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Department of Botany|College of Arts and Sciences

Elise Pendall

Associate Professor

Specialization: Ecosystem Ecology and Biogeochemistry


E-mail: e.pendall@uws.edu.au

Education

B.S. Cornell University, 1983
M.S. University of California-Berkeley, 1989
Ph.D. University of Arizona, 1997

Courses

Vegetation Ecology, Ecosystem Ecology, Biogeochemistry, Ecological Consequences of Global Change, Wyoming in the Earth System

Research Emphasis

I conduct research on carbon and water fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, and on the effects of global changes such as increasing carbon dioxide concentrations and land-use change on these fluxes. An important component of my work involves the use of stableisotopes as tracers to better quantify small changes in these fluxes that might not otherwise be detected. Much of my research focuses on belowground carbon pools and processes to better characterize their role in ecosystem responses to global change.

Current Research Projects

Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment investigates impacts of elevated CO2 and warming on native and disturbed grasslands in Wyoming
Ecosystem consequences of bark beetle mortality
Precipitation seasonality in Interior Alaska

Selected Publications (* is student or postdoc)

 

Pendall, E., *Schwendenmann, L., Tans, P.P., Rahn, T., Miller, J.B. 2010. Fluxes of CO2, CH4, CO, N2O and H2 and isotope source signatures estimated from nocturnal boundary layers in forest and pasture sites in Panama. Global Change Biology 16: 2721-2736.

*Carrillo, Y., Pendall, E., Dijkstra, F.A., Morgan, J.A., Newcomb, J. 2010. Carbon input control over soil organic matter dynamics is a temperate grassland exposed to elevated CO2 and warming. Biogeosciences Disc. 7: 1575-1602.

Dangi, S.R., Stahl, P.D., Pendall, E. Cleary, M.B., and Buyer, J.S. 2010. Recovery of soil microbial community structure after fire in a sagebrush-grassland ecosystem. Land Degradation and Development 21: 423-432.

Dijkstra, F.A., Blumenthal, D., Morgan, J.A., Pendall, E., Carrillo, Y., Follett, R.F.  2010. Contrasting effects of elevated CO2 and warming on nitrogen cycling in a semiarid grassland. New Phytologist 187: 426-437.

*Cleary, M.B., Pendall, E., Ewers, B.E. Aboveground and belowground carbon pools after fire in mountain big sagebrush steppe. Rangeland Ecology and Management 63: 187-196.

*Bachman, S.A., Heisler-White, J., Pendall, E., Williams, D.G., and Morgan, J.A., 2010. Elevated carbon dioxide alters impacts of precipitation pulses on ecosystem  photosynthesis and respiration in a semi-arid grassland. Oecologia 162: 179-802.

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