business analysis paper accepted by the student's graduate committee;

Minimum of 13 credit hours of agricultural economics coursework numbered at the 5000-level are required, including:

AGEC 5310

AGEC 5880

AGEC 5630 or 5710

AGEC 5320 or 5230

In addition, students are required to complete 3 credit hours from each of the following three areas:

Management:

AGEC 4060, 4640 or 5460; or MGT 4410, 4420, 4440, 4470, or 4520

Marketing:

AGEC 4050, 4830, 4840, 4880, or 5710, or MKT 4240, 4430, 4520, or 4540

Finance:

AGEC 4500; or FIN 4510, 4520, 4610, 4810; or ECON 4740

Remaining credit hours will be filled with electives.

The student's graduate committee, nominated by the major professor, the student and the department head determine the final program of study and business analysis topic.

Presentation of the business analysis paper at a formal public seminar.

An internship experience is strongly encouraged as part of the agricultural business option (AGEC 5990).

Master of Science in Agricultural Economics/Water Resources; Plan A (thesis):

Students must complete the 26 credit hour agricultural and applied economics including M.S. core requirements plus 4 thesis hours and 10 credit hours in water resources approved courses.

Please refer to Water Resources Degree program in this Bulletin for updated degree requirements.

Achieve a cumulative 3.0 GPA in the AGEC M.S. core requirements.

The student's graduate committee, nominated by the major professor, the student and the department head determine the final program of study and business analysis topic, which must be in the water resources area.

Presentation of research results at a formal public seminar.

Completion of an oral examination covering the student's thesis research administered by the graduate committee.

Master of Science in Agricultural Economics/Environment and Natural Resources (ENR); Plan A (thesis):

Students must complete the 26 credit hour agricultural and applied economics including M.S. core requirements plus 4 thesis hours and 15 credit hours in environment and natural resources, as approved by the student's committee and the ENR academic adviser;

Achieve a cumulative 3.0 GPA in the AGEC M.S. core requirements;

The student's graduate committee, nominated by the major professor, the student and the department head determine the final program of study and business analysis topic, which must be in the area of environment and natural resources;

Presentation of research results at a formal public seminar;

Completion of an oral examination covering the student's thesis research administered by the graduate committee.

Graduate Minor in Applied Economics:

Graduate standing;

AGEC 4640, AGEC 5310, or 5740, AGEC 5320 or 5230, and 6 additional credits of graduate AGEC courses;

Committee selection for the student's major thesis or dissertation committee should include at least one faculty member from AGEC.

Agricultural Economics (AGEC) Courses

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