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Spring 2019 Courses

Course Descriptions: Spring 2019

 

NON-WESTERN COURSES

HP 2151: The Empire Writes Back: 3 cr, CRN: 23656, A&S Global Core, T 1:20-4:00pm, Instructor: Diane Panozzo

This course is an introduction to Postcolonial literature and studies with the focus on African writers and writers who have written about the “postcolonial period” in Africa. This seminar will take an episodic approach that avoids both a linear narrative of the field and the survey tendency with its claim to an “overview.” The course is conceived as a series of loosely- connected excursions into a vast field of inquiry, asking more questions than it answers. What does the term “post colonialism” mean? When exactly does the postcolonial begin? What are the theoretical and political implications of using such an umbrella term to designate the ensemble of writings by those subjects whose identities and histories have been shaped by the colonial encounter?

Some of the important African writers we will read; Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, J.M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, Athol Fugard, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and others.

HP 2151: Modern Japanese Society and Culture CRN: 26693 ONLINE USP- (H) Humanities; A&S Global Core, Instructor: Noah Miles

This course is designed to introduce Japanese society and culture. The class will take a thematic approach to the study of Japan. We will integrate history and literature from the Jomon to the Edo periods, covering a diverse range of topics including: language development, the introduction of Buddhism, poetry, classical and modern literature, traditional arts and holidays concluding with the development of popular culture.

HP 3152: Inuit Environmental Dilemmas: 3 cr, CRN: 26402, TR 11:00-12:15pm, A&S Diversity under review Instructor: Joslyn Cassady

The Arctic is experiencing rapid environmental change due largely to human activities in the south. Three of the processes that are creating the most dramatic changes in Arctic ecosystems are the transnational flow of industrial toxins, climate change, and intensified resource exploration and extraction. This course focuses on how these three processes are affecting the livelihood of roughly 160,000 Inuit living in Siberia, Alaska, Canada and Greenland. By focusing on Inuit strategies and engagements, this course will dispel enduring misconceptions of northern peoples as passive victims of outside forces while simultaneously examining the considerable challenges that they face in maintaining control of their lives and land. Ultimately, this course exposes how our own lifestyles are exacerbating environmental injustices and culture change in the Far North.

HP 3153: Language and Tradition in Modern Mexico, CRN: 27908 ONLINE, USP- (H) Humanities, Instructor: Mary Katherine Scott

Operating under the broad themes of “Contact, Conquest, and Revolution,” this course examines Mexico’s cultural and historical trajectories from 1519 forward. This “deep dive” into Mexico occurs within the broader context of Latin America, a geographic place, but also a postcolonial construct. In addition to historical framing, readings and other creative works will provide the foundation for analyzing further aspects of Mexican consciousness, in particular the tension between tradition and modernity that emerged following Spain’s colonization of the Americas in the 16th century. By focusing our analysis throughout the semester on this dichotomy, we will examine and critique the sociocultural, political, and economic discourses that have shaped Mexican cultural identity from the point of Spanish contact forward.

In addition to the semester-long 3-credit course online, students will have the option to enroll and participate in a 1-credit faculty-led study abroad program in Yucatan, Mexico during the Spring Break week. Additional details about this opportunity and how to apply can be found on the Honors College website: www.uwyo.edu/honors/courses-abroad

 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES (all Honors students need two)

HP 3151: Stealing Culture: 3 cr, CRN: 22370, R 4:10-6:50pm, Instructors: Nicole Crawford and Darrell Jackson

In one five-minute sequence, the new blockbuster Marvel movie Black Panther raises issues central to the modern museum world, including cultural appropriation and repatriation, the racial composition of museum staffs, and lingering stereotypes regarding visitors of color. Some of these concerns have been in the public consciousness since the 1980s, when the Greek government began campaigning forcefully — and so far unsuccessfully — for the British Museum to repatriate the Elgin Marbles, a group of classical sculptures removed from the Parthenon. But these issues have a fresh relevance today as society increasingly shifts away from a Eurocentric points of view and gains a renewed appreciation for the indigenous culture of formerly colonized nations.

Analyzing all the different forms of theft that directly impact museums: cultural, fraudulent, and physical. This interdisciplinary class introduces students to the laws governing and the circumstances behind topics regarding visual arts as cultural goods, international theft and smuggling of works of art, forgery, art museums, architectural preservation and related matter. Specific cases will be discussed each week from both the practical and theoretical point of view. Students will engage issues where art and law intersect through reading and discussion, writing, research and oral presentation, critical appraisal of specific events, and meeting with art, museum and law professionals.

HP 3152: How to Overthrow a Government; 3 cr, CRN: 27906, MWF 1:10-2:00pm, Instructor: Erin Abraham

This course will examine various revolutions in non-Western history, including the Haitian Revolution, the Russian Revolution, China’s Cultural Revolution, and the Iranian Revolution. We will examine each of these cultural and political movements individually through text, images, and film, and apply comparative investigation of these events to test the legitimacy of binary categories such as West vs. non-West.

HP 3152: Inuit Environmental Dilemmas: 3 cr, CRN: 26402, TR 11:00-12:15pm, Instructor: Joslyn Cassady

The Arctic is experiencing rapid environmental change due largely to human activities in the south. Three of the processes that are creating the most dramatic changes in Arctic ecosystems are the transnational flow of industrial toxins, climate change, and intensified resource exploration and extraction. This course focuses on how these three processes are affecting the livelihood of roughly 160,000 Inuit living in Siberia, Alaska, Canada and Greenland. By focusing on Inuit strategies and engagements, this course will dispel enduring misconceptions of northern peoples as passive victims of outside forces while simultaneously examining the considerable challenges that they face in maintaining control of their lives and land. Ultimately, this course exposes how our own lifestyles are exacerbating environmental injustices and culture change in the Far North.

HP 3152: Marketing Manhattan: 3 cr, CRN: 26403, BLOCKED CLASS, Instructor: Kent Drummond

Meeting Dates: Mar 27: 6-10pm, Mar 30: 9am-4pm, Apr 6: 9am-4pm, Apr 10: 6-10pm, REQUIRED TRIP-April 20-25, May 8: 6-10pm, May 11: 9am-1pm

After the tragedy of 9-11, many pundits predicted the (continued) demise of New York City. After the fall of the twin towers, who would want to live in, visit, or even think about New York except with pity, anger, or regret? Thirteen years, later, Manhattan has emerged triumphantly from the rubble: clean, bright, safe, heavily and (mostly) healthfully consumed. How did this drastic change take place in so short a time? Our class will answer this question by exploring the ways in which the sites, monuments (literal and figurative) and experiences of Manhattan have been marketed, from Madison Square Garden to Lincoln Center, from Wall Street to Central Park. The course concludes with an optional trip to Manhattan, to witness first- hand how the city has reinvented itself once again.

HP 3152: Mass Media and Collective Consciousness, 3 cr; CRN: 27945 ONLINE USP- (H) Humanities, Instructor: Adrian Molina, JD

This is a topics course that addresses the following contemporary issues: the development of collective consciousness; the history of propaganda; functions of mass media; the rise of corporate media as big business; how mass media affects public opinion; journalism and ethical considerations; pop culture's relationship to American values and standards; the nature of news coverage and news filters; access to media and social justice concerns; functions of art and entertainment; critiques of mass media and pop culture; alternative forms of media, social media consumption, futurism, Afrofuturism and Indigenous futurism, and various issues surrounding technology, sustainability and humanity.

HP3153: Wyoming Walkabout; 3 cr; CRN: 27909, BLOCKED CLASS, Instructor: Paul Taylor

Meeting Dates: Jan 30: 7-10pm, Feb 6: 7-10pm, Feb 9: 1-5pm, Feb 20: 7-10pm, Feb 23: 8am-5pm, Mar 6: 7-10pm, Mar 9: 8am-5pm

A unique experiential exposure to the "world's oldest living culture." Students will explore Australia's 50,000 year old Aboriginal culture lead by educator/artist Paul Taylor (www.paultaylor.ws). Mentored by elder Yidumduma Bill Harney, senior custodian of the Wardaman culture, students will be guided by video material collected over 15 years by Paul's Yubulyawan Dreaming Project (www.ydproject.com). Students will study the 10 video chapters on this site and be participants in this continuing research. We will explore what it is to be indigenous, participate in song, dance, painting and ceremony. We will learn the Wardaman Creation Story; apply storytelling in class; make, play and decorate a didgeridoo. We will work together on a class mural, teaching to “Care for our Country” and depicting our personal "Walkabouts" or "Songlines", our ceremonial life journeys.

HP 3153: Writing Animals: 3cr; CRN: 22062, Instructor: Kate Northrop

Our worlds are not the only worlds. We live with and beside the non-human animals: pronghorn, Swainson’s hawks, lap dogs, mountain lions straying through town, pine beetles, Mourning Cloaks, drowned kittens, nighthawks overhead, raccoons in the kitchen, Mountain Whitefish. How do we sound these worlds? And why? To what ends? Writers have long looked to and imagined the non-human, but how do we do that? How do we write (and think) that which we name but may not be able to fully know? In this course we will consider (through class discussion of assigned readings, independent research, writing exercises and semester-long creative writing projects) ways of thinking / representing non-human animals and our relationships with them. In this course, we will approach and mind those relationships.

We will be considering a range of creative work: stories, poems, essays, short videos, dramatic monologues, paintings, photographs. Of each creative piece we will discuss the questions that we read as driving the piece, and the questions the piece raises for us. It’s not possible for me to know our questions now, ahead of time, but some possible questions, or rather, some of my own questions: How do we look at non-human animals? How are we looked at? How do non-human animal and human animal lives intersect? What boundaries have been erected historically and why, to what end? How are our lives shaped by non-human animals? How are non-human animals lives shaped? What responsibilities do humans have? What causes for joy, what concerns?

HP 3153: Language and Tradition in Modern Mexico, 3 cr; CRN: 27908 ONLINE, USP- (H) Humanities, Instructor: Mary Katherine Scott

Operating under the broad themes of “Contact, Conquest, and Revolution,” this course examines Mexico’s cultural and historical trajectories from 1519 forward. This “deep dive” into Mexico occurs within the broader context of Latin America, a geographic place, but also a postcolonial construct. In addition to historical framing, readings and other creative works will provide the foundation for analyzing further aspects of Mexican consciousness, in particular the tension between tradition and modernity that emerged following Spain’s colonization of the Americas in the 16th century. By focusing our analysis throughout the semester on this dichotomy, we will examine and critique the sociocultural, political, and economic discourses that have shaped Mexican cultural identity from the point of Spanish contact forward.

In addition to the semester-long 3-credit course online, students will have the option to enroll and participate in a 1-credit faculty-led study abroad program in Yucatan, Mexico during the Spring Break week. Additional details about this opportunity and how to apply can be found on the Honors College website: www.uwyo.edu/honors/courses-abroad

HP 4151: Religion, Unbelief and the Human Condition; 3 cr; CRN: 22520; TR 11:00-12:15pm, Instructor: Tyler Fall

This course ranges across academic disciplines and examines and questions some of the dominant ideas western civilization has produced about religion, skepticism, unbelief, morality, society, and the ideal human life. We will read authors from antiquity to the present. They have divergent perspectives: some are militant atheists; others are deeply religious. Some are optimistic about human potential and progress; others are starkly pessimistic. The course readings are drawn from a variety of literary genres -- philosophical treatises, poetry, memoirs, drama, and fiction -- but they all circle back to one fundamental question: what should we humans do?"

HP 4151: We are What We Eat; 3 cr; CRN: 26412; TR 1:20-2:35pm, Instructor: Karagh Murphy This will be a USP PN course

In this course, we will integrate the cultural, biological, political and pathological aspects of food consumption. We will dive into the evolution and progression of food processing and governmental regulation, looking into the different influences that have transformed the production of food. We will touch on the advantages and disadvantages of the treatment of food products, such as the creation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). This course will also explore different psychological and pathological states centered on food consumption such as obesity and food addiction.

HP 4152: Diplomacy and Negotiation, 3cr; CRN: 24117; TR 2:45-5:35pm, Instructor: Christopher Rothfuss (Course will begin second half of semester)

This course will focus on the development and practical application of diplomacy and negotiation skills, with extensive use of real world role-playing scenarios. Students will learn negotiation theory and techniques, and will be able to apply them through simulated bilateral and multilateral negotiation exercises. Students will also learn how to operate in a diplomatic setting and as part of a delegation. This course is primarily experiential and should prove to be stimulating and exciting for the participants.

HP 4153: Acting for Lawyers, Politicians, Future CEOs and…, 3cr; CRN: 27910 TR 2:45-4:00pm, Instructor: William Missouri Downs 

In this class students will learn the basics of acting, including character analysis, speech, movement, memorization, and improvisation. They would then apply their lessons by performing scenes based on the actual court transcripts from such infamous trials as O.J. Simpson, McMartin Preschool Abuse, The Chicago Eight, Alger Hiss, The Scopes Monkey Trial, Leopold and Loeb and Oscar Wilde. In addition, students will study and perform speeches by well-known lawyers such as Clarence Darrow, Johnny Connor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, etc. Their final project will be to write their own closing argument speech and perform in front of the class.

HP 4152: Futurism 001, 3cr; CRN: 26692 ONLINE USP- (H) Humanities, Instructor: Adrian Molina, JD

This course is about the present human condition, human diversity, and the future of humanity. Is there any question that we are living in the future? Is there any doubt we are in times of accelerated change and shifting landscapes? Whose future is it? Whose imagination are we living in? It is a time of mass movements for racial and economic justice, new gender orientations, populism and fascism, anti-fascism and mass protests. Mixed reality. Wearable technology. Virtual headsets. Artificial intelligence. Robots. Cyborgs. Self-driving vehicles and flying cars. Singularity. Questions of human survival. Time travel. Quantum leaps… Future Studies 101 places students in the context of present and future times. Most college classes and the bulk of academia revolves around the distant past or recent history, with select courses focusing on current events. While it is critical to study history from a multitude of perspectives, young people know intuitively that we are in different times. The social rules, norms, modes, moods, pace, and dialogue have shifted dramatically over the past decade. Popular media, social media, and social and political movements indicate that further shifts will come in rapid succession. Students now need to study the future as much as they study the past. Given the multitude of present and future problems facing the human species, we have never been more in need of imagination, expansions of consciousness, and forward thinking. Futurism 101 exposes students to various futurist movements of the past 100 years, with a focus on contemporary perspectives of Women of Color, and the futurist movements of people of color. Course topics include: futuristic depictions in popular media and alternative media; philosophies of time and space; future cultural, social and political identities; human agency to determine future life on planet earth; and emerging strategies for social change.


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