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University Catalog|Office of the Registrar

Department of Ecosystem Science and Management

2013 Agriculture Building, 766-2263
FAX: (307) 766-6403
Website: http://uwyo.edu/esm
Department Head: John A. Tanaka

Professors

ANN L. HILD, B.A. University of Iowa 1975; M.S. Texas Tech University 1991; Ph.D. 1995; Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2008, 1996.
DAVID E. LEGG, B.S. University of Missouri 1978; M.S. 1980; Ph.D. University of Minnesota 1983; Professor of Entomology 2003, 1988.
LARRY C. MUNN, B.S. Ohio State University 1972; M.S. 1974; Ph.D. Montana State University 1977; Professor of Soil Science 1992, 1981.
KATTA J. REDDY, B.S. A.P. Agricultural University (India) 1978; M.S. 1980; Ph.D. Colorado State University 1986; Professor of Water Quality 2006, 2000.
SCOTT R. SHAW, B.S. Michigan State University 1977; M.S. University of Maryland 1981; Ph.D. 1984; Professor of Entomology 1998, 1989.
MICHAEL A. SMITH, B.S. Texas Tech University 1967; M.S. 1972; Ph.D. Utah State University 1977; Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 1992, 1978.
Peter D. Stahl, B.S. Oklahoma State University 1978; M.S. University of Wyoming 1982; Ph.D. 1989; Professor of Restoration Ecology 2009, 2000; Director, Wyoming Reclamation and Restoration Center.
JOHN A. TANAKA, B.S. Oregon State University 1978; M.S. 1982; Ph.D. Utah State University 1986; Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2009.
THOMAS L. THUROW, B.S. University of Idaho 1977; M.S. Brigham Young University 1979; Ph.D. Texas A&M University 1985; Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 1999.
JAMES K. WANGBERG, B.A. Humboldt State College 1969; M.A. California State University-Humboldt 1973; Ph.D. University of Idaho 1976; Professor of Entomology 1986; Associate Dean 1999.
DAVID G. WILLIAMS, B.A. University of Texas 1985; M.S. Texas A&M University 1988; Ph.D. Washington State University 1992; Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2009, 2002.

Associate Professors

TIMOTHY R. COLLIER, B.S. University of California-Riverside 1987; Ph.D. University of California-Santa Barbara 1994; Associate Professor of Entomology 2008, 2002.
ALEXANDRE V. LATCHININSKY, B.S. St. Petersburg State University (Russia) 1979; M.S. 1980; Ph.D. University of Wyoming 2001; Associate Professor of Entomology 2008, 2003.
THIJS KELLENERS, B.S. Wageningen University, The Netherlands 1988; M.S. 1993; Ph.D. 2001; Associate Professor 2012.
SCOTT N. MILLER, B.S. Brown University 1991; M.S. University of Arizona 1995; Ph.D. 2002; Associate Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2008, 2002.
JAY B. NORTON, B.S. University of Montana 1985; M.S. Iowa State University 1996; Ph.D. University of Montana 2000; Associate Professor of Soil Science 2012.
VIRGINIA B. PAIGE, B.A. Colorado College 1984; M.S. University of Massachusetts 1992; Ph.D. University of Arizona 2000; Associate Professor Rangeland Ecology and Watershed management 2009, 2004.
J. DANIEL RODGERS, B.S. East Texas State University 1963; M.S. Texas Tech University 1966; Ph.D. Utah State University 1980; Associate Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 1980.
JAMES W. WAGGONER, JR., B.S. New Mexico State University 1970; M.S. 1972; Ph.D. University of Illinois 1975; Associate Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 1994.

Assistant Professors

JEFFREY L. BECK, B.S. Brigham Young University 1993; M.S. 1996; Ph.D. University of Idaho 2003; Assistant Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2012, 2007.
KRISTINA HUFFORD, Assistant Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2012, 2010.
MELANIE MURPHY, B.S. University of Idaho 1998; M.S. 2001; Ph.D. Washington State University 2008; Assistant Professor of Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management 2012, 2010.

Academic Professionals

CRAIG COOK, B.S. University of Utah 1978; Assistant Research Scientist, Stable Isotope Facility Manager.
RACHEL D. MEALOR, B.S. University of Wyoming 2004; M.S. 2007; Assistant University Extension Coordinator 2007.
SCOTT SCHELL, B.S. University of Wyoming 1991; M.S. 1994; Assistant Extension Entomologist 2005, Associate Research Scientist 2009.
CALVIN STROM, Research Scientist 2010.

Adjunct Professors

Justin Derner, Brian Mealor, Jack Morgan, Ursula Norton, Ed Schmidtmann, Gerald Schuman, Nancy Shaw, Ramesh Sivanpillai, Jeffrey Smith

Professors Emeriti

Robert Heil, William Laycock, John Lloyd, Richard Olson, Quentin Skinner, George Vance, Thomas Wesche, Stephen Williams


Ecosystem Science and Management

The Department of Ecosystem Science and Management offers two programs leading to a Bachelor of Science degree. These are Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management and Agroecology (an interdepartmental program offered through the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management and the Department of Plant Sciences). The coursework requirements necessary for obtaining an agroecology degree are described in the department of Plant Sciences section of this publication. Either degree can also be obtained as an affiliate degree in conjunction with the School of Environment and Natural Resources. Seven minor degree programs are offered through the department: Insect Biology, Agricultural Entomology, Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management, Soil Science, Agroecology, Forest Resources, and Reclamation and Restoration Ecology. Obtaining a minor to compliment a B.S. major degree program provides credentials and knowledge that can expand career opportunities.

The degree programs reflect the department's diverse expertise in natural resource and agriculture sciences. Students completing degrees offered through the department are well prepared for careers in natural resource management and sustainable agriculture (e.g., range management, watershed management, restoration ecology/reclamation of degraded land, wildlife habitat management, biocontrol/integrated pest management, soil science, and various types of environmental consulting) or other science careers.

Minor in Forest Resources

The primary goal of the Forest Resources minor degree program is to develop a working knowledge of the processes that influence provision of the key products derived from forest lands. Courses taken in fulfillment of a major degree program will also be able to be applied to a minor degree program.

Minimum Requirements

Hours

RNEW 2100, SOIL 4150, RNEW 4775, and REWM 4540. Choose one from REWM 3100, REWM 4285, or REWM 4700, or GEOG 4420; choose one from GEOG 2550 or REWM 4103, choose one from REWM 2000, ZOO 2450, RNEW 3000 or GEOG 4470.

20

Minor in Reclamation and Restoration Ecology

This program covers the use of basic and applied ecological concepts to rehabilitate and restore processes and functions to disturbed ecosystems.

Hours
Required Courses LIFE 3400, SOIL 2010, REWM 4200, 4580, RNEW 4990 14
Planning and Policy (choose one) AGEC 4710, ENR 3000, GEOG 4040, GEOG 4750, REWM 4051, 4052, 4900 3
Below-Ground Processes (choose one) CE 4800, 4820, SOIL 4100, 4120, 4140, 4150, 4160 3-4
Above-Ground Processes (choose one) BOT 4700, 4111, ENTO 4678, 4685, GEOG 4200, REWM 4285, 4540, 4700, 4710, 4850, ZOO 4550 2-4
Total Hours 22-25

 

Graduate Study

The Department of Ecosystem Science and Management is an interdisciplinary department made up of five disciplinary areas: entomology, rangeland ecology, soil sciences, agroecology, and watershed management. The department offers the master of science and doctor of philosophy degrees in entomology, rangeland ecology and watershed management, and soil science. A water resources dual major may be obtained in conjunction with each of these master's degrees. For the rangeland ecology and watershed management degrees, thesis and dissertation problems may be developed in aspects of range ecology, wildlife habitat, reclamation of disturbed lands, watershed management, utilization and improvement of rangelands, and many other facets of range and forest ecology management. For the entomology degrees, thesis and dissertation problems may be developed in many areas of basic and applied aspects of insect ecology. For the soil degrees, thesis and dissertation problems may be developed in many basic and applied aspects of soil science. The degree programs reflect the department's diverse expertise in natural resource and agriculture sciences. Students completing degrees offered through the department are well prepared for careers in natural resource management and sustainable agriculture (e.g., range management, watershed management, restoration ecology/reclamation of degraded land, wildlife habitat management, biocontrol/integrated pest management, soil science and various types of environmental consulting) or other science careers.

A graduate certificate in reclamation and restoration ecology may be obtained after completion of a B.S. degree or in conjunction with an M.S. or Ph.D. degree.

At present, no program for graduate degrees in agroecology is offered; however, some courses at the graduate level are available. Responsibility for this program is shared with the Department of Plant Sciences. 

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Admission is contingent upon a faculty member being willing to assume responsibility for working with the student as an adviser.

Applicants are encouraged to initiate correspondence with faculty who share similar research interests as part of the process of securing faculty advising commitment.

In special circumstances, and with the faculty adviser's support, a student may be admitted in a provisional status with continued enrollment dependent upon meeting performance requirements specified at the time of admission.

Program Specific Graduate Assistantship Information

Current graduate assistantship availability, subject of study, and remuneration can be determined by checking: http://www.uwyo.edu/esm. Prospective students are also encouraged to directly correspond about future opportunities for graduate assistantships with faculty that share similar research interests.

Program Specific Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Entomology

Plan A (thesis)

The master of science degree normally is offered under Plan A which requires at least the university minimum degree requirements and an oral examination.

Plan B (non-thesis)

Requires 30 hours of graduate credit to include 9 hours of required courses, 11 hours of required electives, and 10 hours of other electives.

Plan B project - follows format of Plan A thesis.

A Plan B master of science will be a terminal degree program in the Ecosystem Science and Management. Students completing this option will not qualify for a subsequent Ph.D. program in Ecosystem Science and Management at the University of Wyoming.

Master of Science in Entomology/Water Resources

Please refer to the Water Resources section of this Bulletin for degree requirements.

Master of Science in Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management

Plan A (thesis)

The master of science degree normally is offered under Plan A which requires at least the university minimum degree requirements and an oral examination.

An oral defense of the thesis is required.

Plan B (non-thesis)

Plan B is available under special circumstances and requires 30 hours of graduate coursework.

Plan B candidates must also prepare one professional paper (i.e., content and form compatible with publication in a scientific journal) or, if the adviser requests, two professional papers in selected topic areas.

An oral defense of the paper(s) is required.

Master of Science in Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management/Water Resources

Please refer to Water Resources section of this bulletin for degree requirements.

Master of Science in Soil Science

Plan A (thesis)

Plan A requires the university minimum degree requirements and an oral final examination.

Plan B (non-thesis)

Plan B is available and requires 30 hours of graduate coursework.

An oral defense of the paper(s) is required.

Master of Science in Soil Science/Water Resources

Please refer to the Water Resources section of this bulletin for degree requirements.

Doctoral Programs

Doctor of Philosophy in Entomology

Candidates must complete the minimum requirements for the doctor of philosophy degree, plus a preliminary examination (written and oral) covering knowledge related to the discipline (taken after most coursework complete) and an oral final examination.

Doctor of Philosophy Program in Hydrology

Water Resources/Environmental Science and Engineering (WRESE) is an Interdisciplinary Ph.D. program that fulfills an important need by organizing a rigorous Ph.D.-level curriculum, with sufficient numbers of relevant, frequently-offered courses to serve the needs of Ph.D. students affiliated with program faculty.

The program's Ph.D.-level coursework is essential and forward-looking in areas such as aquatic chemistry, transport in natural systems, hydrometorology, land-atmosphere interactions, eco-hydrology, hydrogeology, vadose zone hydrology, hydrologic applications of stable isotopes, limnology, hydrologic modeling, hydological and water quality effects on aquatic organisms, hydroclimatology, hydrologic remote sensing and watershed hydrology. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management

Candidates must complete the minimum requirements for the doctor of philosophy degree, plus a preliminary examination (written and oral) covering knowledge related to the discipline (taken after most coursework complete) and an oral final examination.

Doctor of Philosophy in Soil Science

Candidates must complete the minimum requirements for the doctor of philosophy degree, plus a preliminary examination (written and oral) covering knowledge related to the discipline (taken after most coursework complete) and an oral final examination.

Graduate Certificate Program

Reclamation/Restoration Ecology Graduate Certificate

The Reclamation/Restoration Ecology (RRE) graduate certificate prepares the student to use basic and applied ecological concepts to reclaim and/or restore processes and functions to disturbed ecosystems. Reclamation and/or restoration of disturbed ecosystems requires an understanding of the edaphic, biotic, hydrologic, geologic, and topographic factors comprising these ecosystems, including the complex interrelationships that support and perpetuate ecosystem function. The graduate certificate will be granted to students who have completed a B.S. in an appropriate science-oriented discipline or are currently enrolled in an M.S. or Ph.D. program.

The graduate certificate will also be available to professionals working in reclamation/restoration oriented fields seeking to upgrade their training in reclamation and restoration ecology. Those interested in the graduate certificate will be required to complete the course work listed below as well as write a synopsis paper with a formal presentation advertised as an open forum seminar.

Required Certificate Courses:

Reclamation and restoration ecology courses:

REWM 4200, REWM 5580 6 hours

Reclamation problems:

SOIL 5565 or REWM 5640 4 hours

Reclamation process course (choose one):

GEOL 5070, GEOL 5111, BOT 5700, BOT 5740, BOT 5730, BOT 5780, PLNT 5070, PLNT 5470, GEOL 5444, GEOL 5570, REWM 5280, REWM 5710, RNEW 5540, SOIL 5100, SOIL/MATH 5110, SOIL 5120, SOIL 5130, SOIL 5140, SOIL 5150, ZOO 5550 3 hours

Planning/policy courses (choose one, 3 hours):

ENR 4900, ENR 5900, GEOG 5260, LAW 6660, POLS 5050

Minimum total credits needed: 16 hours

Courses of instruction in the department are offered in agroecology, entomology, rangeland ecology and watershed management, renewable resources, and soil science.

Ecosystem Science and Management (ESM) Courses

Renewable Resources (RNEW) Courses

Environment and Natural Resources Affiliate Degrees

Bachelor of Science degrees in either the Agroecology or the Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management offered through the Ecosystem Science and Management Department may also be obtained as affiliate degrees with the School of Environment and Natural Resources (i.e., the degree titles would be Environment and Natural Resources/Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management or Environment and Natural Resources/Agroecology). The additional coursework requirements necessary for obtaining an affiliate degree are described in the School of Environment and Natural Resources section.

Entomology Minors Programs

Because of the pervasiveness of insects, the entomology minors programs provide a vital link among the life and environmental sciences at the University of Wyoming. Students will be prepared to serve society not just through the vital industry of agriculture, but through contributions to basic biology, human and animal health, ecosystem management, wildlife conservation and a myriad of other ways.

Minor in Insect Biology

This minor is intended for students who have an interest in insects as organisms, including their basic biology, ecology and evolution. As insects dominate biological diversity, they are essential to most ecological systems, and have unique physiological systems. Students majoring in zoology, botany, molecular biology, biology or similar fields will find the study of these organisms a rewarding and valuable (if not essential) element of the life sciences.

In terms of biological diversity, at least 75 percent of all species are insects, with over 800,000 known species and another 10-50 million yet to be described. Insects are increasingly used as bioindicators of environmental health. Many industries now recognize that insects may be the world's richest, untapped natural resource, with billions of dollars of unexploited goods and services. Accessing these resources requires trained entomologists. Such training demands an academic setting, such as the University of Wyoming, where collections are maintained, productive faculty are involved in quality research and teaching, the latest methodologies are available and taught, the necessary scientific literature is readily accessible and a curriculum allows the student to pursue this field.

Minimum Requirements

Hours

Choose one from the following: ENTO 1000 or 1001; then choose from ENTO 4678, 4682, 4684, 4686, 4687,and 4884 to meet the minimum 13 credit hour requirement.

13

 

Insect Biology/Entomology Graduate Study

The department offers graduate work leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in entomology and an affiliated graduate option in water resources. Department faculty have active programs in insect ecology (biological control, population biology and plant-insect interactions), systematics (taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution) and pest management (biological control, biometrics and sampling, and pest management on humans, livestock, crops and rangeland).

Entomology (ENTO) Courses

 

Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management Major

Rangeland occupies 47% of the Earth's land area. The 50 million acres of rangeland in Wyoming provide diverse opportunities for the multiple uses of livestock and wildlife grazing, recreation, water production and natural beauty. Students are taught to understand and manage complex rangeland ecosystems.

The rangeland ecology and watershed management curriculum is designed for students choosing to study ecology, utilization and management of rangelands and wildland watersheds and related resources of forestry, recreation, wildlife management, soil science, botany and zoology. Degrees include Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy.

The undergraduate course of study helps students become well prepared for careers in natural resource management (e.g., range management, watershed management, restoration ecology/reclamation of degraded land, wildlife habitat management, ranch management, various types of environmental consulting), or other natural science careers. The curriculum fully meets the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) requirements for Range Conservationist. By appropriate course selection within the elective hours, students will also meet OPM requirements for additional professional work, such as soil conservationist or hydrologist.

Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management Graduate Study

Areas of graduate study leading to a M.S. or Ph.D. in rangeland ecology and watershed management include range ecology, animal nutrition, watershed management, wildlife habitat management, restoration ecology and reclamation of disturbed lands. A graduate certificate in reclamation and restoration ecology and a graduate option in water resources are offered in affiliation with the rangeland ecology and watershed management graduate degree.

Course Requirements for a Major in Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management (B.S.)

Courses

Hours

REWM 2000, 2500, 3020, 3500, 4330, 4530, 4700, 4830, 4850, 4900

26

Resource management SOIL 2010, SOIL 4120, AGEC 4700 and choose one from  BOT 4111 or RNEW 4130, BOT 3150 or GEOG 4200, USP general education requirements

15-16

Biological sciences LIFE 1010, and 2022, 2023, or MICR 2021, LIFE 3400 and BOT 4680 or REWM 4300

14-15

CHEM 1000

4

Communication skills USP WA and COJO 1010

6

Mathematics and quantitative reasoning
USP Quantitative Reasoning course, MATH 1400, STAT 2050

7

Humanities and social sciences
USP general education requirements, AGEC 1020

15

Physical Education

1

Electives

29-30

Total Hours

120

Minor
A minor in rangeland ecology and watershed management is available for students in other majors interested in increasing their knowledge of the field. The number of hours required is 22. The required courses for the minor are: LIFE 1010 (4 hrs) and 3400 (3); and REWM 2000 (3), 2500 (2), 4330 (3), 4530 (1) and 6 hrs. selected from other REWM upper-division (3000 or 4000 level) courses.

Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management (REWM) Courses

Earth System Science with a Concentration in Soil Science

The new Earth's Systems Science (ESS) undergraduate program integrates several disciplines across the UW campus, providing greater opportunities for students to learn about the importance of different components of the Earth. Soil Science is an integrating subject that unifies interactions among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. An ESS degree with a concentration in Soil Science enhances educational opportunities for students by offering unique learning experiences because of UW's location, resources and faculty.

Suggested Course Program

Freshman Year: Fall

Hours

ESS 1000

2

CHEM 1020 or CHEM 1050

4

MATH 1450

5

LIFE 1010

4

Total Hours

15

Freshman Year: Spring

Hours

SOIL 2010

4

CHEM 1030 or CHEM 1060

4

LIFE 2XXX

4

ENGL 1010

3

PEAC 1001

1

Total Hours

16

Sophomore Year: Fall

Hours

ESS 2000

4

SOIL 3130

3

MATH 2200

4

University Studies Cultural Context and Diversity course

3

Total Hours

14

Sophomore Year: Spring

Hours

MATH 2205

4

GEOL/GEOG Elective

5

BOT Elective

3

REWM Elective

3

Total Hours

15

Junior Year: Fall

Hours

SOIL 4120

4

ESS 3480

3

PHYS 1310

4

University Studies O course

3

Total Hours

14

Junior Year: Spring

Hours

ESS 4001

4

SOIL 4100

3

SOIL 4140

4

BOT/GEOL/GEOG 4111

3

Total Hours

14

Junior Year: Summer

Hours

ESS 4970

3

Total Hours

3

Senior Year: Fall

Hours

SOIL 4535

3

SOIL 4430

3

GEOG 4200

4

University Studies Cultural Context courses

6

Total Hours

16

Senior Year: Spring

Hours

ESS 4950

3

SOIL 4130

3

SOIL 4150 or 4160

3

University Studies V course

3

Total Hours

13

Minor in Soil Science

This program is designed to enhance soil expertise for students majoring in agricultural and natural resource degree programs. Undergraduate students minoring in Soil Science will enhance their job prospects with federal land management or conservation agencies (e.g., Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Natural Resources Conservation Society), state and federal regulatory agencies (e.g., Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality), mining and oil companies, environmental consulting companies, or scientific research organizations.

Course requirements (15 credit hours) for a Soil Science minor are: SOIL 2010, plus 11 credits of upper-division soil science courses for a total of 15 credits.

Soil Science Graduate Study

The department offers graduate work leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in soil science, an affiliated graduate certificate in reclamation and restoration ecology and an affiliated graduate option in water resources. Our faculty have active programs in soil-plant fertility and nutrition, soil morphology, genesis and classification, soil and water quality, environmental soil microbiology, soil and environmental chemistry, and soil and water physics. See the Graduate Bulletin for more details. 

Soil Science (SOIL) Courses

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