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John Connett

Integrated Pest Management

College of Ag and Natural Resources

Ecosystem Science and Management

Department #3354

1000 E. University Ave

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: 307-766-5022

Email: IPMhelp@uwyo.edu

Find us on Twitter (Link opens a new window)

Components of IPM

ipm-model-logo.jpg

 

Components of IPM that are listed below are not all used in every situation. The more complex the farm or entity, the more of these components that are likely to be needed.

Kinds of IPM

Kinds of IPM

Integrated pest management can used for all kinds of pests and is used worldwide in a range of areas, such as Food Services, Structures, Households, Greenhouses, Gardens, Facilities, Livestock Operations, Turf-grass, Rangelands, Forests, Hospitals, Schools, Day Cares, Field Crops, Orchards, National Parks, Communities, Waterways, Growth Chambers, and more.


Prevention

Prevention

An ounce of prevention is literally worth a pound of cure. Prevention is often the most effective method of dealing with weeds and other pests. Eliminating ideal conditions for the pest. Preventive measures can be incorporated into the building design or farm plan. Selecting varieties best for local conditions and maintaining healthy crops helps.


Monitoring

Monitoring

Monitoring is paying close attention to the turf, field, greenhouse, facility or operation. Knowing the state of the system helps prevent smaller issues from becoming larger expenses in time and money. Monitoring identifies factors that contribute to the pest problems, such as poor sanitation or a decline in beneficial organisms. Consistent monitoring is part of evaluating efficacy.


Pest Identification

Pest Identification

Identification of pests is often the first crucial step in solving the problem. Whether your pest is a weed, insect, animal, microbe, or other organism, correct identification can determine if the organism is harmful, beneficial, or benign. Misidentification of pests is a common cause of pest control failure and crop damage. Correct pest identification can make management more effective, often saving time and money.


Maps

Maps

Precision IPM using maps has the potential increase the effectiveness of management efforts. Maps identify where weed and other pest issues are during each season. Historical maps can show where problems have been and may be likely to occur. Maps can be used for forecasting issues and recording scouting and trapping information.


Recordkeeping

Recordkeeping

Records are an important part of scouting and can serve in forecasting when a seasonal pest may appear. May include; weather, crop growth, pest populations, natural enemies, pest control activities. Keeping clear records is important to be able to identify trends in pest populations, and for seeing how well management programs are working. Some pesticide use records are required by law.


Action Thresholds

Action Thresholds

Action thresholds can help discern when action is necessary and when it isn’t. The action threshold or economic threshold is a pest or damage level at which control is initiated to avoid significant damage or loss of property. IPM is flexible and these measurements are not used in situations where there is a zero tolerance for a certain pest.


Analyze and Choose Options

Analyze and Choose Options

Integrated Pest management includes timely decision making that can prevent and control pests. The particular situation will narrow the choices from the generally wide range of methods and options. Understanding the life cycle or what the pest needs to thrive can provide clues to the most efficient way to manage it. Options can range from sanitation to conserving natural enemies.


Educating

Educating

Education helps occupants and stakeholders to know how they can contribute to the overall success. This applies to buildings like hospitals, schools, and daycares, and many other situations like greenhouses, farms and public lands. IPM education materials can be on hand to provide customers, staff and residents to help prevent issues and for when pest problems occur. IPM education can be listed in your IPM Plan.


Biological Control

Biological Control

Biological control uses organisms to control or suppress weed and other pest populations. Biological control agents include pathogens, insects, mites, spiders, nematodes, plants, goats, sheep, horses and falcons. A biocontrol agent should have good searching ability, be pest or host specific, and be well synchronized with the pest. In greenhouses, biocontrol requires an active management role.


Chemical Control

Chemical Control

Pesticides can include many types of compounds and are formulated for a variety of situations. Chemicals are often more useful in combination with other tactics. The pesticide label is your best guide to using pesticides safely and effectively. Rotating pesticides with different modes of action helps minimize pest resistance. Wyoming Department of Agriculture offers pesticide applicator training.


Cultural Control

Cultural Control

Pests require specific living conditions. Cultural controls are modifications of the system that can disrupt ideal pest conditions and decrease pest populations and occurrence. A few examples include the use of crop rotation, plant resistance, cover crops, modifying planting times or plant spacing, mowing height, accurate irrigation, healthy plant competition and cleaning soil from machinery between fields.


Mechanical Control

Mechanical Control

Mechanical control is the management of weeds or pests by physical means. Examples include the use of screens, seals, row covers, pruning, trapping, tilling, mowing, vacuuming, hand-weeding, hoeing, burning, freezing, steaming, mulching, monofilament line to deter birds, caulking, building repair, installing new door sweeps and removal of the pest by hand.


Notification

Notification

Proactive communication between IPM coordinators and others can be helpful for a variety of reasons. Often the best kind of notification for the situation can be decided by the parties involved. In some cases there are laws that detail the communication that is required. Notification can include posting signs to encourage cleaning invasive weed seeds from equipment before entering a new area.


Evaluating

Evaluating

Documenting the results of how well everything worked is an essential component of IPM so we don’t have to relearn how to deal with the same problems over and over. Evaluation uses the systematic collection of information to establish baselines and document changes to determine if changes in the IPM plan are needed going forward.


IPM Policy

IPM Policy

An IPM policy can provide guidance for the IPM program list some of the components of IPM that are especially important for the situation. Policy can help guide decisions and answer questions along the way. The policy might emphasize the importance of reducing certain kinds of risks while achieving the objectives and goals of the entity. Stakeholders can be informed annually about the IPM policy.


IPM Plan

IPM Plan

IPM is proactive instead of reactive and the plan describes who will perform activities and how, where and when activities will be done. The IPM coordinator may update the IPM plan as needed. IPM plan can be a dynamic document that is reviewed annually to ensure the plan contains the most current strategies. The better the plan, the better the success.


Cost and Benefits

Cost and Benefits

IPM may be more labor intensive, require more training and up front resources. However, costs are generally lower over time when the underlying cause of the pest problem has been addressed. IPM practices also provide sustainability and benefits unrelated to pests. For example, weatherization of buildings not only excludes pests but also saves energy and reduces moisture problems.


Inspection

Inspection

The cornerstone of an effective IPM program is a schedule of regular inspections. A detailed assessment is helpful in the beginning of a program and in the case of a weed or pest outbreak. Scouts need to understand the potential type of pests at the location, accurate pest ID, and the conditions conducive to the pests. An inspection is followed by recommendations, actions and follow-up inspections to evaluate.


IPM Coordinator

IPM Coordinator

An IPM coordinator oversees weed and other pest management throughout the organization is typically a manager with operations authority who has knowledge of the pest management needs of the organization. The IPM Coordinator is the first point of contact for pest management requests from stakeholders and acts as a liaison between property managers, building occupants and pest management professionals. IPM Coordinators are responsible for maintaining records of all pest management services, pest inspection reports, pest activity sightings, and pesticide applications. They are also responsible for ensuring all pest management services adhere to the IPM practices outlined in the IPM Plan and are consistent with the overall IPM Policy adopted by the organization. The IPM Coordinator should also serve as an information resource on pest management for interested stakeholders.


Regular IPM Team Meetings

Regular IPM Team Meetings

Team communication enable all parties to understand their roles and responsibilities while finding ways to be more effective in achieving their goals.


IPM Logbook

IPM Logbook

The logbook may contain the following items: Inspection sheets * Pest logs that record the type and number of pests or other indicators of pest population levels revealed by the monitoring program for the site. Examples include: date, number, location, and rodent species trapped or removed, as well as date, number and location of rat burrows observed * Pest sighting forms and action taken * Map noting the location of pest activity including locations of all traps, trapping devices and bait stations in or around the site * a copy of the current registered label and current Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for each pesticide product used, where they were used, and the amount used.


History prior to IPM

History prior to IPM

Before IPM, over-reliance and overuse of pesticides led to: Selection of resistance in pest populations - Destruction of beneficial species - Resurgence of target pest populations - Outbreaks of secondary pests - Hazards to humans and the environment


IPM Infographics

IPM Infographics

This gallery of IPM infographics is intended for educational use for communication about IPM in social media, posters, and presentations.


Contact Us

John Connett

Integrated Pest Management

College of Ag and Natural Resources

Ecosystem Science and Management

Department #3354

1000 E. University Ave

Laramie, WY 82071

Phone: 307-766-5022

Email: IPMhelp@uwyo.edu

Find us on Twitter (Link opens a new window)

1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071
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