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Communication & Journalism Department|College of Arts and Sciences
 

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Communication and Journalism
1000 E. University Ave.
Dept. 3904
Laramie, WY 82072
Phone: (307) 766-3122
Fax: (307) 766-5293
Email: cojoofc@uwyo.edu
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Students interested in careers in communication and journalism will find that our department offers a broad range of professional and research courses in a sound interdisciplinary academic program. Courses include writing, speaking and analyzing messages; forms of interpersonal communication; mass media effects and audiences' interpretations of media messages and images.

Students can earn degrees in communication and journalism. Within these degree areas, students may specialize in new media, news/editorial, public relations, advertising, photojournalism, cross-cultural communication, rhetoric, or visual communication. Other career opportunities include human relations, consulting, education, sales, business promotion and diversity training. The department encourages students to pursue internships, and couples academic preparation with unique opportunities for professional experience.

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Department news

Assistant Professor Kristen Landreville recently had an article accepted for publication in the journal Communication Studies. The article investigates the on-screen visuals presented during the broadcast of the final presidential debate in 2012. Dr. Landreville and her coauthors (Caitlin White, the University of Memphis, and Sam Allen, the University of Pittsburgh) found that on-screen visuals (e.g., tweets and polls) emphasized strategy and “the horserace” over policy debate and issues. They also found a slight Democratic candidate advantage in the on-screen visuals, and they found that media professionals and other “elite” sources were more often referenced that average citizens. Dr. Landreville hopes to continue this line of research in two years during the next presidential election.

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Dr. George Gladney is interviewed on "Wyoming Signatures."

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