nutcracker

Department of Zoology and Physiology

Program in Ecology

Evolutionary Biology

Birds of Wyoming

Biodiversity Institute

Contact information:

Office: Berry Center 149
Lab: Biological Sciences 439

Mailing Address:
Department of Zoology & Physiology, 3166
University of Wyoming
1000 E. University Ave.
Laramie, WY 82071

Office Ph: (307) 766-2978
Lab Ph: (307) 766-4906
Fax: (307) 766-5625
email


Publications (with PDFs)

Jump to a span of years:

2006-2010
2001-2005
1996-2000
1991-1995
1984-1990


2014

Talluto, M. V., and C. W. Benkman. 2014. Conflicting selection from fire and seed predation drives fine-scaled phenotypic variation in a widespread North American conifer. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 111:9543-9548. PDF

Mezquida, E. T., and C. W. Benkman. 2014. Causes of variation in biotic interaction strength and phenotypic selection along an altitudinal gradient. Evolution 68:1710–21. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 2013. Biotic interaction strength and the intensity of selection. Ecology Letters 16:1054-1560. Abstract F1000Prime recommended

Benkman, C. W., and T. L. Parchman. 2013. When directional selection reduces geographic variation in traits mediating species interactions. Ecology and Evolution 3:961-970. PDF

Talluto, M. V., and C. W. Benkman. 2013. Landscape-scale eco-evolutionary dynamics: selection by seed predators and fire determine a major reproductive strategy. Ecology 94:1307-1316. PDF Appendix A, Appendix B, Appendix C

Benkman, C. W., J. W. Smith, M. Maier, L. Hansen, and M. V. Talluto. 2013. Consistency and variation in phenotypic selection exerted by a community of seed predators. Evolution 67:157-169. PDF

Smith, J. W., S. M. Sjoberg, M. C. Mueller, and C. W. Benkman. 2012. Assortative flocking in crossbills and implications for ecological speciation. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B 279:4223-4229. PDF

Parchman, T. L., Z. Gompert, J. Mudge, F. D. Schilkey, C. W. Benkman, and C. A. Buerkle. 2012. Genome-wide association genetics of an adaptive trait in lodgepole pine. Molecular Ecology 21:2991-3005. PDF

Benkman, C. W., T. Fetz, and M. V. Talluto. 2012. Variable resource availability when resource replenishment is constant: the coupling of predators and prey. Auk 129:115-123. PDF

Santisteban, L., C. W. Benkman, T. Fetz, and J. W. Smith. 2012. Survival and population size of a resident bird species are declining as temperature increases. Journal of Animal Ecology 81:352–363. PDF

Myczko, Ł., and C. W. Benkman. 2011. Great Spotted Woodpeckers Dendrocopos major exert multiple forms of phenotypic selection on Scots pine Pinus sylvestris. Journal of Avian Biology 42:429-433. PDF

Parchman, T. L., C. W. Benkman, B. Jenkins, and C. A. Buerkle. 2011. Low levels of population genetic structure in lodgepole pine across a geographic mosaic of coevolution. American Journal of Botany 98:669-679. PDF

 

2010

Benkman C. W., T. L. Parchman, and E. T. Mezquida. 2010. Patterns of coevolution in the adaptive radiation of crossbills. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1206:1-16. PDF

Berry, R. B., C. W. Benkman, A. Muela, Y. Seminario, and M. Curti. 2010. Isolation and decline of an Orange-breasted Falcon population. Condor 112:479-489. PDF

Parchman, T. L., K. S. Geist, J. A. Grahnen, C. W. Benkman,and C. A. Buerkle. 2010. Transcriptome sequencing in an ecologically important tree species: assembly, annotation, and marker discovery. BMC Genomics 11:180. PDF

Mezquida, E. T., and C. W. Benkman. 2010. Habitat area and structure affect the impact of seed predators and the potential for coevolutionary arms races. Ecology 91:802-814. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 2010. Diversifying coevolution between crossbills and conifers. Evolution: Education and Outreach 3:47-53. PDF

Siepielski, A. M., and C. W. Benkman. 2010. Conflicting selection from an antagonist and a mutualist enhances phenotypic variation in a plant. Evolution 64:1120-1128. PDF

Benkman, C. W., and T. L. Parchman. 2009. Coevolution between crossbills and black pine: the importance of competitors, forest area, and resource stability. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22:942-953. PDF

Snowberg, L. K., and C. W. Benkman 2009. Mate choice based on a key ecological performance trait. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22:762-769. PDF

Garcia, R., A. M. Siepielski, and C. W. Benkman. 2009. Cone and seed trait variation in whitebark pine Pinus albicaulis (Pinaceae) and the potential for phenotypic selection. American Journal of Botany 96:1050-1054. PDF

Benkman, C. W., J. W. Smith, P. C. Keenan, T. L. Parchman, and L. Santisteban. 2009. A new species of red crossbill (Fringillidae: Loxia) from Idaho. Condor 111:169-176. PDF

Siepielski, A. M., and C. W. Benkman. 2008. Seed predation and selection exerted by a seed predator influence subalpine tree densities. Ecology 89:2960-2966. PDF

Siepielski, A. M., and C. W. Benkman. 2008. A seed predator drives the evolution of a seed dispersal mutualism. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B. 275:1917-1925. PDF

Keenan, P. C., and C. W. Benkman. 2008. Call imitation and call modification in Red Crossbills. Condor 110:93-101. PDF

Parchman, T. L., and C. W. Benkman. 2008. The geographic selection mosaic for ponderosa pine and crossbills: a tale of two squirrels. Evolution 62:348-360. Contact me for reprint. Editor's Choice writeup of paper PDF

Benkman, C. W., A. M. Siepielski, and T. L. Parchman. 2008. The local introduction of strongly interacting species and the loss of geographic variation in species and species interactions. Molecular Ecology 17:395-404. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 2007. Red crossbill types in Colorado: their ecology, evolution and distribution. Colorado Birds 41:153-163. PDF

Parchman, T. L., C. W. Benkman, and E. T. Mezquida. 2007. Coevolution between Hispaniolan crossbills and pine: Does more time allow for greater phenotypic escalation at lower latitude? Evolution 61:2142-2153. PDF

Snowberg, L. K., and C. W. Benkman. 2007. The role of marker traits in the assortative mating within red crossbills, Loxia curvirostra complex. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 20:1924-1932. PDF

Siepielski, A. M., and C. W. Benkman. 2007. Extreme environmental variation sharpens selection that drives the evolution of a mutualism. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B 274:1799-1805. PDF. Supplementary figure and tables can be found here: Figure 1, Table 1, and Table 2.

Siepielski, A. M., and C. W. Benkman. 2007. Selection by a pre-dispersal seed predator constrains the evolution of avian seed dispersal in pines. Functional Ecology 21:611-618. PDF

Siepielski, A. M., and C. W. Benkman. 2007. Convergent patterns in the selection mosaic for two North American bird-dispersed pines. Ecological Monographs 77:203-220. PDF The supplements for this paper can be located here. PDF for an article in Science that highlights this paper and the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution.

Smith, J. W., and C. W. Benkman 2007. A coevolutionary arms race causes ecological speciation in crossbills. American Naturalist 169:455-465. PDF, Appendix PDF

MolEcoCoverMezquida, E. T., S. J. Slater, and C. W. Benkman. 2006. Sage-grouse and indirect interactions: potential implications of coyote control on sage-grouse populations. Condor 108:747-759. PDF

Edelaar, P., and C. W. Benkman. 2006. Replicated population divergence caused by localised coevolution? A test of three hypotheses in the red crossbill-lodgepole pine system. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 19:1651-1659. PDF

Parchman, T. L., C. W. Benkman, and S. C. Britch. 2006. Patterns of genetic variation in the adaptive radiation of New World crossbills (Aves: Loxia). Molecular Ecology 15:1873-1887. PDF

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2005

Benkman, C. W., J. S. Colquitt, W. R. Gould, T. Fetz, P. C. Keenan, and L. Santisteban. 2005. Can selection by an ectoparasite drive a population of red crossbills from its adaptive peak? Evolution 59:2025-2032. PDF

Siepielski, A. M., and C. W. Benkman. 2005. A role for habitat area in the geographic mosaic of coevolution between red crossbills and lodgepole pine. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 18:1042-1049. PDF

Mezquida, E. T., and C. W. Benkman. 2005. The geographic selection mosaic for squirrels, crossbills and Aleppo pine. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 18:348-357. PDF

Benkman, C. W. and A. M. Siepielski. 2004. A keystone selective agent? Pine squirrels and the frequency of serotiny in lodgepole pine. Ecology 85:2082-2087. PDF

Siepielski, A. M., and C. W. Benkman. 2004. Interactions among moths, crossbills, squirrels and lodgepole pine in a geographic selection mosaic. Evolution 58:95-101. PDF

Benkman, C. W., T. L. Parchman, A. Favis, and A. M. Siepielski. 2003. Reciprocal selection causes a coevolutionary arms race between crossbills and lodgepole pine. American Naturalist 162: 182-194. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 2003. Divergent selection drives the adaptive radiation of crossbills. Evolution 57:1176-1181. PDF, Editors' Choice PDF

Parchman, T. L., and C. W. Benkman. 2002. Diversifying coevolution between crossbills and black spruce on Newfoundland. Evolution 56:1663-1672. PDF

Hulme, P., and C. W. Benkman. 2002. Granivory. Pages 132-154 in Plant-animal interactions: an evolutionary approach. C. Herrera and O. Pellmyr, eds. Blackwell Scientific Publications, New York. PDF

Benkman, C. W., W. C. Holimon, and J. W. Smith. 2001. The influence of a competitor on the geographic mosaic of coevolution between crossbills and lodgepole pine. Evolution 55:282-294. PDF

Bardwell, E., C. W. Benkman, and W. R. Gould. 2001. Adaptive geographic variation in Western Scrub-jays. Ecology 82:2617-2627. PDF

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2000

Benkman, C. W. 1999. The selection mosaic and diversifying coevolution etween crossbills and lodgepole pine. American Naturalist 154:S75-S91. PDF

Smith, J. W., C. W. Benkman, and K. Coffey. 1999. The use and mis-use of public information by foraging red crossbills. Behavioral Ecology 10:54-62. PDF

Coffey, K., C. W. Benkman, and B. G. Milligan. 1999. The adaptive significance of spines on pine cones. Ecology 80:1221-1229. PDF

Holimon, W. C., C. W. Benkman, and M. F. Willson. 1998. The importance of mature conifers to red crossbills in southeast Alaska. Forest Ecology and Management 102:167-172. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1997. Feeding behavior, flock-size dynamics, and variation in sexual selection in crossbills. Auk 114:163-178. PDF

Benkman, C. W., and R. E. Miller. 1996. Morphological evolution in response to fluctuating selection. Evolution 50:2499-2504. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1996. Are the ratios of bill crossing morphs in crossbills the result of frequency-dependent selection? Evolutionary Ecology 10:119-126. PDF

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1995

Benkman, C. W. 1995. The impact of tree squirrels (Tamiasciurus) on limber pine seed dispersal adaptations. Evolution 49:585-592. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1995. Wind dispersal capacity of pine seeds, with comments on the evolution of different seed dispersal modes in pines. Oikos 73: 221-224. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1994. Comments on the ecology and status of the Hispaniolan crossbill (Loxia leucoptera megaplaga), with recommendations for its conservation. Caribbean Journal of Science 30:250-254. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1993. Adaptation to single resources and the evolution of crossbill (Loxia) diversity. Ecological Monographs 63:305-325. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1993. Logging, conifers, and the conservation of crossbills. Conservation Biology 7:473-479. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1993. The evolution, ecology, and decline of the Red Crossbill of Newfoundland. American Birds 47:225-229. PDF

Benkman, C. W. and A. K. Lindholm. 1991. The advantages and evolution of a morphological novelty. Nature 349:519-520. PDF News & Views PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1991. Predation, seed size partitioning, and the evolution of body size in seed-eating finches. Evolutionary Ecology 5:118-127. PDF

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1990

Benkman, C. W. 1990. Foraging rates and the timing of crossbill reproduction. Auk 107:376-386. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1989. On the evolution and ecology of island populations of crossbills. Evolution 43:1324-1330. PDF Writeup in TREE by Stuart Pimm PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1989. Intake rate maximization and the foraging behaviour of crossbills. Ornis Scandinavica 20:65-68. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1989. Breeding opportunities, foraging rates, and parental care in White-winged Crossbills. Auk 106:483-485. PDF

Benkman, C. W., and H. R. Pulliam. 1988. The comparative feeding rates of North American sparrows and finches. Ecology 69:1195-1199. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1988. Seed handling efficiency, bill structure, and the cost of bill specialization for crossbills. Auk 105:715-719. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1988. Why White-winged Crossbills do not defend feeding territories. Auk 105:370-371. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1988. On the advantages of crossed mandibles: an experimental approach. Ibis 130:288-293. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1987. Food profitability and the foraging ecology of crossbills. Ecological Monographs 57:251-267. PDF

Benkman, C. W. 1987. Crossbill foraging behavior, bill structure, and patterns of food profitability. Wilson Bulletin 99:351-368. PDF

Benkman, C. W., R. P. Balda, and C. C. Smith. 1984. Adaptations for seed dispersal and the compromises due to seed predation in limber pine. Ecology 65:632-642. PDF

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