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Summer 2020 Courses

Registration Guidelines

Meeting times, locations, CRNs, specific section numbers, are all listed in WyoRecords under the “Look Up Classes” search function. 

If a non-Honors College student wishes to register for a main campus Honors College course, they need to have at least a 3.25 cumulative UW GPA. Non-Honors students may register for on-campus Honors courses starting on May 11. Online Honors classes are open to all students. 

Pre-Requisites: All Honors Upper-Division Classes (3000 and 4000 level) require students to have completed their COM 1 and COM 2 requirements.

Advising Note: Honors Advisors are available to meet with you via distance communication this semester! Emailing honorsadvising@uwyo.edu is the best way to get in touch with us. We will then work with you to answer your questions via email or to set up a phone, Zoom or other platform communication.

*The group Honors Advising sessions previously scheduled for March 25th and March 26th were cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Advising Guidance Powerpoint

 

Course Descriptions

 

HP 3151: Harry Potter, ONLINE
Instructor: Dr. Tammy Mielke
Honors College Attributes: Upper-division elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
This course focuses on gaining a greater understanding of Harry Potter as literary and cultural phenomena. Together, we will study the critical discourse that has emerged over the last decade or so as it relates to the Harry Potter novels and other cultural and artistic manifestations. We will further explore this series in terms of their relation to the world of the Muggles (us); and the broader social and political implications of this series.

 

HP 3151: How to Overthrow a Government, ONLINE
Instructor: Erin Abraham
Honors College attributes: Honors Non-Western. Note: Students who have already completed their Honors Non-Western requirement may use this course as an Honors upper-division elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: (G) Global
This course will examine various revolutions in non-Western history, including the Haitian Revolution, the Russian Revolution, China’s Cultural Revolution, and the Iranian Revolution.  We will examine each of these cultural and political movements individually through text, images, and film, and apply comparative investigation of these events to test the legitimacy of binary categories such as West vs. non-West.

 

HP 3151: Japanese Society and Culture, ONLINE
Instructor: Noah Miles
Honors College attributes: Honors Non-Western. Note: Students who have already completed their Honors Non-Western requirement may use this course as an Honors upper-division elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: (G) Global
This course is designed to introduce Japanese society and culture.  The class will take a thematic approach to the study of Japan.  We will integrate history and literature from the Jomon to the Edo periods, covering a diverse range of topics including: language development, the introduction of Buddhism, poetry, classical and modern literature, traditional arts and holidays concluding with the development of popular culture.

 

HP 3151: Principles of Interactive Fiction, ONLINE
Instructor: Mark John Kretzschmar
Honors College attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none
In this online interdisciplinary digital humanities and digital media summer course, students will learn about introductory coding using HTML and CSS. Students will also be introduced to fundamentals of ludology (the study of video games) as well as the three central types of coded “choices” in video games: mechanical (gameplay), aesthetic, and narrative choices. The affordances and constraints present in these choices can inform students about digital, virtual, and video game design as the lack of radical free will portrayed in interactive media prevents gamers from suddenly changing rules, objectives, or even genre specifications at a moment’s notice as if they were in a physical environment. Game design is complex, but narrative-based video game software tools are a great entry point that allow individuals to make their own creations. The capstone project will be interactive fiction made with either the Ink or Twine toolkits. Each tool’s strengths and weaknesses will be evaluated during the course. For more information on this course see Principles of Interactivity.

 

HP 3152: Modes: Mass Media and Collective Consciousness, ONLINE
Instructor: Adrian Molina
Honors College Attributes: Upper-division elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: none
This course explores the most central and critical issues of our times: Humanity, Technology, and Sustainability.  In this course, the student is the main "Text," meaning that each student will engage in contemplative education practices.  Students will examine their own lives in relationship to technology, mass media, social media, and how the cyborg-ification of our lives affects our physical, mental, and motional health, as well as our relationships with other humans.  

Additionally, this is a topics course that may explore any of the following: the development of collective consciousness; historical uses of propaganda; functions of mass media; the functions of corporate media vs independent media; how mass media affects public opinion; journalism and ethical considerations; pop culture's relationship to American values and standards; the nature of news coverage and news filters; access to media and social justice concerns; functions of art and entertainment; critiques of mass media and pop culture; alternative forms of media; futurist perspectives on human consciousness; ecological and environmental concerns; and real-time developments in technology.   

 

HP 3153: Art and Culture of Hip-Hop, ONLINE 
Instructor: Adrian Molina
Honors College attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: (D) Diversity in the US
This course is an inter- and multi-disciplinary course inspired by human culture.  This course explores a culture and form of music that hundreds of millions of people throughout the world identify with.  Hip-Hop was born in the South Bronx, NY in the early 1970s, where African-American, Latino, and immigrant populations were essentially cast off as a result of the construction of the Cross Bronx Expressway, white flight into the suburbs, and the politics of abandonment.  Hip-Hop music and culture has now spread throughout the world, and regardless of whether the discussion is about mainstream gangster rap or socially and political conscious Hip-Hop, this emerging field of study has broad, cultural, social, political, and economic implications.  Students will research, explore, discuss and write about American historical music influences, the history and development of hip-hop, the various artistic elements of hip-hop, hip-hop as a culture,  hip-hop journalism, and hip-hop’s influence on American society.  Using hip-hop as an academic tool, students will also explore the following issues: race relations, racism, sexism and misogyny, class struggle, urbanization, pan-ethnicity and ethnic/cultural diasporas, civil rights era activism, post-civil rights Black and Latina/o community leadership, activism through art, globalization, the commodification of art and culture in corporate America, the perpetuation of racism and sexism through mass media, alternative forms of cultural media, the poetics of hip-hop, and communication through musical form.  

 

HP 3153: American Popular Music, ONLINE
Instructor: Zachary Taylor
Honors College attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: (D) Diversity
Music as an idea, an expression, a practice, and an experience can create personal feelings of connection, evoke emotional responses, and even bridge language and cultural barriers. This course is an exploration of the ever-growing compendium of songs and genres that make up American Popular Music. As our society’s development of music has evolved, so has its reflection of cultural, political, and technological contexts. American Popular Music addresses “pop” music both in its personal sense (e.g. how individuals interact with music, what role it plays in daily life, etc.) and in its systemic sense (e.g. the record industry, professional musicians, etc.) as they influence American Culture. While some course content will deal with the theory and historical context of popular music, the remainder of the course will focus on the effect of music as a practical application of culture and socialisation.

 

HP 3153: Maya Art and Culture, ONLINE
Instructor: Dr. Mary Katherine Scott
Honors College attributes: Honors Non-Western. Note: Students who have already completed their Honors Non-Western requirement may use this course as an Honors upper-division elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: G (Global Awareness)
Maya Art & Culture explores the confluence of ancient and modern Maya culture through its people, art, archaeology, and cultural traditions. With guidance from targeted readings, content presentations, and reflective and interactive assignments, this course is designed to give students a deep understanding of Maya culture through time. Students will investigate the rich art and architectural traditions of the region, the cultural elements that define the Maya worldview of yesterday and today, and how the pre-Columbian Maya past is simultaneously present and absent in contemporary Maya life. Finally, by studying primary sources from ethnographic data, students will gain insight into the complex processes involved in cultural continuity and change in response to both internal and external pressures.
*For a glimpse into this course see the video below under "The Value of Things" course. 

 

 HP 4153: The Value of Things: Form, Function, and Meaning, ONLINE
Instructor: Dr. Mary Katherine Scott
Honors College attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: none
A&S attributes: none

The way that any object acquires meaning and value is dependent on several factors, including, but not limited to, its age, materiality, aesthetics, history of ownership, utility and portability. This class will challenge some of the generally accepted theories of value by focusing on close readings and discussions of seminal texts from interdisciplinary perspectives. Knowledge gained from these readings and respective discussions will be applied to practical case studies, including examination and interpretation of local and regional object-based collections, and through the analysis of web content at renowned international commercial galleries and public museums.

HP 4153: Saffron, Silk, and Broadswords: A Trek Through Great Civilizations, ONLINE
Instructor: Lori Howe
Honors College attributes: Upper-Division Elective
USP attributes: (H) Human Culture
A&S attributes: none
Through readings, films, popular sources and research, students will explore the complex histories of several great human civilizations via food, art, music, architecture, engineering, medicine, literature, politics, and religion. In this exploration, students will examine ways in which the historical intersections of culture, religion, and politics have impacted our contemporary world. Students will also work independently to conduct interdisciplinary research on a particular civilization, city, nation-state, nation or region of their choosing and do a deep dive into the culture and history of that place, culminating in a multimodal presentation and research paper. 

 

 

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The Honors College

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Phone: 307-766-4110

Fax: 307-766-4298

Email: honors@uwyo.edu

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