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Graduate Students|UW Anthropology

UW Anthropology Graduate Students

 


Kristi Borzea

Kristi Borzea - Masters Student (Archaeology)

kborzea@uwyo.edu

Research Interests: Includes Paleoindian archaeology, faunal analysis, site formation processes and historic (specifically mining related) archaeology. I have excavation and survey experience in North Dakota, Kansas, Wyoming, Colorado and Montana.

 

 

Josh Boyd

Joshua Boyd - Masters Student (Archaeology)

jboyd9@uwyo.edu

My main interest in archaeology is having fun! Beyond that I like Rocky Mountain hunter and gatherers and particularly Paleoindian high altitude behavioral adaptations. In order to understand this I study lithic procurement, reduction and discard strategies as well as the organization of technology. I am also interested in high altitude communal hunting strategies. I love field work and am interested in the ways that excavation methods help inform natural and cultural site formation processes. I have worked on academic projects in the Gunnison Basin of Colorado, with the BLM and also a private consulting firm.
Les Brown

Leslie Brown - Doctoral Student (Bioarchaeology)

lbrown31@uwyo.edu

Research Interests:
My main research interest is the stable isotope analysis of human and faunal remains to determine potential geographic mobility and possible diet. Through combining the data produced through these stable isotope studies with information from osteological and archaeological analyses, I hope to develop a more thorough understanding of the lives of the individuals in the populations being studied.  Recently I have been working with Late Horizon and Early Contact period populations from the central coast of Peru as well as populations from a 19th-century Oregon Trail outpost site in Wyoming. In addition to this research, I have also worked as a bioarchaeologist in central Mexico and participated in CRM work in both Georgia and Wyoming.
Sean Carrol

Sean Carroll - Masters Student (Archaeology)

scarro10@uwyo.edu

Research Interests: Interests include lithics, lithic analysis, and tool stone sourcing. I am also interested in hunter-gatherer mobility and prehistoric settlement adaptation strategies and associated technology.

 

 

Ragan Driver

                      

Ragan Driver - Masters Student (Biological Anthropology)

ragurn@uwyo.edu

Research Interests: Modern Human Origins, skeletal morphology, energetics of bipedal locomotion (especially running), biocultural relationships, zooarchaeology, Northwestern Plains archaeology.

 

 

                                         
Rod Garnett

 

 

Rod Garnett- Doctoral Student

rgarnett@uwyo.edu, website

Research interests: Rod Garnett teaches classes in world music and flute at the University of Wyoming. He currently performs extensively at the University, regionally with classical guitarist Alex Komodore, nationally with the Irish Folk Ensemble Colcannon, and at the Boxwood Festival in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia. In addition to teaching at the University of Wyoming he is coordinator and assistant instructor for the Wyoming Gamelan Chandra Wyoga and Sikuris de Wyoming, and is a teacher and assistant for the Boxwood Festival.Garnett studied flute with Karen Yonovitz, Larry Jordan, Geoffrey Gilbert, and Thomas Nyfenger. He has worked extensively as a free-lance musician in orchestras, jazz and chamber music ensembles, and recording studios.In addition to his duties in the Department of Music Garnett is currently pursuing a PhD in the UW Department of Anthropology. The past several years he has worked in Indonesia, Romania, Bulgaria, Ukraine, Slovakia, Moldova, and the Czech Republic, studying and documenting traditional flutes and music.Rod Garnett is a recipient of the Wyoming Governor's Arts Award. He was the 2007 University of Wyoming Presidential Speaker and in 2008 was honored with the University of Wyoming Internationalization Award.

Justin Garrison

Justin Garrison - Masters Student (Cultural Anthropology)

jgarris6@uwyo.edu

Research interests: I am interested in cultural tourism in Japan, post-migration ethnicity, and cultural theory.

 

 

grunwald

Allison Grunwald -Doctoral Student(Archaeology)

agrunwa1@uwyo.edu

Research interests: prehistoric archaeology, paleopathology, zooarchaeology, human-animal relations, and ritual zooarchaeology. Other interests include Indo-European studies, British archaeology, developmental osteology and symbolism. So far I've done field work and lab analysis in New Jersey, Connecticut, Delaware, England and Romani

grund

Brigid Grund- Doctoral Student (Archaeology)

bgrund@uwyo.edu

Research interests: My research interests include applications of GIS in archaeology and anthropology, hunter-gatherer subsistence, soil microbiology in archaeological contexts, using archaeological information to help solve contemporary world problems, and the impact of archaeology on cultural memory. I'm also a fieldwork junkie, and I have worked on academic projects, in private CRM, for the Forest Service, and as a volunteer since I was in high school.

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James Gunn- Masters Student (Biological Anthropology)

jgunn2@uwyo.edu

Research interests: My interests are in education and medical anthropology.  My current research is in methods of teaching the four field approach to students, and the multiplicity of anthropologies..

Nathaniel Kitchel

Nathaniel Kitchel- Doctoral Student (Archaeology)

nkitchel@uwyo.edu

Research Interests: The primary focus of my research to date focuses on Paleoindian subsistence behaviors in northeastern North America, particularly northern New England. Specifically I have investigated Paleoindian relationships with plant resources in the Northeast. I am also interested in lithics and flint knapping.

Elizabeth Lynch

Elizabeth Lynch- Doctoral Student (Archaeology)

elynch2@uwyo.edu

Research Interests: My research centers on building a conceptual framework for understanding social and communal gathering landscapes of prehistoric peoples of southeastern Colorado and northeastern New Mexico. I am interested in developing a model to explore the distribution, form and function of bedrock grinding areas as a social landscape unique in this area. I am interested in cognitive mapping, landscape knowledge and perception of the land through a study of Jicarilla narratives and other oral traditions in this region. I am currently exploring how to incorporate confocal light microscopy, GIS and photogrammetry in my research.

Justin McKeel

Justin McKeel- Masters Student (Archaeology)

jmckeel@uwyo.edu

Research Interests: My research interests include the archaeology of hunter-gatherer populations, North American prehistory, lithic analysis, and the history of archaeology. My past research extends from the Paleoindian period forward to 18th century pioneers in western Pennsylvania. I have conducted and engaged in fieldwork throughout the eastern United States, particularly in the Mid-Atlantic region. Currently I also serve as a regional advisory editor for the scholarly journal, North American Archaeologist.

mackie

Madeline Mackie- Masters/Doctoral Student (Archaeology)

mmackie@uwyo.edu

Research Interests:I am originally from Southern California and received by Bachelor’s from University of California, Davis.  I have participated in fieldwork in California, Nevada, and Wyoming and have worked for both CRM and the US Forest Service.  My research interests include North American hunter-gatherers, quantitative methods, three-dimensional photogrammetry, and locating children in the prehistoric record.
kevin_malloy

Kevin Malloy- Doctoral Student (Archaeology)

kmalloy1@uwyo.edu

Research interests:
My research is focused on the nearly forgotten park landscapes of medieval Scotland.  These giant earthwork or stone structures were typically associated with the elite echelons of society.  I am specifically interested in expanding the currently narrow view of parks as simple aristocratic hunting enclosures to explore parks as multi-functional, complex structures.  My primary focus is aimed at understanding the role of managed woodlands incorporated within parks, within the larger context of changing climates and widespread deforestation.  Were people building parks as a means of controlling an increasingly limited natural resource, timber?  How did these structures fit into the context of the wider medieval landscape?  My methodologies have been focused primarily on historical archival research, archaeological excavation, and paleoenvironmental records.  Aside from my current research, I am extremely interested in how people interact with their environments and shape and design the landscape.  Everything we do alters the landscape around us and there is clear evidence for it in the archaeological record.  This has led me to focus on various elements of zooarchaeology, geoarchaeology, and paleoenvironmental reconstructions to try and understand how we change the land.
messing

Danielle Messing- Masters Student (Biological Anthropology)

dmessing@uwyo.edu

Research interests: I am interested in using zooarchaeology to aid public wildlife management decisions and better understand how we have interacted with animal species in the past (and hopefully how we can best interact with them in the future). My thesis involves using critical discourse analysis to examine wolf ecology and developments in conservation in the Yellowstone and Bridger-Teton area over the last several decades. I am double majoring in Environment and Natural Resources and am also interested in applying GIS in archaeological contexts. I have been involved with historical archaeology in Missouri related to the Boone family, applied marine zooarchaeology in Jamaica, and academic as well as CRM archaeology in Wyoming.

Kevin Mieras

Kevin Mieras- Masters Student (Archaeology)

kmieras@uwyo.edu

Research interests: My research interests include GIS predictive modeling of prehistoric archaeological sites, primarily high altitude paleoindian sites in the Rocky Mountain west. 

 

Christy Montgomery

Christy Montgomery - Masters Student (Archaeology)

cchady@uwyo.edu

Research Interests: mountain archaeology, landscapes, anthropology of religion, GIS, spatial analysis

 

 

Meg Morris

Meg Morris- Doctoral Student (Archaeology)

mmorris@uwyo.edu

Research Interests: Primarily, I am interested in the application of geographic information systems (GIS) and corresponding theory and methods to archaeological research questions. My dissertation research focuses specifically on how archaeologists integrate (or don't integrate) GIS outputs and analyses into meaningful archaeological interpretations. Other interests include the development of ‘complex' societies and social organization; archaic states; Woodland Period of the Ohio Valley; the Neolithic, Copper and Bronze Ages on the Great Hungarian Plain; and deductive versus inductive approaches to understanding the past.

Spencer Pelton

Spencer Pelton- Doctoral Student (Archaeology)

spelton@uwyo.edu

Research interests: I am from east Tennessee and received my Bachelor’s degree from Middle TN State University and my Master’s degree from Colorado State University.  I have conducted large-scale archaeological survey in a wide variety of circumstances, from the eastern woodlands of the southern Appalachian Mountains, to the western Great Basin desert of northern California and Nevada, and the alpine tundra and high plains of Wyoming and Colorado. My skills include a variety of geospatial techniques and lithic analyses, through which I study regional-scale archaeological phenomena pertaining to prehistoric foragers. My recent research pertains to archaeological sites in the high altitudes of the Colorado Front Range and is presently expanding, more generally, to the study of forager adaptations to mountainous regions worldwide.

 

 


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Greg Pierce- Doctoral Student (Archaeology)

gpierce@uwyo.edu

Research interests: My research interests include contact studies, trade systems, cut mark analysis, dendrochronology, and the use of GIS in archaeological analysis. I have worked on prehistoric, protohistoric, and early historic projects in the Southeastern United States and on the High Plains and Central Rocky Mountain regions of the American West. My dissertation research focuses on the impact of Euroamerican items on indigenous systems on the High Plains and in the Central Rocky Mountains during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Megan Preston

Megan Preston- Masters Student (Biological Anthropology)

mpresto2@uwyo.edu

Research interests: I am interested in studying Neanderthals, specifically the regional and clinal variations between distinct Neanderthal groups. My other interests include Osteology, Paleoanthropology, Post-war studies, and Genetics.

h_rockwell

Heather Rockwell- Doctoral Student (Archaeology)

hrockwel@uwyo.edu

Heather Rockwell’s research interests include: hunter-gatherers, lithic analysis, experimental archaeology, microwear analysis, North American Prehistory, Old World prehistory, and quantitative methods. Heather’s current research is examining the effects of mobility on tool kit utilization during the Paleoindian period. For her dissertation she is examining a large sample of lithic artifacts from several Paleoindian sites for evidence of utilization. Her field research is focused primarily in New England and the Canadian Maritimes but she has also conducted field work in Texas, Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Canada, and the Atacama Desert of Chile.

Paul Santarone

Paul Santarone- Doctoral Student (Archaeology)

psantaro@uwyo.edu

Research Interests: Paleoindian (especially Clovis) archaeology, technology, lithics, experimental archaeology, archaeological field method.

Christina Servetnick

Christina Servetnick- Masters Student (Archaeology)

cservetn@uwyo.edu

Research interests: My research interests include gender archaeology, the foodways of the Plains and Rocky Mountains, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. I have worked in California, the Midwest, the Mid-Atlantic, and Wyoming.

Stacy Sewell

Stacy Sewell - Doctoral Student (Cultural Anthropology)

ssewell1@uwyo.edu

Research interests: Currently I am interested in religious change and the effects of colonialism, particularly the imposition and adoption of Christian ideals and their integration into native religions. Some regions of interest include the northwest coast of the United States, specifically cultures of the San Juan Islands and Vancouver Island, the Great Plains, and Arctic Alaska.

shimek

Rachael Shimek - Masters/Doctoral Student (Archaeology)

rshimek@uwyo.edu

Research interests: Includes zooarchaeology (especially the functional/utilitarian aspects of the human-dog relationship in prehistory), hunter-gatherer mobility and migration, the colonization of North America, and GIS applications in archaeology.  I am regionally focused on the Great Plains and Midwest.

starks

Jessica Starks - Masters Student (Archaeology)

jstarks@uwyo.edu

Research interests: My research interests include: hunter-gather archaeology, North American prehistory, lithics, GIS application to archaeology, geoarchaeology, archaeological field methods, museum studies, curation, and cultural records. My research focus is on North American prehistoric hunter-gatherers. Specifically, I am interested in the land use and mobility of Plains Paleoindians. My field work has predominately been in my home state of Oklahoma as well as other Southern Plains states. I have also had the opportunity to work on sites in New Hampshire and Wyoming.

ana_porras

Ana Vides Porras - Doctoral Student (Cultural Anthropology)

avidespo@uwyo.edu

Research interests: My research is focused on relational and social aspects of traditional medicine in Guatemala, specifically the Maya case.  I am interested in understanding the different social layers that interact when patients use traditional healers, including the nuclear and extended family and other members of the community. I am currently exploring the construction of a “therapeutic unit” composed by the healer, the patient and other family members that enhances treatment compliance and efficacy. I have been working for two years with healers, Maya councils and other PhD. students in the reconstruction of Maya traditional healing practices with five Mayan ethno linguistic groups.

Norbert Wasilik- Doctoral Student (Archaeology)

norbertw@uwyo.edu, website



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