Some of the content on this website requires JavaScript to be enabled in your web browser to function as intended. While the website is still usable without JavaScript, it should be enabled to enjoy the full interactive experience.

Skip to Main Navigation. Each navigation link will open a list of sub navigation links.

Skip to Main Content

University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Civil Engineering (CE)

1000 Level | 2000 Level | 3000 Level | 4000 Level | 5000 Level

USP Codes are listed in brackets by the 1991 USP code followed by the 2003 USP code (i.e. [M2<>QB]).

2050. Real Property Law. 3. Covers all major areas of real property law, including the nature of real property, types of ownership, real estate contracts, title and insurance, financing, landlord and tenant, land use, environmental law and regulation. An understanding of real property law is fundamental to understanding boundary law. Prerequisites: none.

2070. Engineering Surveying. 3. Principles of measurements of distances, elevation and angles. Basic error theory in measurement and calculations. Traverse field techniques and office calculations. Basic principles of surveying and map making. Prerequisite: significant surveying experience or ES 1060.

2072. Engineering Surveying Lecture. 2. Principles of measurements of distances, elevation and angles. Basic error theory in measurement and calculations. Basic principles of surveying and map making. Prerequisite: a working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry.

2073. Engineering Surveying Laboratory. 1. Field surveying activities consisting of traversing, differential leveling, construction staking and gathering topographic data. Prerequisite: CE 2072.

2074. Ethics for the Professional Surveyor. 1. Introduction to the common ethical and moral issues facing professional surveyors in modern practice. Prerequisite: CE 2070.

2076. Records Research for Surveyors. 3. Introduced to the public, quasi-public, and private depositories of recorded and non-recorded documents that establish land ownership boundaries, easement boundaries, and land use rights and restrictions in both the Public Land Survey System and the Colonial States. Assignments will require work to be conducted during depositories' normal business hours. Prerequisites: none.

2083. GIS for Surveyors. 3. Covers the basic concepts of geographic information systems, the methods and software used to implement them, and their applications to surveying and analysis of other surveying problems. Prerequisites: ES 1060 or 1061 and either CE 2070 or CE 2072.

2085. Public Land Surveys. 3. Basic fundamentals of the Public Land Survey System (PLSS), dependent and independent resurveys, survey plats, "bono fide rights", riparian boundaries, non-rectangular entities, corner evidence and the role of the modern day surveyor. Prerequisites: CE 2070 or equivalent.

2088. Writing Land Descriptions. 2. Historical and current issues for land description writing and usage for the practicing surveyor. Relationship between written descriptions and field survey data, interpreting old descriptions and the structure principles of description. Prerequisite: CE 2070.

2089. Basic Geodesy for Today's Land Surveyor. 2. The history of geodesy including measurement techniques, coordinate systems, ellipsoids, and datums is reviewed. The modern geodetic and Cartesian coordinates systems, as well as the differences between grid and ground coordinates systems, and the current geodetic and Cartesian coordinate systems available today are discussed. Prerequisites: none.

2090. GPS for Land Surveyors. 4. From fundamental theory to practical application and advanced technologies, this class covers all aspects of GPS needed to understand and use GPS as a land surveyor including the basics of GPS technology, common hardware, surveying methods, survey design, planning and observing, real-time kinematics and DGPS. Prerequisites: CE 2089.

2100. Civil Engineering Systems. 3. The practice of civil engineering is used as a model to introduce how the different areas of civil engineering are interested. Uses examples from several civil engineering projects to introduce computer-aided drafting and design. Prerequisites: ES 2110 and CE 2070.

3100. Civil and Architectural Engineering Practice. 3. Civil and architectural engineering practice from project inception through construction documentation. Topics include: codes, marketing, specifications, budgeting, contracts, subcontracting, registration, construction planning, scheduling, bidding, liability, insurance, and bonding. A review of professional ethics including the engineer in society, business and profession with case studies of professional responsibility and ethics decisions. Cross listed with ARE 3100. Prerequisites: CE 2100 or ARE 2100.

3200. Structural Analysis I. 3. Introductory design and analysis topics in loads on building, stress and displacement analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and frames, classical flexibility and stiffness methods. Cross listed with ARE 3200. Prerequisite: ES 2410.

3210 [2210]. Civil Engineering Materials. 3. [(none)<>WB] Laboratory investigation and design of materials used in civil engineering: metals, masonry, concrete and timber. Non-destructive evaluation of materials. Analysis and presentation of data, including various types of written reports and oral presentations. Cross listed with ARE 3210. Prerequisites: WA and ES 2410.

3300 [4320]. Hydraulic Engineering. 3. Develops analysis, design and modeling techniques for incompressible pipe flow, steady uniform and gradually varied open channel flow, and hydraulic structures. Prerequisite: ES 2330.

3400. Introduction to Environmental Engineering. 3. An introduction to the major topics in environmental engineering. Focus areas include water supply, wastewater treatment, air pollution control and solid and hazardous waste management. Quantitative aspects and engineering solutions to problems are emphasized. Prerequisites: MATH 2205 and CHEM 1020 or equivalent.

3500 [4500]. Transportation Engineering. 3. Introduction to the major topics in Transportation Engineering. Focus areas include roadway and non-motorized facility design, traffic operations, transportation planning, and pavement materials and design. Prerequisite: CE 2070.

3600 [4600]. Soil Mechanics I. 3. A study of soil and the properties which influence its usefulness as an engineering material. Principles governing movement of soil, water and propagation of stresses through soil masses are studied. Prerequisite: ES 2410.

3710 [4710]. Route Surveying. 3. Principles of route location and design. The theory of circular, parabolic and spiral curves; highway and railway geometric design; area and volumes of earthwork; and mass diagrams. Prerequisite: CE 2070 or equivalent.

3720 [4720]. Advanced Surveying. 4. Advanced topics in surveying computations and procedures, including traverse error analysis, topographic surveying, mapping, astronomical observations, coordinate geometry applications, introduction to geodesy, state plane coordinates and concepts of least squares analysis of survey adjustments. Prerequisite: CE 2070 or equivalent.

3740. Survey Boundary Control and Legal Principles. 2. Addresses the fundamental principles of real property as applied to land surveying and related professions. Discussion and applications center on practical situations and concepts commonly encountered while conducting boundary surveys and the determination of the extent of ownership rights. Students explore the scope of the surveyors' judiciary role in real property ownership. Primarily offered through the Outreach School. Prerequisite: CE 2070 or equivalent.

3750. Surveying Evidence and Procedures for Boundary Location. 2. A practical and working guide to understanding survey evidence and the laws of boundary location for efficient, accurate boundary determination. This material aids in the elimination of errors in location of land boundaries. The surveyor's liability and statutes of limitations are explored in depth. Also included are discussions of the surveyor's role in court. Normally offered only through the Outreach School. Prerequisite: CE 2070 or equivalent.

3760. Applied Least Squares Adjustments. 4. The use of applied statistics in land surveying, error propagation in polygon and link traverses, discussion of positional tolerances and an introduction to least squares adjustments using StarNet and VectorNT software. Prerequisite: CE 3720.

3900 [4900]. Engineering Economics and Decision Making. 3. A study of decision making with an emphasis on economic criteria. Includes time value of money, present value, annual value and rate of return methods; incremental graphics, depreciation methods, income tax evaluations; replacement and sensitivity analysis; and governmental financing. Evaluation of risk and uncertainty in decision making also covered. Prerequisite: junior standing.

4100. Civil Engineering Applications in GIS. 3. Concepts of Geographic Information Systems, the methods and software used to implement them, and their applications to solve civil engineering problems. Prerequisites: CE 2070 and senior standing.

4200. Structural Analysis II. 3. Stress and displacement of indeterminate structures. Determination of loads on buildings. Matrix stiffness methods. Cross listed with ARE 4200 Prerequisite: ARE/CE 3200.

4250. Structural Steel Design. 3. Design of structural components and applications utilizing steel. Cross listed with ARE 4250. Prerequisite: ARE/CE 4200 or concurrent enrollment.

4260. Structural Concrete Design. 3. Design of structural components and applications utilizing reinforced concrete. Cross listed with ARE 4260. Prerequisite: ARE/CE 3200.

4280. Reinforced Masonry Design. 3. Design of structural components in reinforced masonry buildings, including walls, columns, beams and connections. Particular attention is paid to current codes, specifications and analysis. Cross listed with ARE 4280. Prerequisites: ARE/CE 4260 and concurrent enrollment in ARE/CE 4200.

4295. Structural Timber Design. 3. Design of structural components and applications utilizing timber. Cross listed with ARE 4295. Dual listed with CE 5295. Prerequisite: ARE 3200 or CE 3200 or equivalent.

4350 [4810]. Design of Hydraulic Engineering Systems. 3. For seniors and graduate students in civil engineering who desire to learn design of municipal water distribution and wastewater collection (storm and sanitary) systems by combining principles from hydraulics, hydrology and environmental engineering course work into an integrated design approach. Prerequisite: CE 3300.

4400. Design of Water Treatment Facilities. 3. A theoretical and practical design course for municipal potable water treatment systems. Major emphasis includes health criteria, operational control procedures, primary and secondary drinking water regulations, as well as the latest treatment design standards for production of drinking water. Prerequisite: CE 3400.

4410. Design of Wastewater Treatment Facilities. 3. A theoretical and practical design course for treatment of municipal wastewaters. Major areas of emphasis include waste characterization and physical, chemical and biological unit processes. Prerequisite: CE 3400.

4430 [3420, 2420]. Environmental Engineering Chemistry. 3. Focus includes inorganic, organic, physical, equilibrium, biochemistry, colloidal, and nuclear chemistry with an emphasis on the problems/solutions encountered by environmental and civil engineers. Prerequisite: CE 3400.

4440. Solid Waste Engineering. 3. Municipal solid waste characteristics and quantities, collection, landfills, processing of municipal solid waste, materials separation, combustion and energy recovery, and biochemical processes with an emphasis on materials flow. Integrated solid waste management principles are also discussed. Prerequisite: CE 3400.

4510 [5510]. Pavement Design for Airports and Highways. 3. Designing flexible and rigid pavements for highways and airports. Topics include pavement materials and common uses, soil stabilization, quality control of materials, pavement design procedures. Dual listed with CE 5510. Prerequisite: CE 3500 or 3600.

4530. Traffic Engineering: Operations. 3. Basic characteristics of traffic, such as drivers, vehicles, volumes, speeds, delay, origins and destinations, intersection performance, capacity, termination and accidents; techniques for making traffic engineering investigations; traffic laws and ordinances, regulations, design and application of signal systems; curb parking control; enforcement and traffic administration; and public relations. Dual listed with CE 5530. Prerequisite: CE 3500.

4555 [4520]. Geometric Design of Highways. 3. Criteria controlling geometric design of highways including design speed, design volume, vehicle requirements and capacity design standards for different highway types; design of sight distance, alignment, grade; cross-section design; access control, frontage roads; intersection design elements, and design of intersections and interchanges. Students may not receive credit for both CE 4555 and CE 5555. Dual listed with CE 5555. Prerequisite: CE 3500.

4610 [5610]. Foundation Engineering. 3. Site characterization and soil properties. Includes bearing capacity, stress distribution, settlement. Design of shallow and deep foundations. Prerequisite: CE 3600.

4620. Soil and Rock Slope Engineering. 3. Covers the topic of engineered slopes for civil infrastructure. Topics include engineering and geologic classification of landslides; field investigations; soil and rock strength properties for stability analysis; analytical and numerical methods for analysis of slope stability; design of engineered stabilization systems. Prerequisites: CE 3600.

4630. Geotechnical Engineering. 3. Covers topics in design and analysis of soil site investigation and construction, such as instrumentation, soil improvement, water control and remedial measures. Prerequisite: CE 3600.

4700. Coastal Water Boundaries. 3. The physical and legal issues involved with property rights of lands abutting tidal waters, a review of the Public Land Survey System, the Submerged Lands Act and the Swamp and Overflowed Lands Act. Includes case law research. Prerequisites: CE 3740, CE 3750.

4730. Inland Water Boundaries. 3. Introduces the physical and legal issues involved in locating property rights associated with lands that abut non-tidal, navigable and non-navigable rivers and lakes. The property rights which attach to, as well as the limitations placed on these riparian parcels will be examined and discussed with respect to statutory, administrative and case law. Prerequisite: CE 4700.

4740 [2086]. Advanced Public Land Surveys. 4. Advanced topics in situations and problems in the Public Land Survey system, with discussion of major court cases involving everyday applications to surveyors. 1975 BLM casebook and other sources of survey reference. Prerequisite: CE 2085 and 3740.

4750. Remote Sensing/Photogametry for Surveyors. 3. Procedures and methods used for deriving metric information from photographs, analog processes for using aerial photographs in production of topographic maps, flight planning, and cost estimation in aerial mapping work. Introduction to photocoordinate measurement devices and their calibration. Mathematics of modern photogrammetry. Prerequisite: CE 3760.

4800. Hydrology. 3. Analysis of elements of the hydrologic cycle and design with emphasis on precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration, runoff and groundwater. Precipitation/Runoff relationships, routing methods, flood prediction, groundwater yield and drawdown in unconfined and confined aquifers, unsteady well behavior, and method of images are also introduced. Prerequisite: CE 3300.

4820 [AGRE 4200]. Groundwater and Drainage Engineering. 3. Principles and basic equations associated with saturated and unsaturated flow in soils describing groundwater and drainage flow will be developed. Design and analysis of surface and subsurface drainage systems will occur for steady and transient flow. Prerequisite: ES 2330.

4900. Comprehensive Design Experience in:______. 1-4 (Max. 4). Concentrated, comprehensive design course focusing on one or more subdisciplines within civil engineering. See your departmental adviser for further information and requirements. Prerequisites: senior standing in civil engineering; concurrent enrollment in the designated companion course.

4920. Senior Civil Engineering Problems. 1‑3 (Max. 6). A study of current engineering problems that are applicable to civil engineering either on an individual basis or for small seminar type groups. Prerequisite: senior standing or approval of department head.

4959. Enrichment Studies. 1-4 (Max. 99). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics.  Note: credit in this course may NOT be included in an undergraduate or graduate program of study for a degree or for credit towards a certificate program. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

4970. Wyoming D.O.T. Design Squad Cooperative Experience. 3. Experience with Wyoming Department of Transportation design procedures and fundamentals. Participation in development of design documents used to construct actual projects. Offered S/U Only. Prerequisites: selection for Laramie Design Squad employment and consent of department head.

4975. Civil and Architectural Engineering Internship. 1-3 (Max. 3). Students may apply for credit for extended work experience (>10 weeks; full-time) at a professional engineering or architectural firm, supervised by a licensed professional. Students should apply through their adviser prior to the work experience. Enrollment is by departmental approval only. Offered summer only. Prerequisite: junior standing.

5000. Solid Mechanics I. 3. The first in a sequence of two introductory courses in solids mechanics. It includes elements of continuum mechanics, in addition to the introduction of elasticity theory (limited to plane problems), as well as elements of viscoelasticity and plasticity. Cross listed with ME  5000. Prerequisites: CE 3200 or ME 3010 and MATH 2310.

5010. Advanced Mechanics of Materials. 3. Elements of elasticity, unified approach to strength of structural members design and failure criteria; basic concepts of fracture mechanics; stress concentration factors; treatment of torsion, bending, axial and shear in structural members including plastic effects; bending of flat plates. Prerequisite: ME 3010 or CE 3200, MATH 2310.

5040 [5020]. Introduction to Finite Element Analysis. 3. An introduction to the theory and application of finite elements to the solution of various problems with emphasis on structural mechanics. Includes development of the underlying matrix equations, the treatment of element generation and properties, and implementation of boundary conditions. Cross listed with ME 5040. Prerequisite: MATH 2310 and (CE 4200 or ARE 4200 or ME 3010).

5045. Advanced Finite Element Analysis. 3. Advanced topics in finite element analysis with emphasis on mathematical foundations of the method, numerical algorithms for software implementation, and analysis of problems with material and geometric nonlinear behavior. Cross listed with ME 5045. Prerequisite: ME 4040 or ME 5040 or CE 5040.

5140. Computational Methods in Applied Sciences I. 3. First semester of a three-semester computational methods series. Review of iterative solutions of linear and nonlinear systems of equations, polynomial interpolation/approximation, numerical integration and differentiation, and basic ideas of Monte Carlo methods. Comparison of numerical techniques for programming time and space requirements, as well as convergence and stability. Identical to ME 5140, PETE 5140, CHE 5140, COSC 5310 and Math 5310. Prerequisite: Math 3310, COSC 1010.

5200. Advanced Structural Analysis. 3. Analysis of framed structures with stiffness-based matrix methods including plane trusses, frames, and grid systems and space trusses and frames. Column, beam, beam-column and frame stability. Geometric and material nonlinearities of framed structures. Plastic analysis and moment-curvature relationships. Computer applications are emphasized. Prerequisite: CE 4200 or equivalent.

5220. Structural Dynamics. 3. Introduction to general structural dynamics, general dynamic loading, generalized coordinated and nonlinear structural response, linear and nonlinear response spectra, multiple degree of freedom systems, continuous systems, and discretization of continuous systems. Introduction to seismic load specifications. Prerequisite: CE 4200 or equivalent and MATH 2310.

5230. Advanced Materials. 3. The objective of this course is to introduce the graduate student to the behavior of various materials found in typical structural engineering applications and to the mechanics of obtaining materials properties and structural response. Prerequisite: CE 4260.

5240. Structural Systems Design. 1-5 (Max. 6). A comprehensive design course for steel and reinforced concrete building structures. Topics include preliminary design, selection of framing systems, braced and unbraced frames, stability effects and nonlinear behavior. Students use case studies to develop design alternatives. Prerequisite: CE 4200, 4250, 4260.

5255. Advanced Steel Design 3. A comprehensive design course for steel building structures. Topics include preliminary design, selection of framing systems, braced and unbraced frames, stability effects and nonlinear behavior. Includes building design project for seismic regions. Prerequisites: grade of C or better in CE or ARE 4250.

5260. Prestressed Concrete Design. 3. This is a classical course on prestressed and precast concrete. The subject focuses on the principles, behavior and performance of prestressed and precast concrete. Topics include flexure, shear, and axial load, construction and fabrication issues, and applications. The course complements CE 4260. Prerequisite: CE 4260.

5270. Highway Bridge Engineering. 3. A study of the analysis, design and rating of highway bridges, including consideration of dead and vehicular loads, analysis of typical systems, service, fatigue and ultimate strength behavior, rating of existing bridge design, and bridge operations. Composite and non-composite steel and concrete bridges are considered. Includes investigations that require field trips outside the schedule class times. Contemporary issues are routinely discussed. Prerequisites: CE 4250 and 4260.

5280. Behavior of Reinforced Concrete. 3. Broad-based coverage of the behavior of concrete, both at the member and structure level. The course will have no assigned text, although students will be expected to have an undergraduate concrete design textbook and a current ACI Code. Readings will include a number of technical papers in each area covered. Emphasis will be on the background of the code, code development, and investigative techniques. Prerequisite: CE 4200 and 4260.

5290. Earthquake Engineering. 3. Second course in a series to design earthquake resistant structures. Topics include interpreting code requirements, calculating design forces on structures, evaluating inelastic behavior of structures, understanding how materials behave and advances in earthquake engineering. Prerequisite: CE 5220.

5295. Structural Timber Design. 3. Design of structural components and applications utilizing timber. Cross listed with ARE 5295. Dual listed with CE 4295. Prerequisite: ARE 3200 or CE 3200 or equivalent.

5300. Open-Channel Hydraulics. 3. Analysis and design of steady, uniform, gradually varied and spatially varied flow in open channels. Emphasis on basic fluid flow equations associated with natural and man-made open channels. Prerequisite: CE 3300.

5310. Hydraulics of Closed Conduits. 3. Pipe transmission and distribution systems design including flow control, flow measurement, energy dissipation, pump selection, transients, and cavitation. Prerequisite: CE 3300.

5330. Design of Hydraulic Structures. 3. Basic hydraulic principles and design of man-made channels. Analysis and design of control and regulating devices and measurement devices used in water resources systems. Prerequisite: CE 3300.

5400. Water Treatment. 3. Advanced theory and practice of collection, purification, and distribution of potable water; special emphasis on purification techniques, and plant requirements and design. Prerequisite: CE 4400.

5410. Advanced Biological Wastewater Treatment. 3. Theory and practice of advanced biological treatment processes for municipal and industrial wastewaters, sludges, groundwater bioremediation and solid waste. Emphasis is on fundamental principles applied to the design and control of existing processes and the development of innovative systems. Cross listed with CHE/ENVE 5410. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

5425. Environmental Engineering Microbiology. 3. Development of microbiology for environmental engineering applications. Introduction to bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses with particular focus on pathogenicity and practical metabolic capabilities for waste treatment and remediation. Also examines the basis and pathways of important biochemical reactions including nitrification, hydrogen fermentation, dehalogenation and methanogenesis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5435. Environmental Transport Processes. 3. Designed for graduate students and engineering seniors interested in the principles of mass transport and their application to environmental systems. Deals with the hydrodynamics of mixing and transport, as well as the interaction of mixing and various reaction rate processes. Applications include water and wastewater treatment, groundwater pollution, and transport and mixing in rivers, lakes and reservoirs. Prerequisite: MATH 2310 and ES 2330.

5445. Hazardous Waste Site Remediation. 3. The contamination of soil, air, and groundwater by improper disposal of hazardous wastes is covered. Control and cleanup of contaminated groundwater plumes, treatment of polluted soils and soil gases is emphasized. Case studies are extensively used. Prerequisite: CE 3400 and consent of instructor.

5450. Advanced Physical-Chemical Treatment. 3. A study of physical and chemical processes for treatment of water and waste water. Cross listed with ENVE 5450. Prerequisite: CE 4400.

5455. Project Management for Environmental Engineering. 3. Covers the fundamentals of project management as applied to the environmental remediation field. Emphasis will be placed on project organization, work breakdown structures, life cycle management project implementation and control, and the integration of individual projects into the overall project management framework. Prerequisite: CE 3400.

5460. Industrial Waste Treatment. 3. A critical study of the sources and treatment of various industrial wastewaters is covered, including the regulatory framework establishing treatment goals. Case studies of various industries are used to illustrate methods of volume and strength reduction. Design of unit operations and processes peculiar to industrial waste treatment is emphasized. Prerequisite: CE 5410.

5510. Pavement Design for Airports and Highways. 3. Designing flexible and rigid pavements for highways and airports. Topics include pavement materials and common uses, soil stabilization, quality control of materials and pavement design procedures. Dual listed with CE 4510. Prerequisite: CE 3500 or 3600.

5530 [5520]. Traffic Engineering: Operations. 3. Basic characteristics of traffic, such as drivers, vehicles, volumes, speeds, delay, origins and destinations, intersection performance, capacity, termination and accidents; techniques for making traffic engineering investigations; traffic laws and ordinances, regulations, design and application of signal systems; curb parking control; enforcement and traffic administration; and public relations. Dual listed with CE 4530. Prerequisite: CE 3500.

5535. Engineering Decision Making. 3. A study of engineering decision-making techniques based on monetary and non-monetary criteria. Includes benefit-cost analysis, sufficiency ratings and sensitivity and risk analysis; mathematical programming and optimization models; multi-attribute and multi-objective decision-making methods; and management systems. Prerequisite: CE 3900.

5540. Traffic Control. 3. Planning, designing, and operating transportation facilities to optimum efficiency using traffic control devices. Topics included are traffic flow theory; pavement markings, signing, and signal design; computer design of signal systems using linear and network models; traffic control in construction areas. Prerequisite: CE 3500 and ES 2110.

5545. Transport Network Analysis. 3. Traffic assignment and network modeling techniques; deterministic and stochastic user equilibrium assignment; mathematical programming formulations and solution algorithms; extensions to basic models; and applications to roadway pricing and other planning scenarios. Prerequisite: graduate standing in civil engineering.

5555. Geometric Design of Highways. 3. Criteria controlling geometric design of highways including design speed, design volume, vehicle requirements and capacity design standards for different highway types; design of sight distance, alignment, grade; cross-section design; access control, frontage roads; intersection design elements; and design of intersections and interchanges. CE 5555 students are required to do an additional integrated design term project using design software. Students may not receive credit for both CE 4555 and CE 5555. Dual listed with CE 4555. Prerequisites: CE 3500.

5560. Traffic Safety. 3. Safety design and operational practices for streets and highways including safety improvement programs, design of barrier systems, bicycle and pedestrian consideration; access control; safety evaluation; and measures of effectiveness. Prerequisite: CE 3500 and STAT 4220.

5570. Transportation Planning. 3. Short and long-range transportation planning; land-use planning, travel behavior and transportation studies including demand forecasting; parking and transit studies; highway and street planning; and freight transportation and multi-model planning. Prerequisite: CE 3500.

5575. Intelligent Transportation Systems. 3. The use of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) to improve the safety, efficiency, reliability, and/or security of transportation systems. Covers ITS applications, technologies, deployment issues, and system performance in both urban and rural environments. Prerequisites: CE 3500.

5585. Pavement Management Systems. 3. A study of the systems that a transportation agency may utilize to manage the pavement in their road network. History and purpose of pavement management are studied as well as hot to make objective pavement management decisions. The distinction between project-level and network-level management concerns is explored and the implementation of a pavement management system is studied. Finally, methods for utilizing the information from the management system is studied. Prerequisite: CE 3500.

5590. Pavement Materials. 3. Selecting materials for highway construction, testing aggregates and bituminous materials, designing and testing asphalt mixtures; and recommending maintenance and rehabilitation strategies for deteriorated pavements. Prerequisite: CE 3500.

5620. Earth Retaining Structures and Slope Stability. 3. Earth pressure theories. Design of rigid and flexible earth retaining walls and braced excavations. Analysis, design, and control of natural and man-made slopes. Prerequisite: CE 3600.

5700. Civil Engineering Problems I. 1-3 (Max. 6). A special course, designed to make possible the study and investigation of problems or phases of civil engineering selected to fit the needs of the students. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5710. Civil Engineering Seminar I. 1-3 (Max. 6). A seminar type class furnishing motivation for advanced study of current problems in broad field of civil engineering by means of library research, study of current literature, and carefully guided class discussion. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5720. Civil Engineering Problems II. 1-3 (Max. 6). A special course designed to make possible the study and investigation of problems or phases of civil engineering selected to fit the needs of the student. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5730. Civil Engineering Seminar II. 1-3 (Max. 6). A seminar-type class furnishing motivation for advanced study of current problems in the broad field of engineering by means of library research, study of current literature, and carefully guided class discussions. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

5785. H.T. Person Seminar. 3. Special topics in engineering as presented by the H.T. Person distinguished professor. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

5810. Groundwater Hydrology. 3. Laws governing the movement, recharge, and production of underground water with special emphasis on techniques and methods for analysis and modeling for development of groundwater resources. Prerequisite: CE 4800.

5820. Design of Small Earth Dams. 3. Develop understanding, analysis, design and construction techniques for all components considered in small earth dam design. integration of hydrology, hydraulics and soil mechanics into a sound dam design. Dam design will be emphasized  from foundation through embankment. Prerequisite: CE 3300, 3600 and 4800 or concurrent enrollment.

5830. Flow in Porous Media. 3. Examines fluid (liquid, gas, vapor) and heat flow in porous media and its effects specifically in soil. Near surface effects (impibation, infiltration and evaporation) is emphasized. Analytic and numerical solution techniques will be developed. Prerequisite: CE 5810 or consent of instructor.

5860. Soil Erosion and Conservation. 3. Physical principles of soil erosion by wind and water, computer simulations of erosion, selection and design of erosion control practices and structures. Prerequisite: CE 4300, CE 4800.

5865. Deterministic Hydrology. 3. Philosophy of modeling, hydrologic model formulation and design; lumped, semi-distributed, and physics-based hydrologic models for watershed- and landscape-scale predictions; process-level mathematical and numerical descriptions and coupling;  model calibration, testing, and validation; parameterization, numerical approximations of flow equations; scale effects, modeling ethics. Prerequisite: CE 4800.

5870. Water Resources Engineering. 3. Study in water resource planning and design and problem solving applying engineering principles and procedures. Western United States water problems are emphasized, including user completion, reallocation, consumptive use, water development, conservation, conveyance losses, and return flows. Prerequisite: CE 3300.

5875. Probalistic Hydrology. 3. Introduction to the language, methods and tools in systems analysis in stochastic hydrologic modeling; parameter estimation; sensitivity analysis; optimization schemes; uncertainty analysis; probabilistic forecasting; state-space modeling with Kalman filtering, and data assimilation. Prerequisite: CE 4800.

5880. Advanced Hydrology. 3. Advanced hydrologic analysis of floods, sediment, water utilization, flow routing, and the application of special hydrologic problems. Prerequisite: CE 3300 and CE 4800.

5885. Hydrometeorology. 3. Global radiation budget, global hydrologic cycle, precipitation formation, occurrence and remote sensing, snow melt, evapotranspiration, interception, infiltration and runoff generation mechanisms, overland flow, land surface modeling, stream routing. Prerequisite: CE 3300.

5900. Practicum in College Teaching. 1-3 (Max. 3). Work in classroom with a major professor. Expected to give some lectures and gain classroom experience. Prerequisite: graduate status.

5920. Continuing Registration: On Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5940. Continuing Registration: Off Campus. 1-2 (Max. 16). Prerequisite: advanced degree candidacy.

5959. Enrichment Studies. 1-3 (Max. 99). Designed to provide an enrichment experience in a variety of topics. Note: credit in this course may not be included in a graduate program of study for degree purposes.

5960. Thesis Research. 1-12 (Max. 24). Graduate level course designed for students who are involved in research for their thesis project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their thesis. Prerequisites: Enrolled in a graduate degree program.

5980. Dissertation Research. 1-12 (Max. 48). Designed for students who are involved in research for their dissertation project. Also used for students whose coursework is complete and are writing their dissertation. Prerequisite: enrolled in a graduate level degree program.

5990. Internship. 1-12 (Max. 24). Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Share This Page:

Footer Navigation

University of Wyoming Medallion
 
1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071 // UW Operators (307) 766-1121 // Contact Us // Download Adobe Reader